Dog CPR: Unconscious & Not Breathing

Dog CPR: Unconscious & Not Breathing


– If you suspect that
a dog is unconscious, you need to approach from behind. You start by touching them
with the back of your foot and speak to them as well. So you’re not kicking them, you’re just touching them gently with the back of your foot. You would then touch them
with the back of your hand, it’s less invasive than
the front of your hand as far as they’re concerned. If there is no response at all, you need to open their airway. So you tilt the head and
lift their chin back, you pull their tongue forward a bit, and you check to see if they’re breathing. So you would feel the breath, you could use a bit of your hair and see if it’s moving
underneath their nose. And you can feel if they’re breathing. If they’re not breathing,
you need to start CPR. If they are breathing, you would put them into
the recovery position on their right-hand side. So if they’re not breathing, you need to then hold
their mouth together, and you’re going to breathe
in through their nose. And use a face shield. So if you’ve got a face shield, or something to protect
yourself, that’s a good idea. And always gain consent from the owner before giving CPR to somebody else’s dog. So you hold their jaw together, and you’re going to breathe into them, not breathing a full breath, because our lungs are
bigger than theirs are. So you’re going to breathe into
them and see the chest rise. You’re going to breathe in at a rate of one every three seconds, and you’re going to give
five initial breaths. So holding in. And see if that’s helped them
to start breathing themselves. If it hasn’t, I’m now going to check to
see if there is a pulse. So, I’m going to use
my three middle fingers and I’m going to feel
just inside their back leg and see if there is any form of a pulse or I could put my hand and see if their heart
appears to be beating. If there is a pulse, but they’re not breathing, I’m now going to give another 20 breaths. So that’s about one
minute’s worth of breaths to see if that will prompt them to start breathing themselves. So again, I would hold their jaw together. I would breathe into them
to inflate their lungs. So I’ll be doing that up to 20 times. If after that, they still haven’t started
breathing themselves, then I will need to start
doing chest compressions. When I’m breathing into them, I’m being the lungs for them. When I’m pushing on their chest I’m being the heart. So I’m being a heart and lung machine to keep their heart and their brain full of oxygenated blood so that once they get to the vet there’s a much better chance
of them making a full recovery. So, I’ve checked danger,
I’ve approached them. I’ve checked for response. There’s no response. I’ve opened the airway,
I’ve checked for breathing. They’re not breathing. I’ve given them breaths and now I’m going to give
them the compressions. So behind them like this. For most dogs you will be
pushing just on the side here. So just behind their front legs and that’s where the
heart would be positioned. For something like a whippet, it’s slightly more in
the triangle between them and if you have one of
the flat-chested dogs like a bulldog or a pug, then you might want to
roll them on their back and you can be doing CPR on them while they’re on their back. So put your hand over like this, the over hand over the top and I’m pushing down hard and fast. 30 compressions and then
after the 30 compressions I would go back to
giving two breaths again. So 30 to two, 30 to two. Now the Blue Cross say that
if you haven’t had any luck and they haven’t come back to life within about three or five minutes, it’s highly unlikely that they
are going to make a recovery. Give it your best shot. You are doing the very best
possible that you can for them and get them to a vet
as quickly as possible.

First Aid – Open The Airway: Child

First Aid – Open The Airway: Child


Opening the airway for a child. When you’re unconscious,
your muscles relax. Your tongue is a huge, great muscle attached to your bottom jaw. People talk about swallowing your tongue. You can’t swallow your tongue. But what they mean is
that the tongue relaxes and it ends up flopping down
and blocking your airway. The way to open someone’s airway is to tilt the head and lift the chin. It takes the back of the tongue off the back of the airway. Now, for an adult, you’d
go all the way back. For a child, you put one hand on the head, two fingers on the chin and you don’t have to go quite as far back. And that will be all that needs to happen to open the airway. So it may be that they
weren’t breathing before and when you open the
airway, they start breathing, which is great to know. The other problem that you have is that the sphincter that keeps the contents of your
stomach in your stomach relaxes and opens when you’re unconscious. So if you are lying on your back, the contents of your
stomach will trickle up and drip into your lungs. This is why the recovery
position is so important. Because if you’re in
the recovery position, the contents of your stomach
will then trickle out and they won’t end up
causing any problems.

Pool safety: first response safety steps that could save a life

Pool safety: first response safety steps that could save a life


As we head towards summer, it’s important to be reminded of what to do if there is an incident around the pool. D is for danger. Make sure you check for danger, for yourself, for other people, and for your casualty. R is for response. See if you can get a response from your casualty. S is for send for help. If you can’t send for help, send someone else to call 000 and make sure that they come back. A is for airways. Check the airways. If there is an obstruction, make sure you clear it. B is for breathing. Look, listen and feel for any sign of normal breathing for 10 seconds. C is for CPR. Commence CPR, and just remember, it’s 30 compressions to two breaths. D is for defibrillator. Attach the device and follow the prompts. Make sure you stay safe this summer.

Ken Jeong AHA Hands-Only CPR video

Ken Jeong AHA Hands-Only CPR video


A movie! Sounds like. Slingshot. Oh, uh a
bird? a blowfish? It’s definitely a romantic comedy. “Wind beneath my wings??” Falling
down!?!? Ummmm. **music starts** **phone rings** Has this ever happened to you? A harmless
game of charades based on film titles turning into a sudden cardiac event. BAM! SHACLACKY! No? What? You think you’re better than me?!? Well it happens alright. It’s a real life
situation! I got my daughters here…call 9-1-1. Push
hard and fast! Focus! And yes, the beat to Staying Alive really
works. Disco can save lives. Yes, disco. Check it out. What do you think? What? **music** Dance Party!!!

First Aid & Safety Procedures : How to Clear an Obstructed Airway

First Aid & Safety Procedures : How to Clear an Obstructed Airway


You know at some point in life, during time
in life we may encounter an individual or a victim of an accident or injury that has
an obstructed airway. Hi I’m Captain Joe Bruni. And what we are going to demonstrate and talk
about is how to clear the obstructed airway. The obstructed airway can be cleared by using
the finger sweep technique. Before we attempt any type of finger sweep technique we have
to determine if the airway is actually obstructed. The first thing we would do is tilt the head
using the chin lift technique and try to deliver rescue breathes after we look,listen and feel
to determine if the victim is exchanging air. If they are not exchanging air because of
an airway obstruction, we would deliver two rescue breaths like forcefully, pinching off
the nose and covering the patient’s mouth and blowing air down through the airway. If
air will not go through we would reposition the head unless we suspect a spinal cord injury.
If there is a spinal cord injury we would leave the head in the position found and use
the jaw thrust technique of reaching into the mouth, grabbing under the chin, grabbing
the tongue and pulling the jaw and the tongue forward, towards the feet. We would then look
inside the airway to see if we see the obstruction and if we see the obstruction, take a finger
and do a blind finger sweep through the mouth and the airway to try and eliminate the obstruction.
Then try and deliver rescue breaths once again. Activate the emergency response system and
wait for arrival of responding EMT’s and Paramedics. I’m Captain Joe Bruni, stay safe and we will
see you next time.

First Aid & CPR Basics : How to Tell If the Victim is Breathing During CPR

First Aid & CPR Basics : How to Tell If the Victim is Breathing During CPR


Hi again, I’m Michelle of the AD HOC Group.
In this segment, I’ll demonstrate how to assess a victim for breathing. This involves
positioning the head correctly and then to look, listen and feel for breathing. The techniques
we’re going to demonstrate are the same for adults and for children over 1 year old.
First, you’ll position the head to open the airway, place the outer edge of one hand
across the forehead, and the fingers of the other hand under the jaw bone, and gently
rotate the head backward by lifting the jaw and rocking the head backwards. Positioning
the head in this manner will lift the tongue from the back of the throat and open the airway.
Next, lean down, close enough to place your cheek above the victim’s mouth and nose
and look at the chest. Spend at least five seconds and no more than ten seconds watching
for the chest to rise, listening for the sound of air moving and feeling for the warmth of
movement of air. If it doesn’t rise, reposition the head and give a second breath. A person
breathing normally will take at least one breath during that time, enough to raise the
chest so that you can clearly see it move. If you don’t see the chest rise or feel
or hear air moving from the mouth and nose, you will need to give two rescue breaths.
I’ll show you how this is done in the next clip. Please note that the newest guidelines
don’t include teaching the jaw thrust technique because this as well as several other steps
take extra time, cause confusion and tend to delay the start of compressions.