Axon regeneration in response to nervous system injury

Axon regeneration in response to nervous system injury


I’m Alex Byrne and I’m an assistant
professor in the Department of Neurobiology I started out being really
interested in genetics with different genetics class in undergrad and that led
me to pursue a graduate degree at the University of Toronto where I studied
genetics again and at the end of my graduate degree I saw a talk on axon
regeneration so it was amazing to me that you could use this tiny worm to
understand how to influence the nervous system to regrow after injury and so we’re looking for genes that
control how an axon can regrow after it’s been injured and so to do that we
study the genetics of this time you little worm called C elegans the beauty
of the system that it has a conserved genome so most of its genes are the same
as ours it also has a really well characterized nervous system and it’s
transparent and so that means that we can take these little worms put them on
a microscope shoot a laser at them to cut one individual neuron and then
manipulate their genome all in a live animal to see how we can get an axon to
regrow or why is it that a maximum doesn’t the ultimate goal of the lab is to not
only understand how the nervous system response to injury but we hope that in
characterizing that process what we find may help develop future strategies for
repair and be injured or the disease nervous system so for example some of
the spinal cord injury or any kind of nervous system disease

Ade Edmondson’s cervical fracture – Would I Lie to You? [HD][CC]

Ade Edmondson’s cervical fracture – Would I Lie to You? [HD][CC]


“When I broke my neck at school all
I was given was an aspirin.” – David’s team.
– What happened? How did you break
your neck? – Erm… – LAUGHTER – Don’t worry, we can lose that
pause in the edit! – LAUGHTER – As a young man I was in the gym
team. – Right.
– At school. We were doing a display for…
Whatever you do… Founder’s Day, something like that
you know. I had to do a somersault over a box. A box? A horse. – Yeah, yeah, a horse box.
– The bit… – One of the…
– It wasn’t that big.
– No, a vault.
– Yes. So I jumped over one of those and was supposed to do a somersault,
but I did one and a half. – And landed on your head. – He’s very clever, isn’t he, that
one? – So what happened then, Ade? You
came crashing to the floor? – There was a very loud noise. – Your neck breaking made a noise? – Yes. Why wouldn’t a neck breaking
make a lot of noise? – That’s a good point.
– Wouldn’t you scream anyway? – But the noise would precede the
scream. – But on the way down, on the way to
hitting your neck, presumably you’d be shouting out
something like, “Ahhh!” – No because actually there’s
sometimes a delay before the pain
actually arrives. – Yeah, but there still might be
alarm as you see the chances of you
saving yourself from your neck
breaking. It’s like people in an aeroplane
that’s crashing, they’re probably screaming and you
don’t go, “Well, you’re fine at the moment.” – LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE So you’ve hit the ground, you fall
to the floor, what happens then? – I was in a great deal of pain.
– Was there a gym teacher present? – There was. He was Scottish. Jock
Watt, his name was. – LAUGHTER – No, no, no.
– That was his…
– Jock Watt. – You had a teacher called Jock
Watt? So what did Watt do? – One of the first things he did… ..was he put out his cigarette. – LAUGHTER – Erm, no…
– On the head of a nearby child. – LAUGHTER – Watt was there…
– Where? – In the display.
– Watt was in the display? What? Part of it? – We’re quite small schoolboys.
– Cheer leaders. – So there’s a kind of teacher to
catch you.
– Oh, yes. – Or half catch you, half catch…
– What, somebody dropped you? – You bounce over the thing and you
sort of… – Is that after he dropped you? Is
that when he went… – LAUGHTER – I was carried off the field of
display. – By what?
– By… – LAUGHTER – And taken to the sick bay… ..where I was given an aspirin. – So where was Watt now? LAUGHTER – I wish his name wasn’t Watt. – Why? LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE – Oh, dear. – So was it evident to you from the
start that you’d broken your neck? – Er, no. I suffered a great deal of pain for
very many years… ..and didn’t really find out about
the… ..crushed vertebrae… ..until… – Yesterday. – Until a few years after. – So what are you thinking? Are you
thinking that it could be true? – Well, the thing is, I have been
observing him, as I do, and he doesn’t have full movement of
his neck. Look, look at that. – Wow! How long have you been observing him
for, Claude? – Yeah, you see. – What do you think?
– I reckon it’s true now because of the whole neck thing.
– You think it’s true because of inhibited neck movement.
– I do, indeed. – We’re going to say it’s true. – Ade Edmondson, was it true or was
it a lie? – It’s… ..true.
– Yeah! – Yes, it’s true, Ade was given an
aspirin for a broken neck.