Dog First Aid : Tips for Treating Kennel Cough in Dogs


What do you do if you fear that your dog has
come down with kennel cough? A
common sign of kennel cough is a hacking cough that your dog would exhibit. It sounds almost
like they are trying to clear their throat. A mild case you will have some hacking, throat
clearing action from the dog. You might have a slightly high temperature and you might
have a little bit of lethargy. If the case of kennel cough is more severe, the dog might
actually hack up phlegm. As it is coughing, it is hacking up phlegm. More serious cases
can result in hospitalization for the dog. So how do you manage this? What do you do?
If your dog is coughing and the cough is persistent and it is especially worse at night, one thing
you can do is give your dog cough syrup. So how do you give your dog cough syrup? You can different size syringes; this one
here goes up to 1/2 tablespoon.

Dog First Aid

Dog First Aid


Whether you’re hiking or hunting, spending time outdoors can also be an opportunity to spend time with man’s best friend. Obedience training is a must, but so is planning ahead. You’ll need to pack for his needs as well as your own. There’s no reason your dog can’t carry his own luggage. And the most important item in his pack will be his own first aid kits. You can make your own. Here’s what you’ll need. First, the essentials: a blanket, your vet’s phone number… gauze bandage, which can double as a tourniquet first aid tape, gauze sponges, q-tips, non-stick telfa pads, saline solution, tweezers or forceps, and blunt-end scissors. When you’re in the field, you’ll need more: styptic pencil to stop bleeding, topical wound disinfectant, antibiotic ointment, benadryl, buffered aspirin (never give a dog tylenol or ibuprofen. Both are toxic), pepto bismol tablets, new skin liquid bandage for patching abrasions on pads, syrup of ipecac, and wire cutters. Even the best dog can bite when he’s in pain, so remember you can use the gauze bandage to make a muzzle to use while you’re examining the injury or moving an injured dog. Most field injuries like lacerations of ears, pads or tail tips, torn claw, or shallow wounds can be treated on site, with a possible follow-up with your vet. But if your dog breaks a bone, gets bitten by a snake, or gets foxtails in his nose or ears, you might want to cut your trip short and seek professional care.

“This Relief Came In Time” after Hurricane Dorian

“This Relief Came In Time” after Hurricane Dorian


Today we are here with Direct Relief. The
donations that came in for the persons down at our hospitals in Grand Bahama
and our connection in Abaco. This relief came in time and very very timely
because Direct Relief knows exactly what we needed and all of the medical and
surgical and pharmaceutical items are on point. They are going to bring relief to
the people of Grand Bahama and Abaco and so on behalf of the Bahamas government
as all of the people in the Bahamas, we say thank you very much for much needed supplies that will go a long way in bringing relief to our patients and
institutions.

Mental Health First Aid – Veterans

Mental Health First Aid – Veterans


It can be tough to see someone struggle, and it can be hard to know what to say. You can learn to choose the best words
to support those in need with free mental health first aid training.

Dog First Aid : How to Care for a Dog’s Torn Toe Nail

Dog First Aid : How to Care for a Dog’s Torn Toe Nail


So I am going to demonstrate for you how you
would bandage a torn toenail from a dog. We are working with Ty here and he has torn his
right dewclaw. Dewclaw is the nail that is upside on the leg and he has torn that completely
off. So first thing that we want to do is you can see that the hair around the dewclaw
is a little bit matted and the first thing we need to do is clean that area up. We need
to brush that hair out. Now you can shave the area if you want to. I am trying to save
the coat so I am just going to brush this area out. It is going to tender and sore so
I am being very careful to hold the hair away from the skin so I don’t hit the skin with
the brush
and it is actually matted like this because he has been licking it. Ty stop. I am going
to expose the area. Put your head down. Okay, put your head down. Okay you can see that
it is a little bit red and raw here, the area that he has been licking; the area around
the dewclaw that is missing and in fact I will scissor the hair away from this area;
make it a little bit easier to work. Okay he is very obvious sensitive in this area
so I am going to work carefully.
So this is the dewclaw here. It is a little bit swollen. The dewclaw itself is actually
missing. We are going to clean this area out here. I am going go use some Betadyne from
my first aid kit; some Betadyne and cotton. If you can leave a wound like this open for
the air to heal, that is always better but if the dog is worrying it, licking it and
causing it to swell up like this then we really do need to close it off. Before we close it
off though, I want to clean it out.

How to Make a First Aid Kit : Electrolyte to Include in Your First Aid Kit

How to Make a First Aid Kit : Electrolyte to Include in Your First Aid Kit


For certain trips for example if you’re going
into the dessert for a hiking up in the mountains, in the dessert, if your going for long long
camping trips in areas where it’s very humid or hot and you are doing a lot of sweating
or even if you’re just doing some exercise that causes you a lot of sweating and loosing
a lot of fluid then you want to replenish your electrolytes, that’s your sodium, your
potassium, your glucose in your body to prevent any dehydration. So, if you can get hold of
these packages or anything that this is, for example, is called oral rehydration salts
that would be very good to include into your kit. I will show you how to use this but you
can also get this in tablet form, too. So, basically tablet form is a compressed form
of the loose powder and this is the loose powder form. And, in this package it contains
sodium chloride, which is the chemical name for salt, potassium chloride, and glucose.
So,here it says, directions: How to Use. Very simple, it says dissolve in 1 liter drinking
water. But, for example, sometimes kids don’t like to drink things that taste icky, so you
can also put it in orange juice, any kind of juice, fruit juice, and let it dissolve
in there and you really wouldn’t tast it at all. So, it’s, the kids are more inclined
to drink it. But, anyway here, it’s very simple, I’ll show you. You just get a liter of water,
but here we just got a sample, a cup of water, and of course this is when a pair of scissors
comes in handy because it you don’t have a pair of scissors I guess you’ll have to resort
to using your teeth. But, which I am going to do but I don’t have strong teeth. So, if
we, if we, if we can find a pair of scissors, which we should have, oh, here it is, so here
see, pair of scissors, I told you is very important item. If you don’t have strong teeth
like me so, very easy, open it up, and here we go. We will then just pour into the water
and give it a stir and this is when if you have a depressor if you don’t have any sort
of like catheter, you can always improvise, that’s why it’s always good if you can get
one of these tongue depressors in your kit because you can always use it as a stirer.
See, so these things in the kit, these items, you can improvise and use them, it’s like
survival techniques so here we go, this is my stirer and let it dissolve and I’m going
to taste it. See what it tastes like. I haven’t tried this brand, let’s see. See what it tastes
like, it’s better to have ice.
Yes, it’s better to put into orange juice or something that’s sweet because it’s like
drinking a pot of salt. But, it’s good for you though when you’re dehydrated. You don’t
want to end up in the ER, right, so, alright, there we go. Rehydration.