7 “60 Second” Stretches to Cure a Stiff Neck NOW-Pain Relief Exercises

7 “60 Second” Stretches to Cure a Stiff Neck NOW-Pain Relief Exercises


Hi folks, I’m Bob Shrupp, physical
therapist. Brad Heineck,physical therapist. Together, we are the most famous physical
therapist on the internet. In our opinion of course Bob.. Seven Brad. That number we
really love. Seven, 60 second pain relief exercises for a stiff neck Nobody has
time anymore to do anything, do they? Right. So it’s like a quick, quick, quick,
da-da-da. but you know something Bob, seven, you
know why we picked the number seven? I’m just waiting to hear. The number seven is
complete. Is it really? That’s complete. There’s seven days in a week there’s
seven candles on the candelabra. There’s seven as they come. Where does he come up
with this stuff? I learned that from a 90 year old gentleman and he was very
knowledgeable, and believe me, if he said it, it’s true. All right, well ,we have
seven people here waiting right now that are new to our Channel please take a
second to subscribe to us. We provide a video on how to stay healthy. Videos on
how to stay healthy, pain free and we upload every day, also once seven of you go over
to Facebook and like us because Brad and I as children, this is really sad, we’re not
liked, and now we’re. There might be seven people who did like me though Bob. That’d
be a lot If I sat down with a piece of paper. Including your dog. Let’s get on with the exercises. These are the exercises
we’re going to do for cervica,l or start with the upper neck, right? Right. Okay,
you’ve got neck stiffness, I’m talking about stiffness. We’re not talking about
pain or symptoms that run down the arm. You might have pain and stiffness up in
the neck. Neck or up in shoulder. Yeah, if you’ve got stuff going down in your arm
that’s, that, we’re not going to treat that here. That’s more of a McKenzie thing You
may want to watch one of our McKenzie videos. Right. McKenzie. Yup, for arm pain we’ve got lots of videos.
They know how to find us Bob. Yeah okay, so we’re talking about the neck here, and
should we get closer? Yeah, we should get closer.
I had, I had my little red pointer but I lost it. So here we ,we got a little
rubber – Yeah, what is all that about? Well, that’s another video Bob. Here you go.
Here’s your pointer. Oh, all right. so man I am just all thumbs today. So we’re
talking about the neck. Now, if you look at the neck we got seven cervical
vertebrae and the top two are responsible for 50% of our head movement,
right to left.Yeah. So there’s a lot going on up here ,and that, as therapists
that helps us decide how we’re going to treat,so we’re gonna give you a quick
overview of that. Yeah, so generally, if I see someone comes in, and they have a neck
that’s not turning very well, I look at the C1 C2. Right. By the way, you kinda missed
something Brad here. There’s seven cervical spine. Didn’t I say that? Yeah
but that goes along with our number seven. Precisely. What a segue huh? so anyways if you
have if you’re finding that you’re turning like this, chances are you’ve got
some tight muscles up it here. In the upper upper cervical spine. Right.
But if you can turn your head like 45 degrees each direction and then
you’re turning your body, you’re probably loose up in here but you had a lot of
tight muscles in the lower cervical or the lower neck. He’s tight to
the left. Yeah, we’re gonna work on him. Let’s go after him.
Maybe we better save his his treatment for later Bob. All right .we’ll let,we’ll
let Gumby take care of him for now. He looks hungry. All right what’s the first one
Brad? Okay, first one. That’s not my favorite chair. First thing we want to do
just, maybe the muscles are tight back there, for whatever reason. We’ve
done this before, but you’re gonna go up just below the ox but that’s the bone
right here ,go down and when you start to feel some muscle there you’re gonna work
that and we’re gonna splay it out, like this. He’s pulling his fingers apart. Right. Pulling his
fingers apart, and well ,you know, if you sit a lot, and you’re on the computer a
lot, and your heads forward like this these muscles tighten up. Yup. And so it
works out really good to go ahead and do that splaying massage and also little
circles. Yeah, there we go, and you’re gonna get in
there and you’ll know, I mean you might feel one side is more tender than the
other you’ll feel a knot in there. You’re gonna, you’re gonna spend more time on
that side. It’s hard to believe somebody would not like this, I mean it always feels good
even when you don’t have anything going on. Right.It feels good right now. It’s better to have somebody
else do it for you. Sixty seconds is up Bob. We gotta go to number two..
Okay. Our famous chin tucks. In like this.
Looking at it from the back we’re going in and we’re stretching. We’re not going down.
We’re not going up. we’re going straight back yeah like I was gonna do that to Bob’s
face, okay. But you can see it pulls and gently stretches those
same muscles we just massaged okay? This is a great one to do throughout the day,
because one, not only does it, it’s good to get the neck moving ,but two, it
realigns you, where you’re supposed to be. Ears are supposed to be over the
shoulders. All right. And so, when you’re if you’re finding yourself like this, and
the ears are lined up with my thighs. Right. You need to readjust and get it
back into position. All about posture. The next one is, this one is, if this feels
good you make a fist, okay? You know we’ve might turn fist up like this. Yep,
so the thumb would go down, but you gotta get the thumb back in there. Yeah. Okay, put it
in here, right above your sternum, and underneath your chin and then just
gently grab here, and we’re gonna use that for a little fulcrum and we’re
gonna I wonder if they can hear you Brad. So he’s using it as a fulcrum, the idea here
by the way, you can, you can overdo this so be very gentle with this because you
can get a lot of stress on the upper neck with this but this can help loosen
up and almost gives a little bit of traction, doesn’t it? Yup a little bit. You’re only going to do this, if it feels good. If it doesn’t feel good, you don’t do it.
good you don’t do it right yeah okay the O.K. Next one is rotations. We’re going to
work on rotation, particularly, if there’s one direction and you can see that this
one goes about to here and this one is normal, taking a nice towel roll like
this or if you happen to have the Yoga strap, yoga strap that works really nice
as well. Any products we talk about or recommend, they’re always in our
description below in the Amazon products Yep. So. Yep, there we go, and this is a one
where I like to do the crisscross. So yeah, what he did is, okay I got my right
hand and left hand I’m actually gonna switch them and now I got the right hand
on the left strap on the and left hand on the right strap and I’m pulling down on
this one. Right. That’s just kind of an anchor is what I tell people. And then I go
across like this. Actually on this one Brad, I actually like to the strap better,
because this strap really can get on different levels. Sure. This is, cause if you
look it’s getting the whole neck which is fine. Yup. I definitely would try
this. Yup, but if you want to get a little more advanced, now I can go a
little bit lower even, and do it again. But notice, he’s always going across the jaw bone. Not
across the neck like this. That will cut off breathing and we like to breathe,, so.
Air is good. Okay, so you can work both directions. Now, if you’re in
that situation where you can turn here and then it get ‘s stiff, it’s more than
likely the lower neck. We’re gonna start out with again some soft tissue work. You
can get it back with your hands. It’s kind of hard to reach back there unless
you’ve got excessively long forearms and fingers. If you have a hook cane like
this or you grab a theracane or we got the Back knobber here. The back knobber, yep.
And we’re going to get back to those muscles and you’re just gonna work them.
You’ll find that you’ll get on a trigger point and a lot of times I just like to
hold pressure there for up to 30 seconds and typically it’s gonna feel like it
hurts so good and then it actually feels better and when they say it releases
after about 30 seconds and when you’re done it feels like oh boy, that helped.
then you know you’re doing the right thing. I like to do it a little bit
differently. I like to get on the spot and I like to do movement with the neck
while you’re doing it, and I find out which one helps. So let’s say I put it on the
spot let’s say you have a knot there. I might try chin tucks. I might try
rotations. Yup. And I might do side bending. Right.
I’m gonna see which one seems to take the pain away. Right. If there’s one I’m
gonna keep doing it. So usually, I try side bending toward the pain first. Okay.
So, I’ll go like this and I’ll go I’ll keep doing it it’s like oh that is
starting to feel better then I know I’m on to something ,so. Yeah. I’d like to do
the combination of both. Right ,so there’s a couple options and you do what works
best for you so yeah. We’re trying to give you tools. Yeah. Okay Bob you
probably’ want to try this, because once again we’re gonna work with chin
tucks because that also works the lower neck as well as the upper and after
you do five or ten of those, then we’re gonna do extensions and this is really
nice to have a kind of warming up. And then you know you could start off like
Brad likes to do, like down like this. Yep. My neck just cracked a little. There you go, and I
tell you if this is one of those things like you can go back a little further
and it feels better when you have the support here, then you’re gonna continue
to work it. If for some reason it hurts or gives you pain down your arm, you stop
all these and then it’s a different treatment. Again, why I like the strap for
this one now, is now I can work my way up. Sure. And again or work my way
down. And I work,and I like it, when I do it that way then I like to have it my
thumbs right here and my eyes are following the thumb. Yep. I’m not going
like this. I’m going like this. This is a different way of doing, it as opposed to
doing like this. Yep. You do. Follow the thumbs or the little bunny ears. I don’t
know. Whatever you want to make it. So, the next one very similar to the previous
upper neck work, again, we’re doing the rotatation. We’re doing the rotation.
Sometimes, I may pull over down here. It seems to emphasize lower on the neck and
that’s up to the individual. I hope I can, My mic is working here. So, I’m not
gonna spend a lot of time with that because we have just done that. Yeah., we already did it, yeah. And
the last one this is a kind of a fun one because when this one works it works
really well and it’s not that hard.I think you should show them on the spine-first Brad. Let’s do that. Got your
little pen? Yeah, yeah I guess the red one too. So there’s, these little bumps are
called spinous processes and. So you can feel them on
your neck, if you feel back there you’ll, that’s what you’re feeling is those
bumps. Right. There’s always a big one that’s, that’s C7 like right here. What you
do is, you’re gonna grab with that and you’re gonna actually pull and help the
spine move and get it moving and we’re actually doing this through your skin, so
it’s a little, you don’t get a good grip on it like you do on the spine but I’ve
had a lot of success with this in the clinic with people. And it’s an
experiment again, because you’ll grab onto the spine and then maybe have them
turn. Right. And if that goes ow, ow, that makes it worse, stop. Right. Then you might try
going up a little higher a little lower grab the spine above it and move it. Can
you see that Lonnie, where I’m I’m gonna rotate to the right and I’m pulling me
to the left right so I’m pulling this way and it’s pretty subtle, and this
should feel better like, oh man that feels good and I can rotate more. You’re
right on. If it hurts just forget about it. Just forget about it, yeah. Forget about it. Those are
some good hints Brad, and I think you did well.
Remember, Brad and I, we haven’t said this in a while. Yeah. Remember Brad and I can fix
just about anything. Except a broken heart. Okay. But we continue to work at
it. There it is. Thanks. you

How Does Icing an Injury Help?

How Does Icing an Injury Help?


Probably one of the first things you do when
you bang your knee or twist your ankle is put an ice pack on the injury. You probably know that that can help reduce
swelling and dull the pain, especially within the first couple days after you get hurt. But why interfere with the way your body’s
trying to naturally heal itself? When you pull a muscle, stretch a tendon,
or burst a blood vessel, that triggers your body’s inflammatory response: it sends a
bunch of blood cells and fluids to repair the damage. And that is an important part of the healing
process. The problem is, your inflammatory response
tends to overreact. If you’ve ever gotten hay fever in the spring
and felt like your eyes and nose were going to melt off your face, you know what I’m
talkin’ about. Too much swelling can cause a bit of a traffic
jam with all the fluids rushing in, which can cut off nearby cells from getting the
oxygen they need to keep functioning. And that is where icing an injury, also known
as cryotherapy, can help. When you put ice on a part of your body that’s
inflamed, the tissues and blood vessels contract, limiting how much blood and other fluids can
get to the area and bringing down the swelling. Cold can also slow down the cells’ metabolism,
so they use the oxygen they do have more slowly and don’t die. If it’s at a joint, like if you sprain your
ankle, you’ll be able to use it a little more, and maybe do some rehab exercises. But if you leave an ice pack on for too long,
it can actually do more harm than good. If the injury site gets too cold, your body
will flood in even more blood cells and fluids, trying to warm it back up, even if you’re
still using the ice pack. This renewed blood flow is called hyperemia,
and it’s why doctors say it’s generally good to limit cryotherapy to about 10 or 20
minutes at a time. After that, let your injury warm up for 10
minutes or so before putting the ice pack back on. Ice can also reduce the pain you feel. When they get cold, the ions that carry messages
around between neurons have a harder time getting around, reducing the pain signals
going to your brain. Also reducing lots of other kinds of signals,
which is what numbness is. So when you get hurt, it is important to let
your body do its thing and heal. Ice just helps make sure your body doesn’t
overreact, and keeps you a little more comfortable in the process. Thanks to all of our Patreon patrons who keep
these answers coming, and for more on the science of injuries, check out this other
SciShow video where Michael explains why papercuts hurt so dang much.

Getting Back On The Bike | How To Recover From Injury With Neil Donoghue

Getting Back On The Bike | How To Recover From Injury With Neil Donoghue


– You might have seen the
recent Andes Pacifico video and seen me fall off my bike and get injured. Ended up in hospital for
second time in as many years. I thought this video I’ll talk you through
the crash a bit more, the injuries I got, and how I’ve rehabbed for the second time in two years. And basically, my tips for
getting back on the bike after a big injury. Like any big crash I’ve ever had, I always try think about how it happened, why I fell off. So that was actually day
three of the Andes Pacifico. We’d had a really big hike in the morning, sort of three hours. And it was getting late in the day when I fell off my bike. I think I had a bit of heatstroke, it was super hot. I’d probably drunk about
two liters of water, and basically, I told myself to chill out, but I didn’t do it enough. I had a pretty big crash, I know the video doesn’t
really quite do it justice, but I landed on my leg hard on the rocks. And I knew my race was probably done. My stem was all twisted, I was feeling pretty battered, I lost loads of time. But at that moment in time, it didn’t really feel like I was injured. So I rolled down to the
finish line of that stage and I knew my race was done by then. My elbow was pretty shredded, so I got some medical attention for that and got that scrubbed out which was fun, as you’d expect. But my thigh was really
starting to balloon really big. Had a little puncture wound in there, but it really wasn’t bleeding very much. So they strapped it up, well, cleaned it up and strapped it, and it was only about two hours later, when we got back to camp I took that puncture wound dressing off and it started really
bleeding, really badly. So, luckily I got a bit of help
from Loose Dog in his tent. He run over, helped me out. And I just put a sock against that to stop it from really
bleeding out of my leg and just tied a GMBN jersey around it and hobbled over to see the first aid. It looked to me just like
a really big hematoma. So a big bruise that just really balloons up. So at the first aid tent what they did was try to massage some of the blood out
of that puncture wound just so it didn’t bleed inside and get, you know, a massive hematoma. So they were really sort
of massaging that out. They strapped me up, gave me a bit of pain medication, off I went for some dinner. After dinner had a couple
of glasses of wine, I tried to walk back to my tent to get a bit of sleep. I got half way there, I realize I was in a bit of trouble. Actually phoned Blake up, so I could stick my arm
around his shoulder. In the end, Blake actually picked me up, took me back to the tent like a baby, put me in the bed and I thought I’d try
and sleep this one off. About an hour later I was in so much pain I had to go back to the medical tent, so I hobbled my way back over there. This is when things
became a bit more serious. Luckily, at the Andes Pacifico, they’ve got lots of great medical help, so Nico Thumm, the doctor there, who was a bike rider and a doctor, took a look at it. And I was in some pretty
serious pain by then and he knew straight away that it was compartment syndrome. And when he said that, I knew what it was as well. I’ve got a friend who
almost lost his leg to it. Basically, it’s sort of internal bleeding and it was inside the muscle. And, because muscles can’t expand, it can lead to real problems. It’s more complicated if you
have it in your lower leg, my one was up in my thigh. Basically it means, they’ve got to, you know, you’ve got to get surgery on it to cut it open, because that blood isn’t gonna go anywhere and it can cause some real
problems with your leg. So, got in the back of an ambulance, and I was taken, as fast as possible, down to Santiago, which took about an hour and a half. The ambulance driver
was completely bombing. He actually hit a speed bump as we got to the hospital, did a massive jump with
five of us in his ambulance, stuff went everywhere, my drip landed on the floor. It was carnage. I ended up getting emergency surgery at 5:00 A.M. that morning from a really good surgeon, Joaquim. He’s actually a bit GCN fan. So I had lots of help at the Clinica Universidad de los Andes. So really stoked on their help. Basically they cut me open from almost knee to my hip, just so they could drain that blood. And then for the next three days I had almost like cling
film wrap around my leg with a vacuum on it to
keep draining the blood. They got almost a liter
of fluid out of that leg over those three days. Then it was a case of
trying to sew it back up. So I was sat in bed for seven days now, without getting out at all. The second surgery, basically just sewed it up a little bit. And then after five days I got everything sewn back up and I had 54 staples in my leg. So I’ve got a pretty good scar from that, but that’s the worst of it over. Really, as soon as they
cut the muscle open, that’s pretty much the problem dealt with. They can get rid of that pressure and then it’s all about recovering. So now back in this sunny UK. Sort of seven weeks I think
now since the accident. The Chile trip was amazing still. It was a two and a half week trip that turned into almost a month with that time in hospital. And the advice I had from
Joaquim, the surgeon, was basically take it
super easy for three weeks, ’cause that muscles been really torn, sewn back together. If you push it too soon, you can actually get a
hernia on that muscle. So this is definitely one of those times, listen to the experts and I’ve taken it super easy for actually a month. First thing I did was get
back on my ebike actually with my son on the front. Super leisurely ride and it was great to have that
extra boost of the ebike, so it didn’t stress that muscle too much. But now, it’s time to get
back on a cross-country bike, build some of that fitness again. (upbeat music) When it comes to rehabbing, getting back on a bike, of course I always say follow the advice of the medical experts. In the past, when I was a pro, I did go and use some specialist
sports physios actually, and people that help a
lot of the pro downhillers and Rebel Athletes in the UK. Things like shoulder injuries in the past, I’ve dislocated my AC joint. And the great thing about
going to see those specialists is they can tell you what
you can and can’t do. So there definitely are
some exercises you can’t do with shoulder injuries. But they can get you
moving on things you can do and that can make a big difference. In this case I’ve just used
the National Health Service in the UK. It’s pretty good. I knew what the injury was. It was just a case of
rehabbing that muscle and taking my time. So definitely try and get
advice from the right people with different injuries and see how fast you can get moving. (upbeat music) That’s the slippiest thing
I’ve ever tried to ride across. (laughing) Oh for sake. Yeah, that was the inside line. Now we’re standing on the piss. The worst part about injuries is just all that time off the bike. It feels like I lose my
fitness really quick as well. I’ve also got a torn ACL on that side, so a torn ligament in that knee from racing downhill 15 years ago. I found in that crash that swelled up pretty bad as well. So now I’m back on the bike, just gently spinning. I find that actually really helps. It sort of gets the
blood flowing to there. And my knee’s gone down loads. So still gotta take it super gentle. I feel like this muscle aches pretty bad. You know, achy legs the
morning after a big ride. It feels like that every day anyway. So I’ve gotta go pretty
gentle on that muscle, but it’s nice to be back on the bike. Back in the wet woods in the UK, but it’s super fun to be back
on a bike and riding again. I’ve definitely had a lot
of injuries in the 20 years of racing downhill, riding enduro, just riding mountain bikes. And more than my fair share
in the last couple of years. If you’re a follower of
GMBN you probably saw, it was almost two years ago now, I had a big crash and broke my ankle, head
injury, all sorts of things. So yeah, bit of experience coming back from those injuries recently. One thing not to forget is that when you do get back on the bike, you’re gonna be a bit rusty, so take your time, try not to lose your confidence. So, you know, a big thing for me now is I don’t wanna fall off on that leg. Still pretty tender, even though its getting fixed. I really wouldn’t wanna
fall off on that leg. So I’m just gonna take my time, realize I’ve not ridden
a bike really in a month, so it’s time to go super steady. And it’ll come back. The big thing is, to begin with, you get on the bike and it feels like, “Oh, if I case that jump
on, that’s gonna hurt.” Or whatever. So take it gentle and hopefully you’ll build
your way back into it and you’ll case a jump and realize that actually it
probably isn’t gonna hurt it. So take your time, get back onto the bike, gentle as you can, and build up your confidence again. I’ve gotta say a big thanks to everyone that helped me in Chile. Blake, of course, for being a good mate and carrying me to bed. The boys at GMBN
behind-the-scenes as well. Nico, all the doctors at Andes Pacifico, Eduardo, Andes Pacifico, a massive help, so cheers to those guys. And it’s great to be back on a bike, even though it is raining, we’ll do some miles. If you wanna see that original video, from the Andes Pacifico, click down there for that one and explain what happened, if you’ve not seen that already. And if you wanna see
how to ride long miles, like I’m gonna do now, up there for some tips on that one. Thumbs up if you like
recovering from injuries. See you later.

How to Use your First Aid Kit & Contents – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

How to Use your First Aid Kit & Contents – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


In an emergency situation, you may need to act quickly so it’s important that you’re familiar with
your first aid kit to know what to use for different injuries. All workplaces, leisure centres, homes and
cars should have a first aid kit. Plasters for small cuts and grazes. A wound dressing – it’s a sterile pad attached to a bandage. They’re for larger cuts to apply pressure to
stop the bleeding. They’re easy and quick to apply in an emergency. Roller bandages are long, thin bandages rolled up. They’re used to hold dressings in place, to
apply pressure and stop bleeding. You can also use them to hold ice packs
in place to reduce the swelling. A triangular bandage is a large triangular-shaped piece of cloth. It can be used as a bandage. Also it can be used as a dressing if it’s sterile to cover a large wound or burn. Disposable gloves reduce the risk of infection between you and the casualty. Always wear
them, if you have them, when dressing a wound. Also use them when dealing with any bodily fluid or waste. Face shields, or pocket masks, can be used to reduce infection when giving rescue breaths. Alcohol-free cleansing wipes are used to clean the skin around the wound. Gauze swabs can be used as dressings padding or swabs to clean around the
wound. Sticky or adhesive tape is used to hold dressings in place or to secure the loose ends of bandages. Scissors are used to cut somebody’s clothing
so that you can get to the wound. They can also be used to cut sticky tape to
the required length. Some other common items that might be
useful are cling film or clean plastic bags for
dressing burns and scalds. Use alcohol gel to clean your hands
if you don’t have any water. A blanket, survival bag, torch, and
whistle are useful for helping people outdoors. A warning triangle and a high-visibility
jacket are useful in the car for dealing with road accidents. So remember: make sure you have a first aid kit and make sure you know how to use it.

CMH ER Tips: First Aid Kit

CMH ER Tips: First Aid Kit


(upbeat music) – Hi, my name is Becky and I’m part of the
Citrus Memorial ER team. It’s always a really good idea for every household to
have a first aid kit, so today I wanna show
you the essential items that you will need for
your supplies for your first aid kit. The most obvious supply
you will need is bandages. You want various sizes
of bandaids and gauze. Also you’ll want antibiotic cream and Hydrocortisone Cream
as part of your supplies. Tweezers and Tylenol and
a cold compress are also must-haves. Also, make sure that every
member of your household knows where your first aid kit
is located and always remember to
periodically check the expiration dates of the medication that
include with your supplies. With all of these supplies
in place, you are now ready to treat basic medical
emergencies at home. But for medical emergencies that require medical professionals, always remember you can
count on the team here at Citrus Memorial Hospital.

How To Do CPR – Animated Video

How To Do CPR – Animated Video


Hello, in this HealthSketch, we want to talk
to you about CPR, which stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. We use CPR when someone has collapsed and
is not breathing, because it can keep people alive until emergency services arrive. Learning these simple life-saving skills is
as easy as ABC – all you have to remember is the “Doctor’s ABC”. D is for Danger: First, look around carefully
to make sure the area is safe for yourself and others before approaching. R is for Response: Shake them gently by the
shoulders and ask them loudly “Are you alright?” If there is no response, you need to… S: Shout for help, as any assistance will
be helpful A is for Airway: Gently tilt the head back
like this, to open up the airway. B is for Breathing: Look, Listen and Feel
for signs of normal breathing: LOOK for normal chest movements, LISTEN for normal breathing
sounds and try to FEEL their breath against your face. Do this for no more than 10 seconds. If there is no sign of breathing, or if they
are breathing in an unusual, noisy way, we need to start CPR. First, make sure that an ambulance is on its
way. If you have someone else with you, ask them
to make the call. Putting the phone on speaker mode is useful
as the ambulance service can talk you through the steps. C is for Circulation: Circulation means the
flow of blood around the body, and when the heart stops pumping, we need to take over
this role by pushing down hard and fast on the chest. Start by placing the heel of one hand at the
centre of the person’s chest and interlock your fingers like this. With arms straightened, press down hard and
fast, letting the chest come back up fully each time. Fast means around 2 times every second (metronome
sound) and hard means that the chest needs to go down by about 5 centimetres. This might sound a lot but you do need to
push hard for it to be effective. If you have been trained, you can give 2 ‘rescue
breaths’ after every 30 compressions, as this helps provide some oxygen. However, if you have not been trained or are
not comfortable, just keep going with ‘Hands-only’ continuous chest compressions. If someone else is with you, swap over if
you begin to feel tired, and don’t stop until either a health professional takes over,
or the person is definitely breathing normally. Sometimes, we can add another step – ‘D’. D is for Defibrillation, which is about delivering
a shock to restart the heartbeat. Some public areas and workplaces have an easy-to-use
defibrillator on site, called an Automatic External Defibrillator, or AED. Automatic means that it is the machine that
decides what to do, so you can’t go wrong, and it even talks you through the steps. If there is no AED available, keep going with
CPR until the ambulance arrives. That’s it! So to recap: remember DR’S ABC and if you
have it, D. That’s D for Danger, R for response. S for shout for help, A for Airway, B for
Breathing, C for Circulation and D for Defibrillation. In this HealthSketch, we’ve shown you the
simple steps you can take to help someone who has collapsed, is not breathing, or not
breathing normally. Why not take a training course to practice
these steps. Share this video with friends and family to
make sure we all know what to do.