Types of Burns – First Aid, Treatment & Burn Repair Surgery


My name is Ioannis Goutos, I’m a
consultant plastic surgeon and both my NHS and private practice is based in London. My areas of expertise include burn care, scar management as well as
body contouring if you would like to arrange a consultation please feel free
to get in touch. The most popular classification for burn
is the one that relates to the degree of damage to the dermis which is the second layer of the skin. A superficial partial thickness burn is typically blistered,
weepy and painful and most of those burns tend to heal within two weeks with
dressings. A deep partial thickness burn has a drier appearance is less weepy and
less painful given that more blood vessels and nerves have been destroyed
during the burn injury. A proportion of deep partial thickness burns will need
an operation in order to ensure prompt healing. Full thickness burns are the
most severe degrees that we find in clinical practice where the entirety of
the skin has been burned. They tend to have a dry, waxy, leathery appearance and
the overwhelming majority of them need to be treated with an operation apart from the very small ones. The administration of appropriate first
aid following a burn is of paramount importance in order to prevent further
damage within the wound and improve its healing potential. Most specialists would
recommend the following steps. A) Stop the burning process. B) Remove any loose
clothing and jewelry from the affected area. C) Cool the burn down by using
running water for 20 minutes whilst maintaining the rest of the body warm. D) Cover the wound with cling film or a clean cloth and E) Seek appropriate
medical attention. The healing time for burn injuries
depends on a number of factors including the extent, the depth, the location as
well as the underlying mechanism of injury If we look at superficial partial
thickness burns these tend to heal within two weeks and most of any in an
uneventful manner. If we look up deep partial thickness and full thickness
burns they will take longer than two weeks to heal and very frequently we
intervene with a skin graft procedure in order to ensure optimal healing. What we know from the latest research is that when it comes to burns healing every day
counts. In other words the quicker the burn heals the lower the risk for
unfavorable scarring this makes prompt assessment and management by a
specialist burns consultant imperative in order to achieve the best possible
outcome. Burns can be very traumatic experiences
leaving behind significant scarring. Surgery may be indicated in order to
optimize wound healing and contribute to a better scar quality. Burn repair
surgery can be divided into acute which is performed immediately after the burn
injury or reconstructive which aims to resurface existing scars. There are a variety of options that are
available when it comes to burn surgery. When we look at acute burn surgery one
of the commonest operation is a skin graft. This involves the transfer of healthy layers of the skin onto the clean burn
wound in order to speed up healing. Occasionally we use flops these are
units of tissue that are transferred from one place to the other
in order to cover defects. We’re also privileged to be able to use what we
call dermal templates in burn surgery these are collagen based sheets of
animal origin that can be placed onto the wound before a skin graft achieves
wound healing. There is also emerging technology involving spray skin cells
that are aimed to regenerate the epidermis which is the top layer of the
skin.

First Aid for Fireworks injuries and staying safe around fireworks

First Aid for Fireworks injuries and staying safe around fireworks


– Hello, I’m Emma Hammett
from First Aid for Life and onlinefirstaid.com. It’s fireworks time. When autumn hits, we start
getting into Halloween, fireworks, Bonfire Night, Diwali, building up to New Year’s Eve. Fireworks start landing in the shops, and there is an increase
in antisocial behaviour associated with them, but more importantly, there
is also a serious increase in the number of injuries and
people admitted to hospital or turning up in A&E needing treatment for firework related injuries. In fact, there were
four and a half thousand people needing treatment last year. And that includes nearly
five hundred children that required treatment following
injuries with sparklers. Now a lot of people think that
sparklers are safe fireworks. Sparklers get as hot as a blowtorch, and we give them to small kids, and we say here, wave them around. So they need to be supervised seriously. They can have fun with
them, but be sensible. We’ve written a blog that
clearly takes you through some sensible precautions to minimise the risk from injuries with fireworks. And also, it gives you first
aid tips if somebody’s burned, if they end up with sparks in their eye, if they have smoke inhalation, or any of the other
relatively common injuries that happen around this year. So important things, if you’re
having a display at home, make sure that you’ve got a first aid kit and you know how to use it. You’ve got sand and you’ve got saline, which you can use to irrigate if somebody’s got something in their eye. Make sure you’ve also got
access to copious amounts of cool running water in
case somebody’s burned. There are all sorts of tips
that we have heard about and rules about fireworks
and the fireworks code. Please don’t store
fireworks in your pocket. Please don’t set them
off with a naked flame. Use a taper, and that obviously is a naked flame, but with a longer taper
rather than a lighter, which is obviously very short. Think very carefully. You’re setting off explosives. So stand well back, make sure the person posting the display and
setting off the fireworks is not consuming alcohol, because they need to have
their wits about them. Make sure that the fireworks have got the British Safety Standard, and that they are big enough, or rather, your garden is big enough, to house the fireworks that you’re buying, and they haven’t got too many
overhanging trees and things that could pose a risk. Ensure that people watching the fireworks are well back. Ideally, if they’ve got windows like this, they would be inside and the fireworks would be let off outside
so that they can see them from a safe distance
and from behind glass, where they’re safe. With sparklers, don’t
give them to under fives. And make sure that
children are wearing gloves when they’re holding sparklers. Have some sand for them to
put the spent sparklers out in because hot sparklers will
remain hot for a long time. If they pick them up,
they will burn themselves, and it will be a serious burn. With any burns, run the area
under cool running water for a full twenty minutes. Now we’ve got another blog
all about how to reduce the affects of a burn, to minimise the amount of
scarring and tissue damage and actually speed up the recovery, so the best treatment for a burn. If there’s sparks in the eyes and things, irrigate ideally with your sterile saline or with running water. If there’s anything embedded in the eye, you need to get them to an eye hospital as quickly as possible. Have a read of our blogs. I’m going to link them below. This Facebook Live. Stay safe at those firework display, and please don’t be one
of those statistics. So, fireworks are fun, I love them, but be safe and sensible, and also don’t forget the
impact they have on our pets. Pets are petrified. They have no idea what time of year it is and what to expect. That’s Emma Hammett
from First Aid for Life, and onlinefirstaid.com.

Child Care & First Aid : Getting a Newborn to Sleep Through the Night

Child Care & First Aid : Getting a Newborn to Sleep Through the Night


You’re exhausted, you have a new baby, and
you’re anxious to sleep through the night. My name is Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health
and Wellness Consultant, and I’m here to talk to you a little bit about babies and sleep.
The first thing you ought to know is that babies sleep a lot. You probably do know that
already you, just wish that they would sleep all night long. The thing about babies nervous
systems is that they tend to wake up every two, three, or four hours. Often they wake
up to be fed. A baby needs to get to be a certain age and a certain body weight in order
for them to be able to not need nutrition during the night. Sometimes that magic weight
might be somewhere around 12 pounds for example. By the time your child is about 3 to 6 months
old they ought to be sleeping 5 to 9 hours a night. In the mean time you can take some
steps to set it up so that your baby is likely to sleep for longer periods of time. Here’s
some things to do. One is during the day time; make sure that when the baby’s awake that
you provide some stimulation for them. That you talk to them a little bit, that you kind
of keep them a little more awake rather than just letting them sleep as much as they like.
The baby’s been sleeping for 2 or 3 hours during the day. You might kind of go in and
jostle a little bit and see if they aren’t perhaps ready to wake up. The second thing
to pay attention to is the night time routine. You want to signal to your baby that it’s
time to go to bed. What you do when they’re an infant carries over as they get to be several
months old; and you’ll be happy that you did this. You’re going to perhaps give them a
bath. You’re going to put them in some night time clothes. You’re going to give them a
bottle in a calm environment; maybe in their room while you’re rocking them or you’re breastfeeding.
Then you’re going to put them in bed. It’s best to put your baby to bed while they’re
still a little bit awake, you want your baby to get use to putting themselves to sleep.
Once they’re in their crib, then you say goodnight, and you leave the room. If they cry a little
bit don’t rush right back, you’re reinforcing that behavior. If they are crying a lot you’re
going to have to go back in and console them, pat them on the back, talk to them, maybe
start the mobile back up, and then quietly leave; stay calm. So what we are wanting to
do is to establish a good night time routine and also keep them awake a little bit more
during the daytime. Those are two strategies that you can try. Check with your pediatrician
they have a wealth of information at your next well child checkup. Again my name is
Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health and Wellness Consultant and good luck getting a good night
sleep.

Child Care & First Aid : Getting a Newborn to Sleep Through the Night


You’re exhausted, you have a new baby, and
you’re anxious to sleep through the night. My name is Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health
and Wellness Consultant, and I’m here to talk to you a little bit about babies and sleep.
The first thing you ought to know is that babies sleep a lot. You probably do know that
already you, just wish that they would sleep all night long. The thing about babies nervous
systems is that they tend to wake up every two, three, or four hours. Often they wake
up to be fed. A baby needs to get to be a certain age and a certain body weight in order
for them to be able to not need nutrition during the night. Sometimes that magic weight
might be somewhere around 12 pounds for example. By the time your child is about 3 to 6 months
old they ought to be sleeping 5 to 9 hours a night. In the mean time you can take some
steps to set it up so that your baby is likely to sleep for longer periods of time. Here’s
some things to do. One is during the day time; make sure that when the baby’s awake that
you provide some stimulation for them. That you talk to them a little bit, that you kind
of keep them a little more awake rather than just letting them sleep as much as they like.
The baby’s been sleeping for 2 or 3 hours during the day. You might kind of go in and
jostle a little bit and see if they aren’t perhaps ready to wake up. The second thing
to pay attention to is the night time routine. You want to signal to your baby that it’s
time to go to bed. What you do when they’re an infant carries over as they get to be several
months old; and you’ll be happy that you did this. You’re going to perhaps give them a
bath. You’re going to put them in some night time clothes. You’re going to give them a
bottle in a calm environment; maybe in their room while you’re rocking them or you’re breastfeeding.
Then you’re going to put them in bed. It’s best to put your baby to bed while they’re
still a little bit awake, you want your baby to get use to putting themselves to sleep.
Once they’re in their crib, then you say goodnight, and you leave the room. If they cry a little
bit don’t rush right back, you’re reinforcing that behavior. If they are crying a lot you’re
going to have to go back in and console them, pat them on the back, talk to them, maybe
start the mobile back up, and then quietly leave; stay calm. So what we are wanting to
do is to establish a good night time routine and also keep them awake a little bit more
during the daytime. Those are two strategies that you can try. Check with your pediatrician
they have a wealth of information at your next well child checkup. Again my name is
Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health and Wellness Consultant and good luck getting a good night
sleep.

First Aid for Burns

First Aid for Burns


– Hello, I’m Emma Hammett,
the founder and CEO of First Aid for Life
and onlinefirstaid.com, and the author of Burns,
Falls, and Emergency Calls, The Ultimate Guide to the
Prevention and Treatment of Childhood Accidents. Today I’m going to talk
to you about burns. Burns are scary. Burns cause long-term damage to the skin, and burns are something that first aid and prompt and appropriate first aid can make a massive difference to the amount of pain and scarring that somebody actually experiences, and the treatment for
burns is incredibly simple. Cool running water. People get really caught up in complicating the treatment for burns. Please don’t put anything else on a burn other than cool running water. That is the best thing to
actually cool down the burn. We are meat, and you are burning, so what we need to do
is cool down the burn. So if it is a scald, and
there is a hot liquid that’s been spilled onto someone, the quandary is do you take
the clothes off or don’t you? Well, the most important thing
is that you’re not removing anything that is stuck to the burn, because if it is stuck to the skin, and you try and remove it, you will rip off more of the skin. So the key thing is, if it is a child who has had a cup of hot
coffee split on them, and it was a cold day and they
were wearing a thick coat, if you’re able to take that
coat off as quickly as you can before the hot liquid has
actually gone through it and gone to their skin, then clearly that is a
very sensible thing to do. If however they were
wearing a cotton T-shirt and when you just try gently to remove it, there is some resistance
there, then leave it on, in which case you would then cool over the top of the clothing. You will be able to cool the burn better without the clothing. So if you are able to remove
it without removing anything that is stuck, then please do so. So the key thing is to cool,
cool, cool, cool, cool, and cool some more. And I can’t impress more
highly how important that is. So cooling the burn will actually
reverse some of the damage that has been done, and can actually lead
to a more severe burn becoming less severe, just because you have cooled
it swiftly and efficiently. Now, keep an eye open for signs of shock because shock is very serious, we’ll cover that in a separate video, but with shock, it is
made worse if someone is scared, in pain, and if they are cold. If you have someone that is burned, they’re likely to be scared. They’re likely to be in pain, and if you are then
cooling the burn on top, you need to make sure that
you’re cooling the burn and keeping the rest of the casualty wrapped up and as warm and
calm as you possibly can. So the key thing is, cool it,
cool it, cool it, cool it, cool it, cool running water is the best. If you don’t have access
to cool running water, then the advice is that any
other suitable liquid will do. And I’m not going to rush
and put coke on a burn, but seriously, if you’re in a supermarket and someone spills a hot drink over you, the easiest thing to do is to
grab some milk, for example, and that would be a very sensible thing, and they would have copious
amounts of milk in a supermarket in the refrigerator section
that you could then pour over to ensure that you’re
not more severely burned and everyone has free coffees going around in a lot of the supermarkets now, and that does have dangers. So, cool it, cool it, cool it. It’s cool running water,
it’s not iced water, so it doesn’t need to be freezing cold and in fact, if you were
to put ice on a burn, you could actually constrict
some of the blood vessels and slow down some of the healing. So it’s just cool running water. And it should be for at least 10 minutes, or until some of the burning
sensation begins to reduce, but that will be at least 10 minutes. Think about taking a joint
of meat out of the oven and leaving it to rest. It takes at least 10 minutes to cool. And so it needs a full 10 minutes plus of cooling. And time it, because if you are running something under cool running water and you have a distressed casualty, it will feel a lot longer
than the 10 minutes. So time it properly, because it does take at least 10 minutes to cool a burn properly. So cool it, cool it, cool
it, cool it, cool it. Don’t rush to dress it. If the burn is bigger than
a 50p piece on a child. Basically burns are measured
according to your palm. So if the burn is bigger than your hand, that is one percent. So for a child, for a baby, it’s tiny, so a 50p piece is a serious burn for them. So if it is red and blistered and it is larger than a 50p piece, I would be phoning an ambulance, and continuing to cool the
burn under cool running water during that time. So cool it, cool it, cool it. If you do want to transport
them to a hospital yourself, all burns should be assessed by a medical or health professional, if you do wish to transport, when I say that, all burns
that require dressing should be assessed by a
medical or health professional, should you wish to
transport them yourself, if it was something like a hand or a foot, you could put that into
a clean plastic food bag and actually depriving the burn of air will make it less painful. So make sure you have cooled
it for at least 15 minutes if you’re contemplating
dressing it yourself. You could use a little bit of cling film. Take a couple of the bits off the top so that it’s more sterile inside, and just loosely wrap it. You don’t want to put
anything tight over a burn, because the burn will swell. And if you put something tight, particularly if it’s round like this, as it expands and swells, you can actually constrict the blood flow, so just loosely over. Please do not attempt to
put any creams or potions or anything else on a burn other than a properly recognised
foil-packed burn dressing, again, once you have
cooled the burn properly. So nothing else that says for minor burns. Please don’t, because
anything that you put on we will have to scrape off in hospital, and that will hurt, and it makes life harder. Burns to the hands,
the feet, the genitals, the throat, and all the way around a limb for the reasons I’ve said
previously, are most serious, and if it is caused by a chemical burn, make sure you run under cool running water for at least 15 minutes and
be careful of the runoff because whatever’s burned them could end up burning you too. I hope that’s been helpful. There’s plenty more
resources on my website, www.firstaidforlife.org.uk, and there’s loads more in my book too, available on Amazon
and in good bookstores. Thank you for listening. That’s Emma Hammett, First Aid for Life.

Burn First Aid / Premiers soins pour les brûlures

Burn First Aid / Premiers soins pour les brûlures


The most common type of burn that we see in the pediatric population are the scald burns. Sixty to seventy percent of our kids are scalded by some kind of hot liquid at home. Soup, coffee, tea, most commonly at home, but can be at parties and restaurants, and it happens usually in the blink of an eye. And parents think that they should just keep the clothes on because they think that if they remove the clothes they might actually take off the skin with the clothes. The unfortunate situation is that– If it stays in the socks or the diaper, or whatever is against the skin, it will deepen the injury because it holds the heat, so the clothing needs to be removed. That’s very simple to do. And then the next thing is that the burn needs to be cooled. And the cooling happens over a period of twenty minutes, and either room temperature or a little bit cooler than room temperature water– not cold and no ice whatsoever, as ice can actually make the burn deeper as well. And if you don’t have running cool water you can also just use cool towels and keep the burn covered for twenty minutes. So the point of applying cool water for the 20 minutes after your child is sustains any kind of burn injury is to stop the burning process. So by doing this you can actually affect the outcome of this burn. We’ve had children that come to the hospital and minimal first aid is done, and this burn actually may change in the first couple days and become a very deep second-degree or a third-degree full-thickness burn. In some instances we can improve the outcome of this burn, by applying appropriate first aid such as cool water. And it’s symptomatic. If you’ve ever burned yourself and you put it under cool water, it will immediately lessen the pain, and it helps stop the burning. So the result of that simple, preventative measure will sometimes allow a burn that may have been very deep to actually not be so deep, and it might heal a little bit sooner. So it’s simple, and it can be done in most homes. Children are very mischievous, they’re curious, and they want to get into everything, and it’s really important that we do not leave children unattended around hot beverages, cooking, around campfires, around hot fireplaces. So it’s really important to be monitoring your children in these situations. When you’re cooking it’s really important to turn those pot handles away so the children cannot reach them. As children are reaching certain milestones, they can reach that counter, they can reach for that cup of hot coffee or hot tea, and when they see that steam it’s very exciting to them and they want to see what’s going on. So it’s really important to– if you do drink hot water, hot tea, hot coffee, to also keep this in some kind of container where you can put a lid on that’s tight, and this will prevent you children from being scalded. So when we talk about burns and we talk about burn first aid, we go on the assumption that the burns are superficial enough, meaning they haven’t burned deep enough into the skin, that they’re small enough that we can control the pain of the children, that they’re in an area that’s easy for them to dress and for the parents to still handle that child, and as long as all of those things are in place, probably they don’t need to go running off to the hospital or emergency room at one o’clock in the morning, and it could be seen over the next twenty-four or forty-eight hours. But burn injuries are difficult to tell at the time of the injury how deep they are, And our recommendation usually is that at some point over the first seventy-two hours that they’re actually seen by someone who’s a little bit more knowledgeable, and has experience with burn injuries.

Thermal, Chemical and Electrical Burns

Thermal, Chemical and Electrical Burns


Jody: Yeah, yeah, just a minute. I’ve got
the grill going right now. It’s just about ready. Just give me a se- , oh, oh, ah, ah,
ah, oh, I can’t believe I did that. Ah. Roy: Burns can be a complex injury because there’s
different degrees of a burn. There’s also different sizes of a burn. We’re gonna take
a quick look here at the different degrees by the way that you can see this bullseye
shape as we go from the less of a degree to the most extreme. The pink outer ring is noting
the first degree burn. It’s noted with redness and pain. Then we move to the second degree
which is usually blistering, whether they are intact or they’re popped, blistering skin
is a second degree burn. And then lastly the dark charred area in the center of the burn
which is dry looking, could be split open or a full thickness burn all the way to the
bone. This is a third degree burn. This can be life threatening, has a lot of complications,
and is nothing to mess around with. I don’t care what the size of it, it needs to be seen
at the emergency care center appropriate for burns. Now how do we treat these burns. Well,
if I saw this, immediately we’re calling 911 and getting emergency medical services on
the way. But the sequence of treatments are such: Remove the body from the burn. So if
he was unconscious and lying in embers, we would remove that. If it was clothing that
was still smoldering, we would move the clothing, safely. But remove the person from the burning
agent. Secondly, cool the burn. Now cooling of the burn means potable water, clean water.
It doesn’t need to be sterile. If it were sterile, that would be great. Cool to cold
water is what we’re looking for. And we’re going to not touch the wound with the bottles,
but we’re going to basically just keep pouring water over the burn. We’re gonna do this for
between five and ten minutes, long enough to actually cool the full thickness of the
tissue and stop the burning process. So let’s say that we’ve cooled this burn now for up
to ten minutes. The tissue is cool. There was a lot of talk in years gone by about a
pre-antibiotic treated gauze or some petroleum based gauze. Now the recommendation for the
current standards is a loose, dry, sterile, if possible, dressing. I am going to just
lightly begin to wrap from above the burn where it started. I’m going to not put a lot
of pressure. Again, in the third degree burn area, most of the nerves have already been
damaged to the point where they’re not actually sensing any pain. But the surrounding tissues
of the first and second degree are going to be excruciating. So we want to keep that idea
in our head as we’re carefully handling the patient. We’re gonna watch this person to
see if they’re showing any signs of dizziness. If at any point, they seem to be losing their
balance, we want to make sure that we get them sitting or lying down in a position of
comfort. So now after we’ve gone ahead and bandaged this burn, there are some significant
points that we need to make. Number one is we need to make sure that we are watching
this person for any signs of inhalation burns. Do they have any swelling or any kind of wheezing.
Do they have burn marks on the facial hair, the eyebrows, the nose hair. If they open
their mouth and we look inside, do they have any soot or granulated burn stuff inside their
mouth. Which would suggest that when the flame exploded, they got scared and inhaled quickly
and may have inhaled that superheated temperature of that air. So it’s all important for us
to keep those in mind because these symptoms might develop into a respiratory problem.
And if that were to happen, we would simply move to treat them. If they become dizzy or
lightheaded, we sit them down, lying them down. But keeping them in the position of
comfort and keeping them out of shock is the most important thing while we wait for EMS
to arrive. Now there’s other forms of burns as well that we should be aware of. And that
is chemical burns. If it was a dry chemical, it would important to carefully, while keeping
ourselves safe, brush off as much of the dry chemical first before we begin to rinse it
off. And then rinsing off the remainder of the wet or dry chemical, we’re going to do
that for no less than fifteen minutes. The solution to pollution is dilution. And that’s
a rhyme that we use so that we understand that even if it’s not washing it off, it’s
diluting the chemical and weakening the chemical. So we just keep diluting that chemical down
helping stop the burn. If it is smoldering clothing, remember we’re gonna remove that
without becoming a patient ourselves either. And then we’re gonna monitor the patient and
watch them until EMS arrives and until the next level of care can take over. So we’ve
covered thermal burns. We’ve covered chemical burns. And the last one I wanna talk about
is electrical burns. Before we ever come in contact with the patient, we need to understand
that the energy source must be removed from the patient. That means deenergizing the source,
getting the professionals out to cut the power to that line that’s fallen down. Whatever
it is that needs to be done, but we cannot risk becoming a second patient by touching
the primary patient and being electrocuted ourselves. Now some significant differences
in electrical burns compared to the other two. Electrical burns tend to have an entry
point and an exit point. The entry point, though it can be small, could have that small
bullseye of the first, second and third degree burn. But the exit point could be explosive
damage. That energy can literally show like an shotgun wound where it exits the ground
of the body. And so on one end of the body we might actually have soft tissue and bleeding
control, while at the entry point we have a burn to take care of. That burn will be
managed the same way we described before with the removing of the burn source, the cooling,
and the dressing. Now some other things to think about, though, is the fact that if that
electric power was so much that it exploded as it exited, it might also have fractured
long bones. So that’s something to keep in mind. And then lastly, remember that the electricity
as it travels through the body could also affect the conductivity of the heart and damage
those conduction points in the heart. And in the next 24 to 72 hours, we can sometimes
see the development of life threatening dysrhythmias develop as this person is pretty relatively
stable from the burn or the wounds themselves, but then develops cardiac issues secondary
to the electrocution. All these things should be kept in mind as we’re treating these different
burn patients and keeping ourselves safe in the meantime as we wait for EMS to arrive
and take the patient to the next level of care.

Child Care & First Aid : How to Treat an Ear Ache

Child Care & First Aid : How to Treat an Ear Ache


You or your child has an earache and you’re
wondering what to do about that. My name is Beverly Bitterman, ARNP, health and wellness
consultant, here with a few tips and strategies for you. The first thing that you might consider
with a child with an earache, is to see if they’re able to clear their ears. And you
can give them, for example a piece of gum or something to chew, and see if they they’re
able to pop their ears and if that helps reduce the pain. Another strategy would be a decongestant.
If you’re dealing with a child that’s over about 3 or an adult, you can try something
like Sudafed, or another decongestant over the counter, and see if taking something that
opens up that tube that goes between the ear and the back of your nose, it’s called the
eustation tube, if you can un-congest that tube, you might be able to resolve the ear
pain. You can also try heat on the ear, you can do that with a washcloth that you wring
out, and put on the ear, hold it on the ear, that moist heat can make it feel better. Another
thing that can help is some warm oil, you can even use something like olive oil, you
can put it in a little cup and run some water in the sink, and put the cup, hold the cup,
so that it gets warm, and then use a drop or pour a little bit into the ear. However,
if those things don’t help, if the onset of the earache was quick and it happened after
a cold, if it involves a fever, you might be in a situation where you have an ear infection,
a bacterial ear infection, and an antibiotic might be helpful for you. If those cases exist,
please call your physician and get an appointment so that they can look in your ear and see
what’s going on there. My name is Beverly Bitterman, ARNP health and wellness consultant,
and I hope that your ear pain is quickly resolved.

Child Care & First Aid : How to Treat a Stye

Child Care & First Aid : How to Treat a Stye


You might have a painful bump on your eye.
It’s kind of red. You’re wondering what it is, and it’s a stye. My name is Beverly Bitterman,
ARNP, Health and Wellness Consultant, and these are common. They’re caused by a clogged
duct in your eyelid, or a hair follicle, that has gotten infected. Now, the good news about
a stye, is that they respond really well to home care treatment. The best thing that you
can do for a stye, is to get a clean washcloth, run it under warm water, hot water from your
faucet. Make sure it’s not too hot ,that it doesn’t burn you, and then take it and wring
it out, and hold it on your eye ,the eye with the stye obviously, and you want to hold it
there until it gets cool, and then repeat that, and the idea is to do that, as many
times a day as you can, and what will happen is, either the stye will just diminish, it
will get smaller, or it will come to a head, and the pus will come out of it, and then
your body will heal it up. If you’re concerned about it, you can seek medical attention.
Your doctor can order antibiotic creams, things like that. However, my experience has shown
that if people are willing to do the hot washcloths, several times a day, and hold it on their
eye, that they could clear it up in a couple of days, two or three days, probably max,
so I recommend that approach. It’s a natural approach. My name is Beverly Bitterman, ARNP,
Health and Wellness Consultant, and I hope that that stye goes away sooner ,rather than
later.