How to Use your First Aid Kit & Contents – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

How to Use your First Aid Kit & Contents – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


In an emergency situation, you may need to act quickly so it’s important that you’re familiar with
your first aid kit to know what to use for different injuries. All workplaces, leisure centres, homes and
cars should have a first aid kit. Plasters for small cuts and grazes. A wound dressing – it’s a sterile pad attached to a bandage. They’re for larger cuts to apply pressure to
stop the bleeding. They’re easy and quick to apply in an emergency. Roller bandages are long, thin bandages rolled up. They’re used to hold dressings in place, to
apply pressure and stop bleeding. You can also use them to hold ice packs
in place to reduce the swelling. A triangular bandage is a large triangular-shaped piece of cloth. It can be used as a bandage. Also it can be used as a dressing if it’s sterile to cover a large wound or burn. Disposable gloves reduce the risk of infection between you and the casualty. Always wear
them, if you have them, when dressing a wound. Also use them when dealing with any bodily fluid or waste. Face shields, or pocket masks, can be used to reduce infection when giving rescue breaths. Alcohol-free cleansing wipes are used to clean the skin around the wound. Gauze swabs can be used as dressings padding or swabs to clean around the
wound. Sticky or adhesive tape is used to hold dressings in place or to secure the loose ends of bandages. Scissors are used to cut somebody’s clothing
so that you can get to the wound. They can also be used to cut sticky tape to
the required length. Some other common items that might be
useful are cling film or clean plastic bags for
dressing burns and scalds. Use alcohol gel to clean your hands
if you don’t have any water. A blanket, survival bag, torch, and
whistle are useful for helping people outdoors. A warning triangle and a high-visibility
jacket are useful in the car for dealing with road accidents. So remember: make sure you have a first aid kit and make sure you know how to use it.

CMH ER Tips: First Aid Kit

CMH ER Tips: First Aid Kit


(upbeat music) – Hi, my name is Becky and I’m part of the
Citrus Memorial ER team. It’s always a really good idea for every household to
have a first aid kit, so today I wanna show
you the essential items that you will need for
your supplies for your first aid kit. The most obvious supply
you will need is bandages. You want various sizes
of bandaids and gauze. Also you’ll want antibiotic cream and Hydrocortisone Cream
as part of your supplies. Tweezers and Tylenol and
a cold compress are also must-haves. Also, make sure that every
member of your household knows where your first aid kit
is located and always remember to
periodically check the expiration dates of the medication that
include with your supplies. With all of these supplies
in place, you are now ready to treat basic medical
emergencies at home. But for medical emergencies that require medical professionals, always remember you can
count on the team here at Citrus Memorial Hospital.

How To Do CPR – Animated Video

How To Do CPR – Animated Video


Hello, in this HealthSketch, we want to talk
to you about CPR, which stands for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. We use CPR when someone has collapsed and
is not breathing, because it can keep people alive until emergency services arrive. Learning these simple life-saving skills is
as easy as ABC – all you have to remember is the “Doctor’s ABC”. D is for Danger: First, look around carefully
to make sure the area is safe for yourself and others before approaching. R is for Response: Shake them gently by the
shoulders and ask them loudly “Are you alright?” If there is no response, you need to… S: Shout for help, as any assistance will
be helpful A is for Airway: Gently tilt the head back
like this, to open up the airway. B is for Breathing: Look, Listen and Feel
for signs of normal breathing: LOOK for normal chest movements, LISTEN for normal breathing
sounds and try to FEEL their breath against your face. Do this for no more than 10 seconds. If there is no sign of breathing, or if they
are breathing in an unusual, noisy way, we need to start CPR. First, make sure that an ambulance is on its
way. If you have someone else with you, ask them
to make the call. Putting the phone on speaker mode is useful
as the ambulance service can talk you through the steps. C is for Circulation: Circulation means the
flow of blood around the body, and when the heart stops pumping, we need to take over
this role by pushing down hard and fast on the chest. Start by placing the heel of one hand at the
centre of the person’s chest and interlock your fingers like this. With arms straightened, press down hard and
fast, letting the chest come back up fully each time. Fast means around 2 times every second (metronome
sound) and hard means that the chest needs to go down by about 5 centimetres. This might sound a lot but you do need to
push hard for it to be effective. If you have been trained, you can give 2 ‘rescue
breaths’ after every 30 compressions, as this helps provide some oxygen. However, if you have not been trained or are
not comfortable, just keep going with ‘Hands-only’ continuous chest compressions. If someone else is with you, swap over if
you begin to feel tired, and don’t stop until either a health professional takes over,
or the person is definitely breathing normally. Sometimes, we can add another step – ‘D’. D is for Defibrillation, which is about delivering
a shock to restart the heartbeat. Some public areas and workplaces have an easy-to-use
defibrillator on site, called an Automatic External Defibrillator, or AED. Automatic means that it is the machine that
decides what to do, so you can’t go wrong, and it even talks you through the steps. If there is no AED available, keep going with
CPR until the ambulance arrives. That’s it! So to recap: remember DR’S ABC and if you
have it, D. That’s D for Danger, R for response. S for shout for help, A for Airway, B for
Breathing, C for Circulation and D for Defibrillation. In this HealthSketch, we’ve shown you the
simple steps you can take to help someone who has collapsed, is not breathing, or not
breathing normally. Why not take a training course to practice
these steps. Share this video with friends and family to
make sure we all know what to do.