Dog First Aid : How to Treat an Ear Infection in a Dog

Dog First Aid : How to Treat an Ear Infection in a Dog


Once you’ve got the spot dirty on your cotton-ball,
you’re going to change it; in this case I just flipped it over. Okay, once I’ve
gotten that cotton-ball quite mucky, I’m going to get another one. Clean, start with
a clean cotton-ball, you might want to open your container. Okay, and you can go deeper
than you would in a dog’s ear, then you would think you would in a human’s ear,
but its best to hold the ear up and go in, and try to clean the ear out from the top,
using your cotton-ball. Never probe too deeply in here; you don’t want to puncture the
eardrum. Okay, so once you’ve used your medicated cleaner to clean out the dogs ear,
if your vet has given you an ointment and typically you’ll get some sort of an ointment
from your vet, then you’re going to take the ointment, put a small amount in the ear,
and then you’re going to massage the ear, so you’re moving that ointment all through
the ear. Once you’ve done that, you can wait until the next time you have to make
the application. Follow the instructions that are on the medicine that you get from your
vet, Um, this one for example, is instill in ear twice a day, for seven days. Make sure
you follow, even if it looks like the ear infection is cleared up, make sure that you
follow through to the end of the time period that the vet has instructed you to do.

How a Sick Chimp Led to a Global Pandemic: The Rise of HIV

How a Sick Chimp Led to a Global Pandemic: The Rise of HIV


Here at SciShow, we talk a lot about the fascinating,
complicated, and often very weird stories of discovery and collaboration that led to
the science we know today. But one of the strangest is something we haven’t
covered in much detail before, and it’s a biggie: the decades it took to figure out
exactly what HIV and AIDS were, and how to prevent and treat them. Since the start of the AIDS crisis, some 70
million people have been infected with HIV, and 35 million of those people have died. Both those numbers are staggering in their
own way, and together, they tell the story of a disease that has led to an incredible
amount of loss, but also one that — if you’re lucky enough to have access to the right medicines
— is no longer a death sentence. So, in honor of World AIDS Day on December
1, we want to tell you that story. There’s a lot to cover, so we’ll do it
in two parts. This episode, we’ll go over how we figured
out what HIV is, when the infection morphs into AIDS, and where we think the virus came
from. Next time, we’ll look back to the earliest
treatments, the arrival of antiretroviral drugs, which were complete game-changers,
and go over the creative ways scientists are now thinking about prevention and possibly
even a cure. But first, the basics. HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is a
retrovirus that infects immune cells, most notably what are known as CD4 T cells. The “retrovirus” part just means that
the virus uses RNA — DNA’s more wily, less stable cousin — as its genetic material,
and that once HIV infects a cell, it makes a DNA version of its genome with a special
enzyme, then inserts that DNA into the host genome. If that sounds sneaky — well, it is. And it’s part of why HIV has been so difficult
to treat, which we’ll talk about more next time. Now, those CD4 T cells that HIV infects and
ultimately kills are a kind of white blood cell known as ‘helper’ T cells. When they recognize a threat, they pump out
proteins that help coordinate a bunch of different immune responses. You definitely want them around. HIV is spread by bodily fluids, including
blood, semen, vaginal fluid, and breast milk. That’s why HIV can be transmitted through
sex, dirty needles, breastfeeding, and any other swapping of fluids you might do — with
a major exception: saliva isn’t one of those fluids. Saliva is full of other stuff that prevents
HIV from being infectious, like antibodies and a bunch of antimicrobial proteins. So unless there’s a lot of blood in your
saliva for some reason, it can’t transmit HIV. When someone is first infected, they might
feel like they have a bout of the flu, with a fever, headache, rash, sore throat, and
muscle and joint pain. That’s because the virus is infecting lots
of cells and the immune system is trying to fight it off. But within a few weeks those symptoms pass
because by then the person has specific antibodies that can keep the virus from running totally
rampant. After that, they usually feel fine for a long
time — in many cases, a really long time, like several decades. Until, one day, they don’t, because the
virus has finally killed off too many T cells, leaving the body unable to properly defend
itself against pathogens — anything that might be dangerous or infectious. That’s when someone is said to have AIDS,
or acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Usually AIDS is diagnosed once the person’s
T cell count falls below 200 cells per microliter of blood, which is well below the normal 500-1500,
or if they develop what’s called an opportunistic infection. These are infections that anyone with a reasonably
strong immune system would be able to fight off, easy-peasy. But because HIV has obliterated most of their
T cells, AIDS patients get sick. And, they can die. Most of the time it’s an opportunistic infection
that killed them. So, some of that was probably familiar to
you, but pretend for a moment that you’ve never heard of HIV or anything else I just
mentioned. Because back in the ‘80s, we didn’t know
these basic facts. All doctors knew was that suddenly, healthy
young gay men were developing extremely rare infections and cancers — and, it was killing
them. One of the first people to notice the pattern
was an immunologist at UCLA. Between the fall of 1980 and the following
spring, he saw a string of five patients, all gay men in their 20s or 30s, with an unusual
kind of pneumonia. There was a fungus growing inside their lungs. Normally, the fungus was totally harmless
and would never infect the lungs, but in these men it had, and it was making it hard for
them to breathe. The patients also had oral thrush — basically
yeast infections in their mouths — and few CD4 T cells. By June, when the immunologist wrote up the
results for the CDC’s weekly Mortality and Morbidity report, two patients had died. A month later, a dermatologist in New York
chimed in with a similarly disturbing report, this time with Kaposi’s sarcoma, a rare
cancer where patients develop blotchy purple lesions on their skin. In two and a half years, 26 young gay men
in New York and LA had been diagnosed with Kaposi’s. Some also had the weird fungal pneumonia,
and 8 had died. It’s hard to imagine now, but at this point,
scientists had no idea what was making people sick. They didn’t know if it was some sort of
toxin or a pathogen. And if it was an infection of some kind, they
didn’t know how it was spreading. That meant they couldn’t warn people about
how to protect themselves. The association with gay men, though, was
certainly striking, and early on, many called the mystery disease GRID, for gay-related
immune deficiency. Lots of people would talk about it as the
“gay cancer” or “gay plague.” But the disease wasn’t limited to gay men. It was turning up in hemophiliacs — people
whose blood doesn’t clot properly and are treated with clotting factors taken from other
people’s blood. Doctors were also seeing cases in IV drug
users, women, infants, and heterosexual men. In particular, 20 recent immigrants from Haiti
had gotten sick, and none said they were gay. Those clues were important, because they told
scientists the disease — which had finally been given the name AIDS — was probably
infectious, and probably transmitted by blood. There were other diseases that spread in similar
ways, like hepatitis B. So in March of 1983, the CDC issued a warning
that doctors needed to be careful about blood transfusions, and that the disease seemed
to spread through both gay and straight sex. Debates about the specifics, including whether
it could spread through saliva, would happen later. But what was the infectious agent? The race was on for scientists to figure out
what was causing the disease. French molecular biologist Luc Montagnier
suspected a virus because at the time, the blood products hemophiliacs used were filtered
for things like bacteria and fungi. But viruses were too small to catch. So along with his colleague Françoise Barré-Sinoussi,
he searched cells taken from AIDS patients and found a retrovirus. Around the same time, Robert Gallo at the
NIH in the US also identified a retrovirus in samples from AIDS patients. Both groups published their work in May 1983,
and shortly afterward another team found yet another retrovirus. All the viruses had been given different names,
and at first, it’s wasn’t totally obvious that they were the same thing. But they were, and in 1986, the cause of AIDS
had been given an official name: HIV. So, HIV was the problem, but where had it
come from, and why had the epidemic struck now, in the decade of big hair and Michael
Jackson? While some researchers were scrambling to
identify whatever it was that made AIDS infectious, others noticed that macaque monkeys also seemed
to suffer from an AIDS-like disease. One group decided to take some blood samples
from these sick monkeys, and in 1985 they found a virus that was similar to HIV. It was eventually called SIV, for simian immunodeficiency
virus. Researchers started to think that HIV might
have come from our primate relatives, jumping the species barrier. After a lot of work, they figured out that
the virus behind the epidemic was very similar to the chimpanzee version of SIV, and they
were the ones who had passed it to us. But how exactly? There’s no real way to put this delicately,
but most scientists agree that the reason why SIV made the leap into humans — what’s
called a spillover — is because we had a taste for bushmeat, or wild game. In this case, monkeys and chimps. This is known as the cut-hunter hypothesis. In the course of butchering a chimpanzee,
some SIV-infected chimp blood enters a small cut on the hunter’s hand. Or, a bit of blood splatters in their mouth. The virus is close enough to human biology
to infect the hunter, and over time, if the hunter passes the virus along to enough people,
it evolves into the HIV we know today. Spillovers like these happened many times
— we can tell because the virus mutates quickly, and by looking at genetic differences,
we can identify multiple lineages of the virus, each one corresponding to a spillover. We’ve traced the current epidemic to just
one of these, called ‘M’ for main. By analyzing chimpanzee pee and poop, researchers
think the chimps who passed that version of the virus to us lived in southwestern Cameroon,
in the forests near the Congo. And based on the oldest blood samples we can
find that we now know have HIV in them, which are from 1959 and 1960, scientists estimate
that HIV-1 first infected humans around 1908. If that seems like a long time ago, well,
it takes a while for a virus to take off. By the 1920s, it’s thought that the virus
traveled downriver — in a person, of course — to the burgeoning city of Kinshasa, then
known as the Belgian colonial city of Leopoldville. There weren’t many women around other than
prostitutes, so experts think HIV spread that way, and possibly through injectable drugs
the colonists used to treat some tropical and venereal diseases. This was before disposable syringes, and nurses
were trying to treat lots of people with just a few of them, so the syringes may have only
been rinsed with alcohol before being used on the next patient. So the very methods meant to stop the spread
of disease may have actually been
encouraging it. With time, infected people in Kinshasa left
to go to other places, and they did the unavoidable: they brought the virus with them. Because the virus mutates so quickly, we can
group the viruses into 9 different subtypes and get a sense of how HIV traveled around
the world from Central Africa. Several subtypes spread to other parts of
Africa. Subtype C went south and then landed in India. Subtype B went to Haiti — and then, through
several quirks of history, came to the US. First, in 1960, when the Belgians left the
Congo, French-speaking Haitians started to arrive in the Congo to work as doctors, lawyers,
and other professionals. But with the creation of Zaire in 1965, the
immigrants felt unwelcome, so they went back to Haiti, bringing HIV with them. There, HIV expanded especially quickly, possibly
because of a plasmapheresis center where people could get paid to donate their blood plasma. The center used a machine that mixed the blood
of different donors, allowing viruses to transfer. By 1982, nearly 8 percent of a group of young
mothers in a Port-au-Prince slum were HIV-positive — an astoundingly high number. HIV is thought to have entered the US around
1969, with just one infected person or unit of plasma from Haiti. It took about a decade for anyone to notice,
but by then it was too late. The epidemic had begun, and HIV was not only
in the Americas, but Europe and Asia, too. And now that it was here, we needed to figure
out how to fight it. But we’ll get to that in the next episode
of this mini-series. In the meantime, thanks for watching this
episode of SciShow, and if you want to learn more about HIV and all kinds of other science,
you can go to youtube.com/scishow and subscribe.

8 TIPS FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS (**dont worry**) | Doctor Disney

8 TIPS FOR FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS (**dont worry**) | Doctor Disney


what’s up everyone welcome back to you
what’s up doc it’s the YouTube channel or it’s like a mid school journaling my
journey through med school med D anyway just want to congratulate the class of
2021 you’re about to start med school some of you already have but obviously
usually when students starting so I just want to do a video where I talk about
the top 5 things I wish I knew when I started med school looking back like
what I would have done differently look the class of 2021 let’s try to get 21
like first tip that I have is that you should buy first aid now let’s talk
about first aid first aid is a book that’s basically gonna be your Bible
throughout the med school and especially when you’re studying for the step exam I
wish I had it when I was starting because I think it’s a public health
major and so when I came to med school I didn’t know what was going on with very
first few months because there’s a lot of like the biochem genetic like bio
salvo and I didn’t have a strong grasp of what those things are and so when I
would go to class was just memorizing the powerpoints nobody came time for me
to study first step I opened up first date and I was going to the biochem
chapter and it was so well organized alekhya ler cellular genetics and
nutrition I don’t know why nutrition is in it so whatever talk about some kind
of process in biochem then right next to it it’ll say a disease that happens when
someone is deficient in one of these enzymes I was then that I’m able to
follow the story of what biochem is about now the thing about first aid I
know I’m talking a lot about first aid the other tips are nothing business so I
didn’t get first aid when I was starting med school and it wasn’t until December
that I received a letter mail from the AMA the American Medical Association
they said hey could you sign up for the AMA for four years it’s 68 dollars which
is what it is when you’re gonna go start in med school they’re gonna say hey
please sign up at $60 and you get like one free flash cards your textbook
depending on which school you go to or less what my school did I didn’t do it
coming Christmas time they sent me a letter at home and they said hey if you
sign up for AMA now it’s those sixty dollars but we’ll throw in the first aid
book the new version for you and I was like wow
because I was planning to buy first date anyway you have to my first date like
everyone does it’s a forty dollar book or $35 link in the description if you
don’t know where to find it I got the ami membership for two so I don’t know
if they’re gonna get it this year but they did it last year too I guess that’s
what they do every year that’s a cool trick that you could use it wait until
Christmas time they’ll mail you and let you know about it but I will recommend
for those of you who aren’t super strong in your Sciences or don’t have a strong
background I would recommend getting first aid now write all your notes in to
first aid because when you come back first step first date is like an outline
and all your notes from powerpoints will help you understand context of what’s
going on tip number two I found this out actually recently so if you’re a third
year watching this or anyone really I found out about this book I don’t know
is it backwards probably Peter switch all right so this book is backwards I
can’t tell this book is called the perfect HMP and I put the link in the
description for you there was actually a student from Robert Wood he told me
about this and it is so helpful the other topic like has why the person’s
coming in the chief complaint how old they are male or female and then like so
much information about them and it helps you like understand the patient-centered
courses that you’re gonna go through on the bottom there’s like review of
systems so like I wish I had this when I was starting that school because we like
learn all the things about patience and I love those courses to have all the
information here just helps you if you see this every single time you see a
patient don’t have this chart memorized in your head then the back side it has a
lot of physical exam stuff it has like the tough back or subject that you would
want to learn or go through if you don’t want to get it yet that’s fine you can
wait because this is more like a second year third year and Beyond kind of thing
I’m gonna kind of contact people who sell this thing and see if they can give
us the discount I put it in the future video I still wish I had a person second
year because we were learning it in different times medical history surgical
history review of systems we didn’t have it all at one time and so it was nice to
see it all laid out perfectly and really organized tip number three is to develop
a routine you’re gonna be doing a bunch of stuff
Oh bunch of stuff Monday you’re gonna study Tuesday you’re gonna go to the gym
Wednesday you’re gonna study Thursday you’re gonna go hang out with your
family Friday you’re gonna do this like the more you have in your schedule the
easier it is gonna be for your study because in med school you’re not
required to go to classes terminal schools and even we are required to go
to classes you have to so much other time to study that most students just
fall to the wayside and don’t use that time to study and end the procrastinate
I know it’s so easy to procrastinate a progressive thing sure you make about a
specific time every day make sure that you go to bed Pacific time every day
make sure that your body just accustomed to these things because if you just let
yourself be relaxed let’s all do it later all do it later you will fall to
the wayside and become the time to exams you will panic just like Lisa tip number
four don’t panic you’re not panic you got accepted to med school you are a med
student now you are a medical student so you are capable you will become a doctor
don’t panic don’t freak out there are gonna be days you’re gonna be like I
can’t do this there’s no way I’m gonna be able to you will be fine I think med
schools kind of accept students who are type-a which is like everything this to
be perfect everything needs to be done on time high intensity people but like
relax relax read every so often download the column
app if you want and do like a five-minute breathing exercise in the
morning just make sure that you have time for yourself failure is not a an
indication of who you are it is an opportunity for learning think of it
that way failure is an opportunity for you to
learn to do something differently everyone’s gonna fail in med school
everyone’s not necessarily in your grades but you’re gonna fail in making
this research project on time you’re gonna fail in volunteering this many
hours your you can do it all in life you just can’t and the earlier that you
recognize it and the earlier that you can deal with your failure the better it
is for you the healthier you will be everyone’s done anyone who tells you in
life that they haven’t failed is a liar because they’ve might just be thinking
about academically but there are more than one way there is more there are
more than one see I just filled in my English there is more than one way to
fail you see failure as an opportunity for
learning this leads into tip five make sure that you have a strong community of
people who are around you it can help you go through the motions of metal
because there are some days where going to be at your darkest and some things
are your brightest and you need to make sure that the people around you are
supporting you and are helping you and you can talk to them about anything
suppression is a mature mechanism to deal with problems in life but as our
psychiatry professor told us you cannot suppress everything at some point you’re
gonna explode and everything’s young come pouring out you need to vent it out
just talk to people have something you can talk to because I’m at school it’s
like I say it’s hard because it’s not hard and I think and the thing that
might be a separate video we do about medical education just think it’s poorly
structured but you do need a support system and I think anyone regardless of
who you are watching this you need a support something like and now we’re
gonna have another tip from Peter at the Falls let’s go another tip for med
school to make sure that you work out
every so often too soon you don’t die when you want vacations start to do real
things back to you Peter thank you Peter so that was just Peter
at the Falls he gave you a tip whether your ball in the gym or a Sports Club it
doesn’t matter to make sure that your body is active and you’re doing things
and make sure you’re eating right this is video real now going back to the
rest of the tips that was pretty cool on the promise
do not neglect your local nuts I had a medical student who came up to me and he
was the first year last year and he was I saw on the Ella grace I said hey are
you doing and he said I’m doing fine said Oh what are you doing this week and
he said oh I’m gonna study I said oh that’s boring he said yeah but
I was thinking of going home for my mom’s birthday but I really just need to
study and I looked in and I was like dude I respect your decision to stay and
study however I think it’s very important that you think about what
you’re gonna cut out from your life and if you don’t go home for your mom’s
birthday you’re probably not gonna go home in the future for someone else’s
birthday right I go for weddings you’re not gonna go home for funerals god
forbid and you start cutting out your parts of your life that are important to
you in order to succeed in this field I’m probably gonna have another video or
to talk about my problems with medical education how there’s so much stress put
on people’s back actually just saw the trailer for a movie called do no harm
it’s a documentary about a position of suicide and how 1 million patients will
lose their doctor to suicide every year I think that’s very real and it shows a
deep problem and out our education is structured not specifically like
targeting any particular schools curriculum but just there isn’t an
emphasis on Student Wellness and there’s a high expectation and I know there’s
some of you are watching this and like what we just need to suck it up we just
need to do it this is how it’s always been done the gap if that’s how it’s
always been done that’s fine if slaves never spoke up and said all
this is just how it’s always been done and slavery to still be around
I’m not equated the two flavor is absolutely infinitely worse but the idea
that we need to step out and recognize problems and change them is what is
important for us to do the problem is that a lot of students are cutting away
from their personal lives in effort to succeed in med school and they’re trying
to climb the ladder medicine and they just have people at
the top just badgering them now putting more hoops for them to jump through and
that’s all we have to do don’t sacrifice your parties or events that you want to
go to that are important to you make sure that you take time for yourself and
your self healing whether that’s in your room or that’s at a party whether that’s
with your family do what it is that’s important to you because that’s the
energy that’s gonna drive you through all of med school yeah so I just want to
leave you with one more tip this one I heard from a fourth-year who when I was
starting second year she told me about it and it was it was actually really
revolutionary for me and it has to do with your study style it’s gonna take
you a while to figure out how you study best and that’s okay everyone takes
their own time the advice that she gave me was to quote stay in your lane what
it means is you’re gonna be studying your own way and you’re gonna see your
friends setting a different way and then other people posting things online
saying oh I’m studying this way oh look I just did this so here’s a free study
guide and it’s great that we’re all sharing things but for those students
out there like myself it’s easy to fall into the trap of trying to do everything
and so I would I know that I learned best from videos until YouTube a lot of
stuff and that’s how I was learning so a lot of people would post online be like
I just read chapter three in Costanzo and I thought it was really good you
guys should check it out you know yeah yeah I should I should chickens oh yeah
I’m a week Costanzo and I start reading Costanzo and then by like the third
paragraph I’m exhausted and I can’t continue studying because that’s just
not how I said you guys I just made all these free flash cards and on commute
and feel free to use them yeah I’ll use flashcards yeah that’s good I
could do some like when I’m at the gym I’m go to the gym I start using all
these different resources that everyone’s posting but I never
completely finished one thing that’s useful for me and so what I would
recommend that you do and this is what the student her name is sorry you god
bless you sure dude some PowerPoint let’s also do some YouTube video let’s
do some Costanzo reading and then let’s also do some flashcards you get like 25%
of each of them but you never get the full picture of what you’re actually
studying because you never complete something – it’s both to its fullest so
like pick to do it to its fullest 100% don’t you completed them and then as
needed reference the textbook if that’s what you need reference an animation on
YouTube if that’s what you need use some flashcards if you can’t remember
some pathway that’s really difficult for you to memorize stay in your lane and
pick two resources when you’re studying and hopefully that will at least give
you some platform to build your study style off of it takes most people even
until second year to figure out how they study best so don’t stress out everyone
goes through it and reach out to your mentors or comment below I guess if you
need help you so much for watching please share around if you thought that
this was helpful and write in the comment and let me know if you want me
to talk about anything else you want me to talk about medical education if you
want me to talk about how I studied in med school or anything else I have some
ideas and things that I want to talk about but I want you guys to join me in
on this journey that we’re now all on getting we’re all gonna be doctors alright so take care what is it
be safe be strong be swag god bless you and I’ll see you in the next one what is
up everyone wow that’s it forever – just try it one more time so what I ended up
doing was I didn’t get first aid and then Christmas Wow post nasal drip or
something feel free to watch any of the other videos I’ll list them in here I’m
just kidding it’s gonna be here watch the other video I really like this video make sure you watch this video and she
wants this video and make sure you subscribe

Prov. firefighters

Prov. firefighters


NEW THIS MORNING… PROVIDENCE FIREFIGHTERS HAVE APPROVED A SETTLEMENT WITH THE CITY– THAT RESOLVES LAWSUITS ABOUT COST OF LIVING ADJUSTMENTS. A SECRET BALLOT VOTE WAS HELD TO RATIFY THE AGREEMENT LAST NIGHT– WHICH PASSED 70 PERCENT TO 30 PERCENT. THE NEW SETTLEMENT INCLUDES SEPERATE AGREEMENTS FOR ACTIVE FIRE AND POLICE AND RETIRED FIRE AND POLICE. IT ALSO PROVIDES FOR A SUSPENSION OF THE COLAS FOR A TEN YEAR PERIOD– AND REQUIRES MEMBERS TO ENROLL IN MEDICARE WHEN THEY ARE ELIGIBLE.

Immigration Relief for Victims of Human Trafficking

Immigration Relief for Victims of Human Trafficking


Human Trafficking is a form of modern-day
slavery. Victims are often lured under the false pretenses of good jobs and better lives
and then forced to work under brutal and inhumane conditions. Many believe that human trafficking
is a problem that only occurs in other countries. But human trafficking also happens here in
our own neighborhoods. Human trafficking is one of the most heinous
crimes that we investigate. Where traffickers prey on vulnerable populations. When I learned I was coming to America. I
was happy I was coming to America. Oh, it’s America. It’s the land of opportunity.
And I grabbed it. The opportunity. To get. To come here. They told me they will take care of everything,
paperwork and everything; I wouldn’t have to worry about it. They use them as a commodity, holding them
against their will using force, fraud of coercion for the purposes of forced labor or commercial
sex. She asked for my passport. She said where
is your, do you have your passport, I said, yes I have it. And then she take it. “I will
take care of this” and I trusted her. When I was with them I never thought that
I will leave them and will have my freedom again, for a very long time. Many victims don’t realize that they have
rights and protections in the United States. One such protection that victims of human
trafficking may be eligible for is the T Visa. The T nonimmigrant status (or T Visa) provides
immigration protection to victims of severe forms of trafficking who assist law enforcement
in the investigation and prosecution of human trafficking cases. Often, victims are afraid to come forward
and worry that law enforcement will bring them back to their traffickers. At the traffic lights, those cameras. They
would point those to us, to me, and tell me that “you see those camera?” The police are
checking on you, so if you try to escape or try to run away they will still catch you. Every time we go out, when you go out be careful
of the police they might arrest you, or don’t find any friend, don’t talk to neighbor, don’t
talk to people They going to call the police and I was scared I didn’t have nowhere to
go at that time. My role as a special agent investigating these
crimes is to identify someone whose been a victim of human trafficking, assist that victim,
rescuing them from the situation, helping them connect with different services that
they have. That they regain their freedom of will. They told me that, “don’t worry, just tell
the truth, just tell what’s going on and we will help you.” When the FBI asked me if I wanted to leave
with them or if I wanted to stay back, and when I told them that I wanted to leave with
them, and they told me “ok, let’s go up and collect your things.” That’s when I felt like
I felt a little bit relived knowing that I’m going to leave that family. Once law enforcement is involved, victims
can petition for a T Visa through USCIS. Victims are not required to be in legal immigration
status to be eligible for a T Visa, but they must, Be a victim of a severe form of trafficking
in persons. Be physically present in the United States
on account of the trafficking. Comply with any reasonable requests for assistance
in the investigation or prosecution, or be under the age of 18, or Suffer extreme hardship involving unusual
and severe harm if removed from the United States. To apply for a T nonimmigrant status, applicants
must file Form I-914, Application for T Nonimmigrant Status. Qualifying family members may also
be eligible to apply for immigration benefits. Visit www.uscis.gov/humantrafficking, or call
the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-373-7888 for information on how to
get help. If USCIS grants T nonimmigrant status the
applicant will automatically be eligible to work. The T nonimmigrant visa is valid for
four years and a visa holder may be eligible to apply for permanent residence with a green
card after three years in a T nonimmigrant status. Human trafficking is a particularly difficult
crime to investigate because victims of trafficking don’t normally self-identify and also because
it’s a crime that’s hidden in plain sight. Traffickers operate in an underground society,
they isolate their victims, they often times take their identity documents. They assure
that there’s no communication between family and friends. So it’s hard for us to identify those victims.
Which is why we often ask the public to be aware of those different indicators, and if
they see them to report that suspicious activity. She started telling us not to talk to anybody.
we’re not supposed to talk to anybody or we’re not supposed to use her phone to call anybody. And then days pass and pass and weeks then
I realize that I haven’t gotten a day off, I haven’t stopped working. I was thinking, who’s gonna believe me? What
I’m thinking is, she has the paper. She’s a citizen. And me I’m just like, I don’t have
any paperwork. I was feeling they’re gonna believe her, not me. I used to work 7 days a week. I didn’t have
any days off. And we had to stay up late, until around 3. And we had to wake, to be
up and ready by 6 in the morning. Every single day. There are several human trafficking indicators
that people can be aware of. Do you know someone who, Isn’t allowed to
control or possess his or her identification and travel documents? Is forced to perform
sexual acts? Cannot freely move, contact family or friends, or socialize? Has been threatened that they or their family
will be harmed if they try to escape? Has been harmed or deprived of food, water, sleep,
medical care or other life necessities? Is the victim a juvenile engaged in commercial
sex? If you do see any of these indicators, call
the Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-373-7888. You can also contact the center for help in
getting a T Visa. I start working with my lawyer telling my
story, working to apply for T-visa, now I have my T-visa. Now I still continue working
without doubt. Now I’m looking forward to applying for my green card. I was so happy in that time. Finally I’m legal,
I can be able to find a job now. I got my green card in July. I’m still working
at the same place. I’ve been working since 2009. I’m planning to go home soon for a visit.
And then when I come back then I’d like to start school. If there was a message to tell victims it
would be, do not be afraid to come forward, call 911 if you are in harms-way, to know
that you have rights under the law in the US and if you see suspicious activity to please
report it. Together, law enforcement, community organizations,
and people like you can help end human trafficking. Call the National Human Trafficking Resource
center at 1-888-373-7888 to report human trafficking and for other inquiries. For more information,
visit www.uscis.gov/humantrafficking.