Elbow Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo

Elbow Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo. I’m just
chillin out by the fireplace on a lazy rainy day.Who’s that at the door?
Hey, Nick, come on in. Come sit in my fancy chair. I met Nick at NextUp YouTube class of 2017
How you doing? I’m doing pretty good. How are you Doctor Jo? I’m doing great. Tell us a little bit
about your channel. Alright so my channel, we throw cards. So
what that means, give cards a little flick, throw them around. And the issue
that I run in to, is my subscribers and I, we run it to elbow pain. Ah yeah. All that throwing. I could see that that would be a very repetitive painful thing.
You know what? I think I’ve got some stretches and exercise for that. Yeah?
Let’s check them out right here. Whoa! It came all the way through. So with Nick’s repetitive movements of throwing those
cards, he gets a lot of pain in the elbow area. And sometimes it’s called tennis
elbow, sometimes called iPad elbow, and so now we can call it cards elbow. But a
great way to work these muscles, these muscles start at the elbow, but they come
all the way down to the wrist and they actually do a lot of movement at the
wrist, so those flicking motions that he does probably causes a lot of that to.
So we’re just going to stretch out these muscles all the way through. A good way
to start is to get those flexors and extensors by putting your arm straight
out if you put your fist, if you put your hands in and make a fist, and come up,
you’ll get a little bit of a stretch under here. If you want more of a stretch
put your fingers up into a stop sign position, and then you can put a little
bit of pressure over it this way. You should really feel that one underneath.
because you want to stretch both sides. So you’re going to hold this stretch for
about 30 seconds, and then do three of those. But you can alternate back and
forth to get those extensors by coming down this way. This is the opposite, if
your fingers are open it’s not quite as much of a stretch, but if you make a fist
you’re going to get a lot bigger stretch there, and then you can put a little bit
of pressure over that way. So I like to alternate back and forth through my 30
seconds and then a total of three on each side. So coming
up, doing that stretch, but really hold it for that 30 seconds if you can, and then
coming down and holding that stretch. Once you get those wrist flexors and
extensors stretched out a little bit, you can stretch your supination and
pronation, and the way I like to do that is grab a hammer or something that’s a
little top-heavy because that helps you get a little bit of an overpressure
stretch. Keep your elbow bent by your side because if you do it straight out
you’re going, to you’re going to rotate your whole shoulder, and we really want
to get down here at the elbow and the wrist. So bend that elbow, keep it by your
side, and then hold the hammer and just go down this way which is in the
supination. Hold it for about three to five seconds, and then come back the
other way into pronation. And so the little bit of the weight on the hammer
pulls it just a little bit more to give you that stretch going back and forth. So
it’s a nice little stretch it’s also a nice little exercise as well. I would
just start off with about ten of these on each side, and you can go smoothly or
just holding it a little bit. So after you get those stretched out a little bit,
you can go into doing some band work to help strengthen the area. There different
color bands are the different hardness of resistance, usually the yellow one is
the lightest and the red is the next lightest, so you might want to start off
with the lightest, but just getting some resistance in there to start building up
those muscles a little bit. And a lot of times people ask, well it’s sore, do I want
to do that, but with resistive bands, it works really well to kind of help get
that irritation out of there as long as you’re not overdoing it. If you want to
place your hand on a table or something, you can, or you can kind of hold your
elbow here, or if you feel good enough, you can just kind of hold it up into
this position. We’re going to start off with our palm down, and you just want to
do the movement at the wrist, but that’s really going to work those elbow muscles
up there as well, so pulling up this way, and then come all
the way down. So you want to come all the way through the movement, you don’t want
to stop here, you want to come all the way down, and then pull up and then nice
and slow back down. So again just starting off with about ten of these, you
don’t want to overdo it and irritate it even more, but you definitely want to
work it out and try and get that inflammation out of there. After you
do ten that way, turn it over. A lot of times I like to kind of get the band in
the middle area and then just go the opposite way. So now you’re going to curl
up and then slowly come back down. So same thing, just nice slow controlled
do about ten of those, but make sure when you come up, you’re not just
letting it plop back down. Control that band because you don’t want to injure
anything more, and then this coming down is equally as important, so make sure
that smooth control motion. Then next you’re going to come up into this
position where your thumb is up, and then you’re going to go what’s called the
radial deviation, which is pulling up this way, and then coming back down. So
again still doing that full movement all the way down, all the way up, and making
sure that you’re working the band, don’t let the band work you. And then the last
one with the band, it’s going to be an ulnar deviation, and the way I like to do
that is just hold it in both hands here with your thumb pointing towards each
other, and then you’re just going to take it and go out this way. So again,
controlling the band, nice smooth motion, going all the way out, coming all the way
in, and then just doing about ten of those, and really just with 10 of each
you’ll you’ll be able to feel that you’re working those muscles. So after
you work those you can take something like a towel, you can take a ball, you can
even just take a little small foam roll, and do some squeezes. So now you’re just
going to kind of squeeze in, hold it for about three to five seconds, and then
come out. So if you don’t have anything like a
roll you can just roll up a towel if you want to, but if you have something like a
tennis ball or Nerf ball, that works really well for kind of squeezing,
holding it for a little bit, and then let it go. And again you’ll be able to feel
that it’s working all these muscles here. And then so the last exercise is going
to be with a band, and then we’ll do some nice massages and stuff at the end. So
with the rubber band, take it, it doesn’t have to be fancy rubber band, it can just
be any rubber band, and put it around your fingers. And then with your fingers,
you’re just going to kind of open them up this way, and then slowly come back in.
So it’s the same thing with the band, when you come out don’t just let them
pop it back in, really control it coming back in. So you’re going to go out, and
then nice and slow back in. I just do maybe about ten of those as well. So
after you get all those exercises, you’re probably feeling a little bit, you’ve
worked those muscles, they feel nice and warm, and then to make it feel good
afterwards, you can do a massage on the area. So just getting some cream or some
lotion, but all these muscles at the wrist and elbow kind of come up here, and
they come up on this side too ,but probably the the motion especially that
Nick feels with that spin motion of the card is here, so just getting some lotion
to help make it easier to rub, but just doing some circular motions around this
area right here. Some people like to get a massager you can do that because the
vibration works really well too, but I also think just giving it a nice massage
on the on the muscles and the tendons that come up and attach right here, is
really nice as well. And if you use lotion, it will be a
little bit smoother, it’s not as much friction, but just to give you an idea
making little kind of circle motions right along that area in that elbow
joint right in there. And then so after you do this, you can do this for about 2
or 3 minutes, just to get it nice and calmed back down, and then my favorite at
the very end is an ice massage. So just grab an ice cube, and then I’ll
show you that real quick. So all you need is an ice cube.
Sometimes if you want a little bit more, you can take those little little cups
and put some ice in it, and then once it freezes you can tear the cup away, but I
like just having an ice cube kind of wrapped up in a paper towel. So what you
want to do with an ice massage is really only do about six minutes. Since it’s
direct ice on the skin, this is not a ten to fifteen minute kind of thing, but just
directly on there you’re going to start off really light, and you’re just going
to do some circles. And the reason you want to go really light is because at
first you’re really going to feel it’s going to feel cold, and it’s going to
feel burney and stingy, but if you can tolerate about a minute of that, then
it’ll kind of go numb, and once it goes numb, then you’re going to start putting
a little more pressure on it and doing the massage part. So really just getting
around in that area, that that area that’s irritated, those tendons maybe like a
tendinitis or the bursa a bursitis, or even the tennis elbow
which is epicondylitis, but just really working that area. The more it gets numb,
push harder, you really want to get that massage in there, you want that
irritation to get out of there, but you really only want to do this for
about six minutes. You don’t want to do it too much more than that,
and so I won’t go the whole six minutes, but that is what you would do. Alright
so there you have it. There you go, oh, those are your stretching exercise for a
little bit of elbow pain. Hey yeah, yeah yeah, so don’t forget to subscribe to Nick’s
channel. Don’t forget to subscribe to Ask Doctor Jo. And remember, be safe, have fun. And I hope feel better soon. Yeah!

Elbow Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo. I’m just
chillin out by the fireplace on a lazy rainy day.Who’s that at the door?
Hey, Nick, come on in. Come sit in my fancy chair. I met Nick at NextUp YouTube class of 2017
How you doing? I’m doing pretty good. How are you Doctor Jo? I’m doing great. Tell us a little bit
about your channel. Alright so my channel, we throw cards. So
what that means, give cards a little flick, throw them around. And the issue
that I run in to, is my subscribers and I, we run it to elbow pain. Ah yeah. All that throwing. I could see that that would be a very repetitive painful thing.
You know what? I think I’ve got some stretches and exercise for that. Yeah?
Let’s check them out right here. Whoa! It came all the way through. So with Nick’s repetitive movements of throwing those
cards, he gets a lot of pain in the elbow area. And sometimes it’s called tennis
elbow, sometimes called iPad elbow, and so now we can call it cards elbow. But a
great way to work these muscles, these muscles start at the elbow, but they come
all the way down to the wrist and they actually do a lot of movement at the
wrist, so those flicking motions that he does probably causes a lot of that to.
So we’re just going to stretch out these muscles all the way through. A good way
to start is to get those flexors and extensors by putting your arm straight
out if you put your fist, if you put your hands in and make a fist, and come up,
you’ll get a little bit of a stretch under here. If you want more of a stretch
put your fingers up into a stop sign position, and then you can put a little
bit of pressure over it this way. You should really feel that one underneath.
because you want to stretch both sides. So you’re going to hold this stretch for
about 30 seconds, and then do three of those. But you can alternate back and
forth to get those extensors by coming down this way. This is the opposite, if
your fingers are open it’s not quite as much of a stretch, but if you make a fist
you’re going to get a lot bigger stretch there, and then you can put a little bit
of pressure over that way. So I like to alternate back and forth through my 30
seconds and then a total of three on each side. So coming
up, doing that stretch, but really hold it for that 30 seconds if you can, and then
coming down and holding that stretch. Once you get those wrist flexors and
extensors stretched out a little bit, you can stretch your supination and
pronation, and the way I like to do that is grab a hammer or something that’s a
little top-heavy because that helps you get a little bit of an overpressure
stretch. Keep your elbow bent by your side because if you do it straight out
you’re going, to you’re going to rotate your whole shoulder, and we really want
to get down here at the elbow and the wrist. So bend that elbow, keep it by your
side, and then hold the hammer and just go down this way which is in the
supination. Hold it for about three to five seconds, and then come back the
other way into pronation. And so the little bit of the weight on the hammer
pulls it just a little bit more to give you that stretch going back and forth. So
it’s a nice little stretch it’s also a nice little exercise as well. I would
just start off with about ten of these on each side, and you can go smoothly or
just holding it a little bit. So after you get those stretched out a little bit,
you can go into doing some band work to help strengthen the area. There different
color bands are the different hardness of resistance, usually the yellow one is
the lightest and the red is the next lightest, so you might want to start off
with the lightest, but just getting some resistance in there to start building up
those muscles a little bit. And a lot of times people ask, well it’s sore, do I want
to do that, but with resistive bands, it works really well to kind of help get
that irritation out of there as long as you’re not overdoing it. If you want to
place your hand on a table or something, you can, or you can kind of hold your
elbow here, or if you feel good enough, you can just kind of hold it up into
this position. We’re going to start off with our palm down, and you just want to
do the movement at the wrist, but that’s really going to work those elbow muscles
up there as well, so pulling up this way, and then come all
the way down. So you want to come all the way through the movement, you don’t want
to stop here, you want to come all the way down, and then pull up and then nice
and slow back down. So again just starting off with about ten of these, you
don’t want to overdo it and irritate it even more, but you definitely want to
work it out and try and get that inflammation out of there. After you
do ten that way, turn it over. A lot of times I like to kind of get the band in
the middle area and then just go the opposite way. So now you’re going to curl
up and then slowly come back down. So same thing, just nice slow controlled
do about ten of those, but make sure when you come up, you’re not just
letting it plop back down. Control that band because you don’t want to injure
anything more, and then this coming down is equally as important, so make sure
that smooth control motion. Then next you’re going to come up into this
position where your thumb is up, and then you’re going to go what’s called the
radial deviation, which is pulling up this way, and then coming back down. So
again still doing that full movement all the way down, all the way up, and making
sure that you’re working the band, don’t let the band work you. And then the last
one with the band, it’s going to be an ulnar deviation, and the way I like to do
that is just hold it in both hands here with your thumb pointing towards each
other, and then you’re just going to take it and go out this way. So again,
controlling the band, nice smooth motion, going all the way out, coming all the way
in, and then just doing about ten of those, and really just with 10 of each
you’ll you’ll be able to feel that you’re working those muscles. So after
you work those you can take something like a towel, you can take a ball, you can
even just take a little small foam roll, and do some squeezes. So now you’re just
going to kind of squeeze in, hold it for about three to five seconds, and then
come out. So if you don’t have anything like a
roll you can just roll up a towel if you want to, but if you have something like a
tennis ball or Nerf ball, that works really well for kind of squeezing,
holding it for a little bit, and then let it go. And again you’ll be able to feel
that it’s working all these muscles here. And then so the last exercise is going
to be with a band, and then we’ll do some nice massages and stuff at the end. So
with the rubber band, take it, it doesn’t have to be fancy rubber band, it can just
be any rubber band, and put it around your fingers. And then with your fingers,
you’re just going to kind of open them up this way, and then slowly come back in.
So it’s the same thing with the band, when you come out don’t just let them
pop it back in, really control it coming back in. So you’re going to go out, and
then nice and slow back in. I just do maybe about ten of those as well. So
after you get all those exercises, you’re probably feeling a little bit, you’ve
worked those muscles, they feel nice and warm, and then to make it feel good
afterwards, you can do a massage on the area. So just getting some cream or some
lotion, but all these muscles at the wrist and elbow kind of come up here, and
they come up on this side too ,but probably the the motion especially that
Nick feels with that spin motion of the card is here, so just getting some lotion
to help make it easier to rub, but just doing some circular motions around this
area right here. Some people like to get a massager you can do that because the
vibration works really well too, but I also think just giving it a nice massage
on the on the muscles and the tendons that come up and attach right here, is
really nice as well. And if you use lotion, it will be a
little bit smoother, it’s not as much friction, but just to give you an idea
making little kind of circle motions right along that area in that elbow
joint right in there. And then so after you do this, you can do this for about 2
or 3 minutes, just to get it nice and calmed back down, and then my favorite at
the very end is an ice massage. So just grab an ice cube, and then I’ll
show you that real quick. So all you need is an ice cube.
Sometimes if you want a little bit more, you can take those little little cups
and put some ice in it, and then once it freezes you can tear the cup away, but I
like just having an ice cube kind of wrapped up in a paper towel. So what you
want to do with an ice massage is really only do about six minutes. Since it’s
direct ice on the skin, this is not a ten to fifteen minute kind of thing, but just
directly on there you’re going to start off really light, and you’re just going
to do some circles. And the reason you want to go really light is because at
first you’re really going to feel it’s going to feel cold, and it’s going to
feel burney and stingy, but if you can tolerate about a minute of that, then
it’ll kind of go numb, and once it goes numb, then you’re going to start putting
a little more pressure on it and doing the massage part. So really just getting
around in that area, that that area that’s irritated, those tendons maybe like a
tendinitis or the bursa a bursitis, or even the tennis elbow
which is epicondylitis, but just really working that area. The more it gets numb,
push harder, you really want to get that massage in there, you want that
irritation to get out of there, but you really only want to do this for
about six minutes. You don’t want to do it too much more than that,
and so I won’t go the whole six minutes, but that is what you would do. Alright
so there you have it. There you go, oh, those are your stretching exercise for a
little bit of elbow pain. Hey yeah, yeah yeah, so don’t forget to subscribe to Nick’s
channel. Don’t forget to subscribe to Ask Doctor Jo. And remember, be safe, have fun. And I hope feel better soon. Yeah!

Neck Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises  – Ask Doctor Jo

Neck Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Oh, Oh! Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo, and I’ve got my dynamic duo Wonder Remy and Wonder Jo, and today we’re going to show you some stretches and exercises to help relieve neck pain. So let’s get started. Are you ready? Are you ready? Let’s do it! So the first set of stretches for the neck are just going to be active range of motion. So you’re not putting pressure on it, you’re just getting that neck loosened up. So first you’re going to do a rotation side to side. So this one’s going to be a little bit of a continuous motion. You can pause for about two to three seconds on each side, but you’re just getting those muscles moving. So you want to start off just do about five on each side with that little pause, just to get those neck muscles right there warmed up a little bit. After you do the rotation side to side, then you’re going to do a side bending. With the side bending, you’re taking your ear towards your shoulder, but you’re not bringing your shoulder up to your ear. You want to keep your shoulders down and relaxed and then just side bend over trying to touch that ear to your shoulder, and again just hold it for about three to five seconds, and then come back to the other side. Try and keep your head in a fairly neutral position. Sometimes people kind of go down like that, but then you’re just changing the muscle that you’re that you’re working and stretching, so try and keep that head fairly forward when you side bend, so again just about five on each side just to get it loosened up. After you get those loosened up, then you’re gonna do a chin tuck. With the chin tuck, it’s not going downwards it’s tucking it back towards the back of your head. So again you want to keep your head level and you want to just push that chin backward, so you’re making a whole lot of little chins there, but I like using my finger as a target because then you can kind of see how much of a stretch you get. So hold it for about five seconds here, and then come back and you can see that now there’s a little space between my fingers which means I’m I’m working those muscles out a little bit, so that forward head movement that you might have then straightens back up. So again hold it for about five seconds, relax, and do about five of those. So now that you got all of those muscles warmed up a little bit, you’re going to go into some stretches. So now you’re going to do an upper trap stretch which is those muscles in the back up there. Those ones that are on the top of that diamond, and what they do is hold everything together so they get stressed out a lot, and they have a lot of tension in them. So if you want to stretch the right side, you’re going to put your right hand underneath your bottom, and what that does is it just kind of sets that shoulder and stabilizes it so it doesn’t come up while you stretch. So just kind of sitting on that arm there, take the other hand and then just gently pull your head towards the side. Again you want to keep that head in that kind of neutral position. You don’t want to turn your head you want to keep it upright and then just side bend over towards the other side. So for this you want to hold that stretch for 30 seconds, and then do that three times, but if you want to alternate back and forth, then you can give one side a break. Just make sure you do three on each side for 30 seconds, and I always like to do both sides even if you just have neck pain on your right side, doing both sides helps keep those muscles balanced. So the next stretch is for the levator scapulae. What that muscle does is it elevates or lifts the shoulder blades, that scapula, and when we’re stressed out we tend to kind of hunch up our shoulders and overwork that muscle, so it gets really tender and irritated and at the attachments up top on the neck and down low at that shoulder blade. There’s usually those really tender spots that you can push on, and we call those trigger points. So the way to stretch out that muscle is to take the hand on the side that you want to stretch and kind of put it on the back of the shoulder blade where your elbow is coming up a little bit. It doesn’t have to be super high, but by doing this that helps stabilize and push that scapula down to keep it in one spot while you’re stretching. You’re going to take the other hand and put it behind your head because when you pull forward it’s going to be at about a 45 degree angle away, so almost like you’re looking at your opposite knee. So it’s not straightforward down, it’s not straight to the side, it’s kind of in that angle. So you’re just going to come down this way, and you should feel it along that levator muscle right there. So just holding that stretch for about 30 seconds, switch sides, so then you come up stabilizing that shoulder blade and then pulling down towards that opposite knee for 30 seconds, and then doing three on each side. The next set of muscles are your scalene muscles, and those are the muscles in the front there. When those get tight, they can sometimes cause a little bit of nerve pain because the vessels run through those muscles and underneath those muscles, so when they get tight, they can put a lot of pressure on everything. So the way to stretch that is if you want to stretch your right side, you’re going to take your left hand and place it just above that collarbone kind of on those muscles. That’s going to kind of help stabilize that collarbone because they’re connected there at that clavicle, and so you want to keep it stabilized. You’re going to turn your head towards that side and then look up towards the ceiling while you’re putting a little pressure downwards on that collarbone. So again you’re going to hold that for 30 seconds, come back down, switch sides, opposite right over there turn your head, and look up getting that nice stretch through there, and doing that three times on each side. The last set of exercises are going to be to strengthen the muscles a little bit, but they’re going to be isometric exercises which is you’re not actually moving but you’re contracting the muscles. So the way to do that is we’re going to go back to those motions, but we’re going to put our hand on our head so we’re not moving our head anymore, but we’re pushing into that direction. So for a side bend, you want to put your hand on the side. This is the motion that you’re going to do, but you’re going to push into your hands and your head’s not actually moving. With this sometimes if your neck is painful, if you push really really hard, it hurts, so you want to feel tension, you want to feel pressure, but you don’t want it to be painful. So you might want to start off with just about a fifty percent push. So pushing into your head, and then relaxing. I’m moving my head a little bit just so you can see what I’m doing, but you really shouldn’t be moving anything. You’re pushing into your hand, getting that pressure. You might be able to see those muscles activating and then relaxing, so for just about five seconds push in, relax, and do three on each side. So if you want to alternate back and forth to give one side a break you can. So pushing in and then coming back, so about three to five seconds and then relax. So then the next one is going to be that rotation motion, so again you’re doing that movement, but you’re not going anywhere. So holding holding your head again, but now I’m doing that rotational movement. Pushing into my hand, so again about three to five seconds, switch sides, turning in that way three to five seconds, and then doing three on each side. And then the last one is going to be going forward. So again just pushing in your hand, but now it’s going to be on your forehead. So just kind of put the the bottom of the palm there so it’s comfortable, and then you’re pushing in like you’re doing that motion, so again pushing in three to five seconds, relaxing, pushing in three to five seconds, three times. Yeah we need a nap after that. Those were your stretches and exercises to help relieve neck pain. If you have any questions, leave them in the comments section, and I’d like to recognize our wall of thanks! Thanks Frank DG, and thanks Woody and Daisy! We appreciate your support. If you want to be on the patreon wall of thanks, click the box up here. And remember, be safe, have fun and I hope you feel better soon!

5 Pressure Points for Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo


oh hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo and Princess
Remy, and today I’m going to show you five pressure point relief spots. so
let’s get started. so pressure points don’t always work for everybody, but it’s a really good easy thing to try
and it does work sometimes. if you’ve got some stress, a lot of times these help
with headaches, so depending on if you’re stressed, if you’re anxious, or maybe
you’ve got some headaches, or just new kind of stress in your neck here, these are
really good to try cuz again, they’re quick, they’re easy. it might not work for
you, but I think it’s worth trying. a couple of them have really worked for me.
so each hold do you want to hold it for about five to ten seconds. and with
pressure points you want to put a good amount of pressure in there. sometimes
with some acupressure points and stuff you’re just placing your hand on this,
but this is actually a pressure point where you want to put some pressure on
there. so the first one is over your clavicle area. so you can either do this
on the clavicle bones, some people like that pressure point, or slightly below it.
I like to do it slightly below it because I feel like pressure points do
well on muscle areas, and so you’ve got a little bit of your muscles right down
below that clavicle right there or that collarbone. so you can try it on the bone,
but I like it better just underneath because there’s just a little kind of
groove that you can fit your fingers there. and so I’m pushing into that area.
I’m putting some pressure where it’s slightly uncomfortable. it’s not painful,
but I can definitely feel the pressure point there. so really again just pushing
five to ten seconds, maybe if you’re in a clinic having a therapist do it for you
they might do it a little bit longer, but just starting off you probably just want
to do that five to ten seconds. you can do it a couple times. you can switch and
then do it on the other side. so again there’s my clavicle or my collarbone
kind of in the middle of it this it sits here kind of coming in the middle that
little groove and just putting that pressure in through there. if you happen
to feel some numbness or tingling in your hands, if it’s strong you might just
be pushing on some nerves through there, so you might want to slightly adjust
because you don’t want to irritate the nerves. you really want this to be in the
muscle kind of area and again that five to ten
seconds. so the next one I’ve used this several times for headaches. so not
migraines, but just maybe like a tension headache or sometimes a dehydration
headache. you want to come down to where your thumb and your pointer finger meet
kind of in this little meaty area in between there’s a muscle here a big
thick muscle called your thenar muscle, and you’re kind of pushing in there and
in here. so you can see on each side almost like I’m pinching that area but
don’t just get the skin, if you come low you’re just gonna get the skin you want
to feel some muscle that you’re pushing on in there, and I can kind of feel it
tingle into my fingers. Not tingling like nerve pain, but where I’m hitting like a
pressure point and that’s what you want to feel. and so again I’m pushing pretty
hard for that five to ten seconds. and I’m going to show you when I let it up
you can kind of see where my fingernail mark is right there. so you know that I’m
pushing pretty hard and again you can do both sides. you can do it a couple times
like if you want to do two or three on each side,
but I’d maybe alternate back and forth. and again you can see that I’m pushing
pretty hard. you can see where it gets a little bit lighter right there because
I’m pushing into that area and then releasing it. so again, a lot of times
even though I’m pushing here, if you have a headache those pressure points kind of
work out throughout your body, so it can help a referred area kind of thing. you
can also do a little pressure point it’s called kind of your tendon triangle,
a little bit higher up at your thumb joint up top here. and for some people if
you can get it right, there’s a tendon coming here and a tendon coming here and
sometimes there’s a nice little groove or a pocket almost where those wrist
bones are. so you can use your thumb in between there or your finger, I kind of
like to use my thumb because I get a little bit more here, but again I’m
pushing right into that triangle around those tendons. so not necessarily on the
tendons, but in between in that pocket and again five to ten seconds holding it
switching sides getting that five to ten second hold and really just kind of
getting that pressure in there and getting everything to relax. and a lot of
times that’s just helps relieve that anxiety helps relieve your,
if you’re kind of stressed out because it almost kind of resets those muscles,
resets the whole meridian in your body. so then the next ones are for your
temple. so again this is another good one if maybe you have some tension headache,
or maybe at that dehydration headache you feel in the front. tension headaches
in the back or on the side, so just kind of finding your temples. you can do both
of these at the same time or if you just want to do one at a time you can, but
again with this one I like to use my fingers instead of pushing it with my
thumb’s just cuz it’s up on my temple area sometimes this is a little more
tender. but again I’m putting some pressure on there so I can feel that I’m
pushing. I’m not just placing my fingers there, I’m really kind of pushing in for
that five to ten seconds and really getting that push really getting that
feel, and you can do that a couple times if you want to. and then the last one is
another big one where you hold a lot of stress. you hold a lot of anxiety.
especially if you have a desk job, you work on the computer a lot, if you’re
typing. back here is your levator scapulae muscle, and this is the one that
brings our scapula or shoulder blades up. and if you come down to where that
muscle attaches to that shoulder blade or that scapula, a lot of times you can
feel a knot. you can feel that pressure point and so sometimes this one again if
you’re doing it to yourself, it’s a little easier using your fingers but
maybe if somebody else is willing to do it for you, sometimes using the thumb or
even using the tool so you don’t have to wear out your fingers. but I’m almost
just grabbing with my finger kind of going like this, you can see .and a lot of
times if you are stressed out or you’ve got a lot of you know tension in there,
you’re gonna find it pretty easy. you’re gonna oh that’s the spot and then just
push inwards with those fingers. so again maybe that five to ten seconds. if a
therapist was doing it for you, when I’m working on patient, I usually hold it for
about sixty to ninety seconds. so I’m holding it a lot longer to try and get
those muscles to release, but sometimes it’s a little harder to do on your own
and again if you’re doing this for the first time, you might not want to go
quite that long because you’re going to be sore afterwards. a lot of times when
you’re getting those pressure points or those trigger points in there, after you push on it it gets really sore. but then the next
day it actually feels better because it almost reset everything. oh oh yes.
so there’s your five stress relief pressure points. if you’d like to help
support my channel, make sure and click on the link up there, and don’t forget to
subscribe, where Remy? down there. and remember be safe, have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

Hip Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo

Hip Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo, and today
I’m going to show you a seated piriformis stretch. so let’s get started. each stretch is going to be 30 seconds,
and we’re gonna do three on each side. before we get started, if you haven’t
subscribed already, make sure you click on the link over there. so I’ve got a
timer set up 30 seconds, and then there’s gonna be a 10-second break in between
them. so that’s just to kind of help the muscles reset and then switch over to
the other side cuz I like to alternate back and forth. so I’m gonna go ahead and get started, and I’ll talk you through it as we go. so here we go. so with the
seated piriformis stretch, bring your foot up and just cross it over almost
into a figure four position. that’s what we call the stretch a figure four, and
then keep your back straight and just lean forward at your hips. and so you
should feel the stretch right in that booty area underneath the leg that
you’re crossing over. now don’t curl your back because if I come over like this,
I’m getting less of a stretch than if I keep my back straight. so make sure you
keep that back straight and lean forward. so take a little break. sometimes you
might feel some tingling going down the leg, but that might just be that nerve
getting pressed a little bit. so crossing over to the other side, keeping that back
straight, and just leaning forward. so a lot of times if you have some sciatica
issues, that sciatic nerve runs underneath that piriformis muscles, so if
you’re sitting for long periods at your desk at work or if you’re doing a
Netflix marathon or something like that, you might get what we call monkey butt,
or that nerve pain going down your leg, so these are some great stretches to
do if you’re sitting for a long period and maybe your legs start falling asleep
a little bit. I think we’ve all had it happen to us once or twice, and so this
is a really good way just to stretch out that muscle and get it going.
so crossing over again, going back to the other side keep that back nice and
straight, and lean forward. so the stretches that I’m doing here is also a
part of an office stretching series that I have. so there’s a whole bunch of
different stretches, I kind of go from head to toe, so make sure you watch all
the way to the end so you can check out that
link there that I have. so again feel it kind of in that booty area hopefully
each time feels a little bit better. you can lean a little bit further and get
that stretch even more, then come on back up. shake it out a little bit, and then
get ready to go back to the other side. so again that piriformis muscle can
sometimes cause a lot of problems, so going back into that stretch. people who
have that sciatic pain sometimes it can be coming from your back, but sometimes it really is that nerve just getting pinched at that piriformis being too
tight, so this is one that you should do if you don’t do any other stretches, if
you’re sitting for long periods, this is a great one to do and it’s pretty easy
because you can do this and still work if you want to. you don’t even have to
take a break. so I know sometimes it’s hard to take that break, but this is one
that you don’t even have to stop doing your work. you can really continue to do
whatever you’re doing while you’re at your desk, so that’s why I really like it.
it’s easy to do, and if you say you don’t have time for it, you don’t actually have
to take the time for it. you can keep on working. so leaning forward again
and then just leaning in. some people ask about the foot. should I flex it, should I
relax it, it doesn’t really matter. I personally like you to be completely
relaxed. some people might feel more of a stretch if they flex that foot, but when
I’m stretching I want my whole body to be relaxed. that’s how you’re gonna get a
really good stretch. so I like it to be just relaxed and if you want more, just
lean in a little bit more. so stretches should never hurt, they shouldn’t be pain,
it should be that good kind of hurt. hurt so kind of hurt. so good kind of feeling.
so if you’re leaning in, and you’re just really really hurting, you’re having lots
of tingling and numbness going down your leg, try not pushing so hard. try maybe
reset yourself, but if you keep getting a lot of hurt the whole time,
then hold off on that stretch and you should probably get a check with the
doctor or your physical therapist and see if there’s something going on
because the stretching should always just feel really really good. and it does.
it feels like a very good stretch. so that’s it 30 seconds 3 on each side.
if you would like to check out that office series which has a whole bunch of
different exercises, it’s great. doesn’t necessarily have to be for the office, it
can be for anything, check out that link up there. and if you’d like to support my
channel click on the link to find out how up here. and don’t forget to
subscribe by clicking down here. and remember be safe (keep that booty happy),
have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

Wrist Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo, and today
I’m going to show you some stretches for your wrist flexors and extensors. so
let’s get started. before we start, if you haven’t
subscribed already, make sure and click on the button over there. so for the
wrist flexors and extensors, we’re gonna do two stretches each way for 30 seconds. so we’ll go up and then down and then up and down again. so I’ve got a timer set,
so it’s going to be 30 seconds and then we’re gonna do a little ten-second break
in between. so let’s go ahead and get started with the stretches for the wrist
flexors and extensors. so you’re gonna put your hands out in front of you, and
we’ll start with the stretching the wrist extensors first. so just going
downwards, so with this if you just hold it this way, you get a lot of stretch. if
this is too much stretch, put your fingers out and it’s just a little bit
less of a stretch. if you want even more of a stretch you can push in on your
hand and curl it in, and that will give you even more of a stretch. so after that,
little 10-second break. these are great if you’re working at a desk especially
on a computer for long periods. if you’re doing a lot of stuff with your hands,
these are really great to do. so now we’re going into the wrist flexors. so
this time is kind of opposite, if you have your fists in a fist, it’s not quite
as much of a stretch, but if you open up your hands you get even more of a
stretch and you feel it under there, so again if you want more stretch than that
you can just do a little pull, gentle pull, on each side, or you can put your
hand up on a wall. so any kind of work with your hands a lot these muscles get
really tired, so it’s great for these if you’re an artist or a guitar player that
works really well as well. and if you want a little bit more, you can stretch
three on each side, but this is just to kind of give you an idea. so again
curling down with your fingers to get a lot of stretch, opening them up if you
just want a little bit of a stretch and if you want a little bit of overpressure
you can push it into a wall or you can just kind of alternate
back and forth giving a little pressure with your other hand that way. but again
this is probably enough if they’re sore and tired. getting that good stretch in
there and then take a little break. sometimes you want to shake them out a
little bit because it feels like a big stretch in there, and then we’re gonna do
one more going upwards. so hands out, up almost into a stop sign position. so
getting that nice stretch and so when you’re up stretching out the wrist
flexors underneath and then when you’re down you’re stretching those wrist
extensors up on top. so stop sign getting that nice stretch in there. remember if
you don’t want quite as much, make a fist then more then over pressure. so there
you have it. those were your stretches for your wrist flexors and extensors.
this is actually a part of an office series where I give you a bunch of
different stretches from head to toe, and if you’re sitting in an office or even
if you’re working at home or doing something where you’re sitting for a
long period, these are easy stretches. you don’t need
equipment to do it so if you want to see some more, make sure and click up here,
and if you’d like to help support my channel find out how by clicking up here,
and don’t forget to subscribe by clicking down here. remember be safe
(loosen them up), have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

10 Best Lower Back Stretches for Low Back Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo

10 Best Lower Back Stretches for Low Back Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo


oh hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo and Remy,
and today I’m gonna show you the top ten low back stretches. so let’s get started. A lot of you asked me how many should I do. generally with stretches you want to hold them for 30 seconds and do three on each side.
number one, pelvic tilt. so you might hear me say pelvic tilt for a lot of
different things, but it really is a great stretch. this one is really going
to loosen up those back muscles and it’s one of my favorites to do. for a supine
pelvic tilt, lie down on the ground with your legs propped up, feet flat on the
ground. and imagine that you’re trying to squish your hand if it was underneath
you. so push down rotate the hips and come back up. number two, the cat dog stretch. again
with the cat and the dog, my favorite because it’s animals it’s really really
great stretch for your low back. you can feel it stretching forwards and
backwards with those two motions and it really loosens up that low back. for the
cat dog stretch, get on all fours. you’re gonna arch your back like a cat and tuck
your chin in and then drop your back down and pick your head up. number three, trunk rotation in supine
or lying on your back. so this one’s really good just to start getting some
rotational movements and your back and your back is supported on the floor so
it’s a nice stretch. for a trunk rotation stretch, bend both knees up and keep your feet flat on the ground. then just rotate your knees to one side trying to keep
the upper part of your body flat and hold that stretch. number four, trunk rotation with a leg
crossover. if just the regular rotation isn’t quite enough stretch for you, if
you bring your leg up and over it’s going to give you an even bigger stretch
and sometimes you’ll feel a little pop in your low back because it’s
readjusting your spine. for a lower back stretch lying down, place one leg
straight out and pull the other one up to about a 90 degree angle and then pull
it across your body. number five, hamstring stretch with a
strap. using a strap or a rope or a dog leash to stretch out your hamstrings is
a great way to get that stretch and just keep those muscles nice and relaxed. for
hamstring stretch in supine with a strap, you can use a belt or a dog leash. take
the belt and put it at the ball of your foot, straighten out your leg as much as
you can. you want that knee to be straight, so if it bends then bring it
back down a little bit. pull your toes towards you and bring it up till you
feel a stretch and hold it. number six, hip flexor stretch off of a
bed. this is a great way to stretch out your hip flexors. if you have knee
problems and you can’t do it really well in a lunge stretch, if you just take your
leg and drop it off the edge of the bed, without falling off, it really stretches
out those hip flexor muscles. for hip flexor stretch off the bed, lie down on
your back on a bed and get close to the edge, but try not to fall off the bed.
bring one leg down off the edge, letting it hang, lie back a little bit and then bring the other knee up towards your chest and
hold that stretch. number seven, a prone press up. so if
you’re on your stomach and you’re pressing up, you get a nice stretch in
your low back in and your abdominals. this is sometimes contraindicated for
certain back conditions, so make sure this is something this is general pain
or maybe a disc issue, and if you’re not quite sure what it is, you might want to
hold off on this one. for a prone press up, lie on your stomach and then put your
hands flat on the ground, and press your upper body up. try and keep your hips
down. so you’re not coming up with the hips, but the hips are down and you’re bending just at your back and then hold it. number eight, a knee a chest stretch. it
does a great job of stretching out that low back, but make sure if you have some
knee problems, don’t put too much pressure on your knees when you’re
stretching. for a single knee to chest, bend both knees up. then take your
hands and grab underneath your thigh and pull towards your chest holding that
stretch. number nine, double knee to chest stretch. so after you do just the single knee, if you bring them both up together, it’s a
really good overall stretch on your low back as well as your upper back too. for a
double knee to chest stretch, prop both knees up. then grab underneath both thighs and pull your knees towards your chest
holding that stretch. number ten, a prayer stretch or Child’s
Pose whichever one you want to call it. this is just a great whole body stretch.
you can get your arms, you can get your upper back, your lower back, your hips, and your knees, so it’s a good one to finish with. for the prayer stretch, start off
sitting on your feet and then you’re going to push your arms straight out in
front of you on the ground, holding the stretch. so there you have it, those were your top
ten low back stretches. if you’d like to help support my channel, make sure and
click on the link up there, and don’t forget to subscribe by clicking down
there. and remember, be safe, yeah have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

Plantar Fasciitis Pain Relief Treatments – Ask Doctor Jo

Plantar Fasciitis Pain Relief Treatments – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo, and today
I’m going to show you five treatments for plantar fasciitis. so let’s get
started. If you haven’t already, make sure and click the subscribe button right down there. so you
like my fancy compression socks? I’m going to talk about those a little bit
later. so with plantar fasciitis, a lot of times you have that pain right there on
that plantar fascia, but sometimes you can have it just out your heel, in the
back, way up top. so it doesn’t always have to be at your arch. plantar
fasciitis can be caused by a lot of different things, it can even be caused
by your knees and your hips, so it’s really important to kind of find out
what’s going on especially if you’re treating the plantar fasciitis and it’s
not getting better. so the first thing that I like to do is
really get the joints moving in the foot. we have so many bones and joints in our
foot, all along here and all along here, so to get those joints moving you can
just really simply start off like kind of curling your toes down this way.
Fanning them up this way. rolling them to the side back and forth, and what’s
that’s doing with those joints is just kind of mobilizing them. bending in like
this if those joints are tight or maybe have
some adhesions or scar tissue in there, that’s gonna increase that plantar
fasciitis because your foot’s not gonna be moving how it’s supposed to. so you can
just spend 1 or 2 minutes on this. you don’t have to do a lot, you can again
kind of fan out those toes push down on them curl them in push that way. you know
fan forward, fan back, just really get all of those joints around the foot even the
heel in the back. kind of would go back and forth just to get those moving. And a
lot of times, that will just help loosen it up and that will feel really good as
well. so the next one is just using a ball to kind of roll stuff out. so this
is a lacrosse ball. you can use a tennis ball. you can use a racquet
ball. you can really use anything. you can use a foam roller if you want to. I like
using a lacrosse ball because it’s a little bit
firmer and it gives you a little more pressure, but if you have plantar
fasciitis and it’s really tender and painful, you might just want to start off
with something like a racquetball or a tennis ball that’s a little more squishy.
so to start off with, I like to stretch the big toe or we call it the first Ray
because if you have a lot of stiffness in that big toe, and you don’t get that
toe extension when you’re walking you don’t get that normal gait pattern, so
this is tight that can cause plantar fasciitis as well. so sometimes I think
we forget that first ray or that big toe, but it’s really important to stretch and
I like the ball because you can just focus on that big toe there. I’m going to
turn it this way just so you can see it where my the rest of my toes kind of go
down but that big toe stays on the ball just to stretch it out. so I really like
that you can use it like a traditional stretch hold it for 30 seconds, take a
break, do that three times. or you can do some shorter ones if it’s really tight
and painful and do like a 15 to 20 second, and do maybe five of them. so then
still with the ball after you get that that big toe, then start rolling it down
into the ball of your foot. and that’s where those tarsal muscles are around in
here metatarsals and all that kind of stuff, and so you really want to get each
and every part. so all of that ball of the foot down into the arch on the
inside on the outside, but make sure you go all the way down to the heel because
that’s where that plantar fascia attaches, and a lot of times people have
that heel pain. so I always say even just kind of go past it a little bit but
really get that whole area. you can go up and down a couple times or you can just
spend, you know, all your time in one spot, move down, all your time in the next spot.
going maybe again one to two minutes, three if you want a little bit more. I’m
doing it standing, that’s going to give me a little more pressure to push
through the ball, so I feel really good stretch with this. again if you’re tender
and in that plantar fascia, bottom of the foot, you might want to start doing it sitting
down in a chair, so you don’t have to put as much
pressure on it. but still even standing, I can do a little bit of pressure versus a
lot of pressure. so it’s really up to you. you want it to be that hurt so good
feeling. you don’t want it to just be painful the whole time. so make sure
you’re getting that whole bottom of the foot there.
so the third treatment is using some sort of compression socks, and the folks
at Eversport sent me their compression socks for plantar fasciitis,
and these are really cool. they have a lot of great components too. And you can
see that it is open at the toes. that gives you a couple different benefits.
one of it is just to kind of keep the flow and your toes, so it’s not so close
up because you could put socks over this. so then it prevents you know any kind of
fungal infections and things like that. it’s got some nice compression here and
here so it doesn’t slide which I like that as well. you can see here at the
heel there’s some reinforcement, and then there’s also some extra support at that
arch. so a lot of times with plantar fasciitis, that arch starts to fall a
little bit and this just kind of helps support it so it doesn’t have so much
pressure on it. and so these are really great I like them because they’re pretty
versatile, like I said, again since they’re not these big huge things, you
can put your regular socks over them which is really nice if you want to, or
you can just wear them as is. so that’s nice as well.
again super comfortable, and you can see that extra support there and that extra
support there as well. so if you’re interested in purchasing the socks, make
sure and click up here. so the fourth treatment is really getting almost like
a pre gait movement. a lot of times with plantar fasciitis, what happens even if
it’s something coming at our hips or knees, we end up not getting a normal
gait pattern or a normal walking pattern. and a lot of times I have with my
patients and folks really doing an exaggerated step. so hitting your heel
first and really coming through on your toes like this. so you can do that in
slow motion, and you can really just stay in one spot. so you don’t necessarily
have to do the heel strike to start off with. I like to do the full going through
like that, but you can really just kind of start in this position and just roll
up onto your toes. so again it’s really kind of working
that first ray, that big toe, as well. you want to keep your foot forward. if you’re
going out and getting pressured in different spots on the outside, then
you’re not really getting that full stretch. so a lot of times that what’s
what happens is people end up rolling out on the outside of their foot, and
they’re not getting that good proper follow-through. so just standing like
this and doing, you can even use your arm a little bit to give you an extra push forward, but really getting that exaggerated, I’m curling my toes I’m going up on my
toes movement. and again then if you want to add in, you know kind of a heel. start
here and push through. you can and do that you know five to ten times. if that
feels pretty good then you can kind of bump up from there until you get to
about fifteen or twenty and then you can actually do the distance walking and
really just exaggerate that heel to toe strike just to loosen everything up. and
so the last one is going to actually be a plantar fascia massage. so I’m gonna
sit down and show you how to do that. to stretch out the plantar fascia, you
really want to get the whole bottom of the foot just like when you were rolling
with the ball. you can stretch it out a couple different ways, but what I like to
do is really just use my thumb’s to get down in there. you can use a lotion or a
cream if you want to so there’s not as much friction, but you don’t have to use
the lotion or cream if you don’t want to. what I usually like to do is start off
just by taking my thumbs and pushing right down the middle of that fascia and
just get all the way to the end past the ball of the foot. and then go out like
that. so just doing that a couple times. if you have some inflammation, you might
feel those adhesions or scar tissue in there, and where you feel that a little
more it will probably be more sensitive, and that just means you really need to
work on that spot a little bit more. so after you do this for about 30 seconds
maybe a minute, then you’re going to start fanning outwards. so then I like to
take the thumbs and then just go outwards, just kind of fanning out and
then once I get close closer to where the those joints are in the foot, I like
then pull a little bit too. so I’m just kind of spreading out everything and
then stretching out those joints a little bit as well.
so just moving through, going through the top just getting that stretch starting
all the way down at the heel, fan out there, keep on going and so you really
want to do this for about three to five minutes. but a lot of times it’s pretty
uncomfortable, but that’s really going to get a good stretch. while you’re here. you
can even you know stretch out the toes if you want to. you can take each joint
and just kind of do some joint mobilizations at the end as well, but
taking each one and going up and down just to get a lot of movement in there
and flexibility in there as well. so you can do that while you’re massaging. I
like to do that as well again just kind of taking each joint of the toes and
then getting that movement from side to side. so that does a really nice job too
and usually gets it feeling a lot better. so one more time fanning out and then
just going straight down that way. so if you’re interested in purchasing the Eversport compression socks, make sure you click on the link up here. and don’t
forget to subscribe by clicking on the link down here. and remember be safe (keep your plantar fascial feeling good), have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

Wrist Tendonitis Treatment for Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo

Wrist Tendonitis Treatment for Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody its Doctor Jo and cool cat
Bear, and we’re going to show you some stretches and exercises for wrist
tendonitis. So wrist tendonitis is a general term, so we’re just going to do
some general stretches and exercises. So let’s get started. To start off with some wrist range of
motion type stretches exercises, start off with your elbow bent. Now you can put
it on the table, you can rest it on something, you can just hold it up in the
air, or you can just place it in your other hand. So it just really depends on
your comfort level, and you can also just prop it up on your leg as well, but what
you’re going to do is just at your wrist, is make a fist with your hand and go down
as far as you comfortably can, and then come up as far as you comfortable
can. So again you don’t have to put it on anything you can just do it in the air,
but you’re going to go down and that’s going to kind of stretch up here, and
then come up and that’s going to stretch down there. So with this one it’s really
just getting that motion, it’s not necessarily a stretch yet, so you can
just kind of go back and forth continuously, but make sure it’s a nice
smooth motion. If you want to pause for a second or two at each side you can. So
after you go up and down or a flexion extension, then you’re going to go side
to side this way. So this is ulnar deviation, radial deviation. So now just
going side to side. So you’re going to stretch it out this way. When you go here
that ulnar side and then this way here that radial side. So you can feel it all
the way sometimes down into your thumb. So I’ll do a different angle. So you’re
just going this way and then this way, but a lot of times it’s easy to prop it
up on something and go back and forth. So with these you can just do about ten
maybe five each way, this is really just to get everything loosened up before you
start stretching and exercising it. Then the next motions are going to be
supination and pronation. With supination and pronation, I like having the elbow
bent at your side, when people keep their arms straight and do supination and
pronation, they’re really been doing it shoulder verses at their wrists and
their forearms. Bend your elbow, kind of keep it close to your side so you’re
getting the movement here versus through the whole arm. You can open up your hand
now and so going downwards this is pronation, and then coming up is
supination like you’re holding a bowl of soup, that’s how I always remember it, and
so again just this is for motion so you’re just moving it back and forth,
another nice kind of smooth motion. If you want to do a little pause each way you
can, but that’s just really kind of to get everything loosened up and get it
moving a little bit. So then you’re going to go into a stretch, actually stretching
out those wrist flexors and extensors. So the best way to do that is put your arm
straight out. If you come down, you’re going to stretch the top here. If you
keep your fingers open, that’s not quite as much of a stretch, but if you make a
fist you’ll get even more of a stretch, and if you take your other hand and push
it down even more you’ll feel a really really big stretch. Now this one is for
stretch, so you’re going to hold it for 30 seconds, so you want it to be tension,
slightly uncomfortable, but you don’t want it to be painful, and some people
might feel it more here, but again with tendonitis if it’s wrist tendonitis all
these muscles and tendons go all the way up to the elbows, so even though it’s
wrist these are all connected here. So you want to stretch everything out
through here. Then after you do that for 30 seconds, then you’re going to go the
other way. So it’s different when you go up and stretch these muscles under here,
if you have your fists like this, then you’re just getting a little
stretch, and if you want even more of a stretch you open up your hands, and if
you want even more of a stretch than that, take your other hand and just pull
those fingers back towards you and you’ll feel a nice stretch through here.
So again holding that for 30 seconds and then you’re going to do it three times
each way. I like to alternate back and forth just to give them a little break
in between. if this is uncomfortable kind of bringing your hand over you can
always place it on a wall, or you can even just, if you’re on the floor,
place your hands on the floor and then lean forward. So see I’m getting that
stretch through there going this way, so just placing your hands flat going in
the other direction, or then putting the back of your hands
down and then leaning back you’ll get a stretch that way as well. So then you can
do both if you want to so you can stretch it that way, or you can just use
your hands to stretch it, so either way whichever one you’d like. So then the
next one is just opening up your hand as big as you can, kind of getting
everything stretched and opened up, and then just close everything into a fist,
and you might hear some of my fingers popping a little bit, that’s okay that’s
pretty normal, but again you’re just opening and closing this. So the
tendons in the wrists in the hands are just kind of moving and gliding, and if I
turn this way you should be able to see them as I open up, you see them this way
and then when I close them I stretch a little bit. So just again this is just
kind of a back and forth you don’t necessarily have to hold the stretch if
you’re really just trying to get everything moving and opening it up a
little bit, so this is a nice one to do. Then you’re going to go into some
strengthening stuff once you get this the wrist loosened up and get it
stretched out. So you can do this a couple different ways, one is a ball
squeeze. So you can take any kind of ball you want, this is a racquet ball. You can
go lacrosse ball, a tennis ball, some people like the firmer balls like a
lacrosse ball, and some people like a little more squishy like the racquet
ball or a tennis ball, but just place it in your hand and all you’re going to do
is just squeeze. And with this one you’re going to hold for about three to five
seconds, so nice big squeeze, hold it, you don’t have to squish the ball completely,
but just so you’re getting that squeeze in there all the way around, squeeze and
hold, and you should be able to feel all those muscles through the wrist and the
forearm activating. So just probably three to five seconds doing that five
times. If you don’t happen to have a ball handy, you can roll up a towel and do a
towel squeeze, so same kind of concept, just get your fingers all way around and squeeze as tight as you comfortably can and relax. Some
people find that the towel is too squishy, and that’s okay, if it’s too
squishy another easy and cheap alternative is a piece of a pool noodle.
If you’ve seen some of my videos, you know that the pool noodles can be used
in a whole bunch of different ways, but this is great because it’s a little
squishier than some of the balls but it’s firmer than the towel, so you’re
getting that kind of in-between, so again just spread your fingers out a
little bit, squeeze hold it for about three to five seconds, and then relax. So
doing that five to ten times really just getting some strengthening in that area
and then closing. Then you can go to having just a rubber band, nothing fancy
about it it’s just a simple rubber band. Put it around all your fingers like that
and your thumb, and then you’re just going to open it up as wide as you
comfortably can. Now if I go too much wider, the band’s going to roll down my
fingers, so I don’t open it all the way up, but the key is to slowly come back in
so you really want to make sure that you’re not just popping it back in, but
you’re controlling that movement to get that strengthening and those fingers and
that wrist area, so nice slow controlled and going out and in. So since these are
smaller muscles, even though it’s just a rubber band, you don’t really want to do
a whole lot of them, you just want to do about five or ten really just to get
those little smaller muscles working. So that does a great job as well, and then
to do some more strengthening getting a little bit heavier with objects each
time, you can just use either a soup vegetable can. If you happen to have a
one-pound band, you can use a one-pound can, a one-pound weight, you can use that
as well because this is about one pound. So again you can prop it up on something,
people tend to like to do this especially if they’re really sore in
that wrist, but just make sure that your wrist is
hanging off the edge so you have that free movement to do that extension. If
you feel pretty good, you can just hold it up in the air and do it this way as
well, but again you want to do a nice smooth controlled motion going straight
up and down, but if you feel like you’re getting a lot of movement then just prop
it up on something, come all the way down that full motion all the way down and
that full motion all the way up. So again just starting off with ten of
these, if that’s easy the 2 sets of 10, three sets of ten, two sets of fifteen, but if
you get to doing 20 – 25 and it’s pretty easy, then you can go up a little heavier
on the weight. Then you’re going to turn your hand over and do the same motion,
but now you’re getting those flexors, so just nice and slow coming down and then
nice and slow coming up, so it doesn’t have to be a huge motion, but really try
and get that full motion of your wrists because if you’ve got some tendonitis in
it you might only be able to do that, which is fine, but eventually hopefully
you’ll get to go a little bit further because it’s okay if it’s uncomfortable,
but you really don’t want it to be painful. So that nice big movement in
there and then for the radial deviation you can turn it this way and then drop
it down and come up. I like if I have a weight where I can hold it a little bit
tighter I like having my thumb up on top when I do it, it’s a little harder to do
it with a soup can because it’s bigger, but just make sure that you feel that
you’re in a comfortable position, and so sometimes if my thumbs more on top going
like this, it’s a little more comfortable because this gets a big stretch over
that thumb area, but if not that’s okay, but I do prefer when I have
weights to have that thumb up on top. So just coming all the way down and coming
all the way up, and then the last one is for the pronation supination with a
little bit of weight. So you can use a hammer if you want to. A Hammer’s nice
because it has a big weighted top so when you bring it back and forth, it gives that a little bit of extra pressure, but if you don’t have
a hammer handy which you might not, you can take the weight or the soup can and
hold it where most of it is up on top, and then keeping that elbow by your side
or just kind of over the table or over your leg, and then just roll over going
into that supination, and then coming all the way back into that pronation, so when
you have more of the weight up on top when it comes over, it’s just going to
give you that extra stretch and that extra resistance where you have to bring
it up and then come back the other way. So if you even want to do it right here
you can do it that way as well so that works pretty good, but if you want a nice
solid handle you can use a hammer to go back and forth with that as well.
so remember that with any kind of wrist exercises these are smaller muscles, so
you don’t have to go overboard if you’re not feeling anything while you’re doing
it, it doesn’t necessarily mean you’re not going to be sore or painful later, so
start off with just a little bit, and if you feel good the next day then you can
start progressing up from there. So those are your stretches and exercises for
wrist tendonitis. Don’t forget to support our channel by clicking up here,
and don’t forget to subscribe by clicking down here. And remember be safe,
have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

10 Best Neck Pain Relief Stretches – Ask Doctor Jo

10 Best Neck Pain Relief Stretches – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody its Doctor Jo and Kali and
Bear, and today we’re gonna show you the top ten neck stretches. So let’s get
started. So these 10 best neck stretches are in
my opinion the best. They’re not any kind of scientific research behind it, it’s
just my favorites the ones that I’ve found work best for me as well as my
patients, so let’s start out with a cervical rotation. So with cervical
rotation exercises, what we’re doing is we’re just stretching out the muscles
all around the neck here, so make sure that you keep your head in a neutral
position to do these rotational stretches, so let’s take a look. For
cervical rotation range of motion, you’re just going to turn your head to the side
almost like you’re looking over your shoulder and then back the other way. Number two is going to be a cervical
Sidebend or a neck sidebend, so those are just working the muscles on the side
to get those stretch out, so let’s take a look at that one. For a cervical side
bending range of motion, you’re going to bring your ear towards your shoulder, but
don’t bring your shoulder up to your ear. Number three is cervical extension where
you’re bringing your head back, and that’s gonna stretch those front muscles,
so let’s take a look at that. For a cervical extension range of motion,
you’re just going to be looking up towards the ceiling and then coming back
down. And number four is cervical flexion or
neck flexion, so then you’re going to be stretching those muscles in the back as
you bend forward, so let’s check that one. For a cervical flexion range of
motion, you’re just going to bring your chin towards your chest and then come
back up. Number five is a chin tuck. Chin tuck is
kind of a mix between a stretch and an exercise and is one of my favorite stretches
because it’s super easy to do and it really helps reset your neck if you’re
getting into bad posture, so you can do it several times a day. And when you work at a
computer a lot or when you’re focusing on something and you tend to get that
forward neck posture, doing some simple chin tucks are really effective to kind
of help reset those muscles. So let’s take a look at that one. For chin tucks
in sitting, you’re going to actually move your chin back, it’s not tucking it
forward, so place your finger on your chin and leave your finger in one spot,
and then tuck it in and hold it. Number six a chest stretch. The reason
it’s important to stretch out these chest muscles even though you don’t
always associate them with your neck, is they really are.
If these chest muscles are tight, it tends to pull us forward and then again
our head comes forward, and we get really really tight muscles, so when you stretch
out those chest muscles it helps open you up and get you back into better
posture, so let’s check out that one. For a corner chest stretch, place a hand on
each side of the corner, and one foot in the corner ,then push in and hold the
stretch. Number seven is an anterior scalene stretch.
The scalene muscles, especially the anterior ones, come through here right in
through here, and so when those are tight, it can put a lot of pressure here and
pull our head down and forward and that can cause a lot of pain, so let’s check
out that stretch. For a scaling stretch, place your hand above your collarbone on
the muscle, turn your head towards the side you want to stretch, and then look
up. Number eight upper trap stretch. The
upper traps are big-time ones that cause pain in our neck. They’re the ones up
here that go right all the way up into our neck here and then down into the
shoulder, sometimes they have trigger points, those muscles get really tight
often when we’re focused on something for a long time when we have a lot of
stress, so it’s really important to stretch those out, so let’s take a look.
For an upper trap stretch, take the arm of the side that you want to stretch and
either push it downwards or sit on it to hold that shoulder down, then take the
other hand on the side, and just pull it over towards your shoulder, holding that
stretch. Number nine a levator scapulae stretch.
The levator SCAP is again another one of those muscles. I sits right here, it
elevates or lifts our shoulder blades that scapula, and the reason that’s so
important with our neck is because it holds our stress the most. When we’re
stressed out, we get like this and it can cause a lot of tension and pain,
sometimes it gives people headaches because it gives you a lot of pain here
at the base of the skull down into the neck, and sometimes even out into the
shoulders, so that one’s really important to stretch, so let’s take a look. For a
levator scapulae stretch, the side that you want to stretch, you’re going to take
your arm and put it up over your shoulder and that’s to stabilize that
scapula, then you’re going to take your head down towards an angle almost like
you’re looking towards the opposite knee, take your other hand and put it behind
your head and give it a little extra stretch. Number ten is going to be a cervical
rotation or a neck rotation with a towel. Sometimes they’re called snags and the
reason the towel is so important is because it helps kind of stabilize the
spine, so if we want to rotate our neck but only rotate it at certain vertebrae,
you can use the towel to kind of stabilize one and then move the rest, so
it’s a really good way to kind of get some movement in the spine to help open up
those joints there. If the facets are kind of stuck, this is a great way to
loosen that up and stretch everything else, so let’s take a look at that. For a
neck rotation stretch with the towel, take the towel and put it behind your
neck, grab one side to anchor it down and keep it there, then take the opposite
hand put the towel up over your chin across your ear and you’re going to pull
upwards in a way when you rotate your neck to the side. So there you have it, those are your 10
best neck stretches. If you have any questions, leave in the comment section.
If you’d like to help support my channel, make sure you click up here, and don’t
forget to subscribe by clicking down here. And remember, be safe (keep those
muscles nice and stretched out), have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.