What to expect at a personal injury consultation I Colorado Springs Car Accident Lawyer

What to expect at a personal injury consultation I Colorado Springs Car Accident Lawyer


(upbeat music) – What to expect at a
personal injury consultation. Hi, I’m attorney Chris Nicolaysen, an attorney over at Springs Law Group here in Colorado Springs. Today, I wanted to talk to you about what to expect when you’ve been
injured in an accident and then decide to meet with
an attorney at a consultation. So one of the first things
that we do at Springs Law Group is we send out what’s
called an intake form. And that form is gonna have
a lot of information on it and it may seem a little daunting, but it’s gonna be very, very helpful in helping us get the best use of our time and your time during
the consultation itself. Then after that, you’re gonna come in and actually have a meeting. And that meeting is the consultation and that’s gonna be held
with an attorney at our firm. And we like to do that
because we wanna meet your face to face as the
attorneys in the office. You’re not gonna meet with a paralegal, you’re not gonna meet with an
investigator or anyone else. One of the things we like to do is we like to meet our clients. Then what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna have a conversation during that time. We’re gonna use your intake
form as kind of the overview, but we’re gonna dig down a little deeper. So we’re gonna talk to you about the circumstances that
led to the accident, and then we’re gonna start
asking some questions. Questions like what were your injuries, have you seen anyone for treatment, and if so, who have you seen. Questions like what was
the weather like that day, the day of the accident. Were you wearing your seatbelt, why were you driving that day, were you driving for work purposes. ‘Cause if you were
driving for work purposes, there may be a workman’s comp claim outside of a personal injury claim and those would be things that would have to be looked at there too. So we’re gonna kind of take that overview and talk about
all of those issues. Additionally then too, what we’re gonna then do after that is we’re gonna talk about the timeline. Kind of what a process
looks like from the case at the very beginning till
all the way at the end. And we’re gonna give you a roadmap that talks about what our role is as the attorneys and the law firm, and then what your role
is as well as the client. And one of the big things that we always want our clients to do is
work on getting better. We want them to take care of
themselves over anything else and we’ll work on a
lot of the other stuff. And then lastly, we’re gonna
review the fee agreement. We’re gonna talk about money. And so we’re gonna talk about basically what kind of fees we charge, what it looks like, which in our world it’s a contingency fee basis. And then we’re gonna talk about as we walk through the fee agreement, what the terms of service are. We wanna make sure that you’re well informed through the process. But the biggest thing too we wanna do is we wanna make sure we’re a good fit. And what we mean by fit is
that we like each other. That we trust each other because we really wanna do business with people and we want you to do business with us with people that we know, like and trust. So at an intake, it’s more than just kind of checking boxes and
going through all the data. It’s also about finding the right fit. Making sure that we wanna
do business together. At Springs Law Group, it’s really important for us that we do business with clients that we like an that we feel like we can help. We wanna make sure too that you feel like you can trust us as well. And one of the big things too
we wanna make sure that you do is understand that at any
point in time in your case, at the consultation, and
once you’ve hired us, and then down the road, that you can always ask questions. So for us, that’s what you
can expect at an intake. You can meet with an actual attorney, we’re gonna talk to you about
the summary of the case, we’re gonna give you a timeline, we’re gonna walk through
your fee agreement, and then lastly we’re gonna
see if we’re a good fit. So hopefully this helped
answer some questions about what happens in a consultation with an attorney at Springs Law Group. If you do have any questions, feel free and give us a call. If you’ve been injured in an accident, we’d be more than happy to sit down and schedule a consultation with you. (upbeat music)

Trapped and Injured – Chicago Med (Episode Highlight)

Trapped and Injured – Chicago Med (Episode Highlight)


♪♪ -You okay?
-I’m fine. -How’s the boy? -Sats are down to 82. -What about your shoulder? -It’s all right.
I’m fine. ♪♪ ♪♪ -Got it?
-Yeah. [ Winces ] ♪♪ -Wait. Stop. Let me see if I can pry open
another window. -I told you, I’m fine. -Natalie, hold on.
You don’t have to be a hero. -Ow. -Come on! What do you want
to do, damage the nerve? -I don’t need your medical
advice, Will.

Heather Investigates Serious Injuries With Holly Lawrence, Terenzo Bozzone & Ellie Salthouse

Heather Investigates Serious Injuries With Holly Lawrence, Terenzo Bozzone & Ellie Salthouse


– Imagine these scenarios. Getting knocked off your bike, waking up in hospital
with a fractured face and a severe concussion
when you’re at the peak of your Ironman career or just over a year after
becoming 70.3 World Champion, you fracture your foot, find yourself in a non-weight bearing boot for three months throughout
the key part of the season. Or you have a niggle that
goes on for 15 months, stopping you from racing to your potential and ends up resulting and progressing into a stress fracture. Let’s start by setting the scene and find out a little bit more exactly what happened to
each of those athletes. – I was taken off, out
riding, I think by a truck but no one knows what happenened. – So I had a hamstring tendinopathy which eventually turned into
a little stress fracture on my ischium and I dealt
with it for 15 months. – And for people who don’t know, I’m not asking you to show exactly where, but I know last time I spoke to you, you’re saying it’s basically the bone underneath your pelvis. – Yeah, essentially, to the laymen it’s called the Sit bone. It’s a bone obviously you sit on. – I’ve broke the
navicular bone in my foot. – It’s those steps after the
injury that you can control. So this is where we can
learn from the pros. Understanding and accepting your injury, coming to terms with
it is the hardest part as they explain. – You know the mental
side is just so big and I really didn’t deal with it very well and I never really understood
and then everyone says, Oh you can now enjoy
yourself and now that you’re not training and racing. But it’s just the worst thing. And I think more than anything it’s like a chemical thing that you’re used to doing something everyday that gives you this endorphins and whatever it
is, the chemical side of it. And then you suddenly go without and it’s like your whole world
is being turned upside down, so yeah it’s just pretty tough
and just keeping positive and looking after your health’s probably most important I think. – At the time I could reflect and go, if there ever was an
excuse to end my career and get on with something else in life, That was kind of the moment that I could leverage off but I didn’t even need to think about it. It kind of slip straight in my head. I’ve got unfinished
business, I love the sport, and I love the adventures and the journeys we get to go on and that
was motivation enough so basically right then,
had a bad concussion, broken hand, I was a little bit out of it, but I kind of said Okay, Kona’s a good few months away, let’s set that as a goal. And at least that way,
I’d incentivize myself to get up everyday, do the
monotonous eye exercises I had to do for my Vestibular system, balance stuff and all those
little bits and pieces. – Once you know exactly
what you’re dealing with, it’s about putting a plan in place, and this can be tricky. You need to make sure you seek the correct advice and then you trust in this and you stick to that plan that you’ve been given. Terenzo was obviously really determined to prove his comeback
and possibly a little bit too fast but he did
then realise this before damaging his body any further. Holly and Ellie on the other hand, stuck to a much stricter plan. – It kind of, during
the two weeks in Kona, it started at about 40
minutes into a ride, I would get a headache and then
by the end of the two weeks I was getting up to 3 1/2
hours before the headaches kicked in and the headaches
were a lot more minor. But flying home, kind
of headache kicked in. And I was like You know
what, just need to regroup. – It was on the way home
you made the decision? – Yeah, so I was going home
for 10 days and the plan was to come back 10 days before the race, but that was, yeah I just kind of said Okay, I need to regroup, refocus. A little bit more time for recovery. And yeah, Ironman WA
in Busso last weekend, that was kind of, that
was the next benchmark. So I put that in the sand and that’s what kind of kept me motivated
and kept me going. Kinda said Okay, cool. If I get two weeks before that and things aren’t looking good,
then I’ll go into off-season chill out till the start of 2019. – It was a long, long time. Three months nearly in total in a cast. – Over summer as well, race season. – Yeah over race season. But yeah, it gets you to
work on your mental game, and makes you kind of test
how much you actually want to be back and do the sport. – Initially I was just in pain and we took a little bit of
time off and I came back and, I mean, it was good and bad, it had it’s moments, you know. Eventually, it got to
the point, I would race and it would be terrible again. I’d take another month or so off. I’d race again and get
cleared to run and ride, race again and again it would be awful. So we took another few months. It just kept going like that. It continued this cycle. Take a few months off and then race again. – Sometimes a more obvious
injury, such as a fracture, can be a little bit easier to deal with, as you have a scan and
then you get a time frame for the healing process
and it might be visible if you’re wearing a cast
or a boot for example. But something like
concussion or a tendinopathy such as Terenzo and Ellie experienced, can be a little bit harder
to deal with mentally. Now I know the injuries
were very specific to Holly, Terenzo, and Ellie
but I wanted to find out what treatment options they were given. – You know there were
people who had gone through this before that I spoke to. A lot of them had gone through surgery, because they found like a labral tear, so I had scans and everything for that. And eventually what we came down to was two cortisone injections
into the high hamstring and see how that would go and, touch wood, thus far it’s been perfect since June. – What other treatment
have you had before that, because I know it sounds
like so much investigation and of course the injection
sounds like something that might have happened sooner, but what other things did
they try before doing that? – Well, the thing is
they don’t like injecting cortisone into a hamstring. They’re very reluctant to do that, so it took a lot of convincing
to get those injections. But yeah, I tried pretty much everything. I tried dry needling, I tried ultrasound, I tried shockwave therapy. I had two glucose injections. I forget now, it’s been a while and I’ve kind of put it behind me. – Yeah of course. – But I had other injections that were supposed to be just as– – Stimulate the healing. – Exactly, yeah. I mean I exhausted every avenue
before I went to cortisone. – I tried PRP injections
so they take your blood out and inject it into the tendon. Cortisone, shock therapy. I tried a whole bunch of stuff
and nothing seemed to work. That was the one part. I wasn’t able to run when I went to Kona for those two weeks in
September for a training camp. – There’s more than just
the physical changes after coming back from an injury. Often gives athletes a
different perspective on racing and that’s why we see
athletes coming back even stronger than before they
had that enforced time-off. We’ve obviously seen
Terenzo and Ellie come back with really strong performances already and Holly is just as the start of hers. And I wanted to see how their
perspective had changed. – I probably look at
the races differently. I don’t race so much differently. Probably that’s changed
over the last couple years. You kind of get a little
bit emotionally more mature and you can understand how to
pace yourself through races a bit better which has been really good. But the perspective of
being able to get out there and get on the start line and still be able to do what I love. That definitely just
makes it more meaningful and I mean, when I stood
on the start line in Western Sydney my wife was
there with me and she like, There’s no exceptions, you
don’t need to do anything. The thing is you’re here
you’re doing what you love and you’ve got through so
much in the last five months. And that’s what makes it special. – Yeah, I think for me
it’s definitely about learning from this experience and when I first get pain, I think I definitely need to
listen to the warning signs and deal with it before
it becomes a bigger issue. That’s the one thing I really learnt. And yeah, just about being patient and everyone told me to be patient and I wanted to throw something
at them but it is true. You need to be patient
and just wait it out and seek as much advice
and help as possible because there’s so many opinions out there about everything and so
if you can get as many as possible, you can make your own and build your own rehab plan. So yeah, definitely I
think getting advice and listening to your body is probably the two biggest pieces of advice. – Yeah, I mean, probably the
biggest thing I’ve learnt that just about the strength
stuff of not neglecting the small strengthening
and even the simple balance work that you
know, you run so much and then you can’t do balance exercises, so just like the little
supporting muscles, which has kind of been big for me. I really hope you’ve
watched this because you’re interested in the topic, not because you’re dealing
with an injury yourself but whatever the reason
there are definitely some valuable points we can all learn from, patience though, being the
hardest one to accept for sure. If you have enjoyed this
hit the thumb up like button and make sure you get all
of our videos here at GTN. Just hit the globe to subscribe and remember to click
on the link for the shop if you like the look
of any of the GTN kit. And as we’re on the topic of injury, we have made a video earlier on 6 Injury Prevention Exercises. You can find that here. And if you want to see Sebastion Kienle’s Injury
Prevention Secrets, that video is just here.

Where You’ll be Injured In A Motorcycle Accident

Where You’ll be Injured In A Motorcycle Accident


If you ride a motorcycle, then you already know it’s one of the greatest pleasures in life. But it doesn’t come without its risks, especially if you live in Eastern Europe. In this video, we’ll look at where you’re likely to be injured in a motorcycle accident, with or without proper gear. Many riders who wear both a jacket and gloves sustain cuts and bruises on their forearm and wrist due to ill fitting gear. Often, a short glove will not offer full protection for this area, especially when the arm is extended. A gauntlet glove however will extend further and hold the sleeve in place. Important features you should look for in a glove are a palm slider, for when your hand impacts on the road, as well as protection for the knuckles. Some studies have shown that a glove where the pinky and ring finger are held together reduces fractures in this bones. Good quality jackets will have armor covering both the shoulder, elbow and your forearm. Aim for CE2 rated armor – it absorbs at least 71% more energy than CE1 armor. Be very cautious of cheaper jackets that only cover the elbow and not the forearm. You’re feet are the most likely part of your body to hit the road in a crash, even more so than your hands. If you can’t afford actual motorcycle boots, at least wear something like a work boot. Studies have shown they reduce the possibility of injury almost as much as armored motorcycle boots on the street. And if you can do this with a shoes, they will come off in a crash. There’s little you can do to prevent spinal damage as it’s more likely that such an injury is caused by bending and torsional forces on the spine and not direct impacts that a back protector is designed for. They will at least however reduce brusing and tissue damage from a slide. Padding on your hips can assist here as it will absorb some of the energy, reducing those torsional forces Keep in mind that most Kevlar jeans don’t come with knee armor and almost none offer protection on the hip or thighs. This means that while the reduce abrasion injuries, they won’t to anything to minimize bruises or fractures. Most textile pants and Kevlar jeans that don’t come with armor at least have the provision for you to add it in later. There really isn’t a huge amount you can do to prevent a fracture to your legs in a serious enough crash. The forces exerted on a body spiraling in the air or hitting another object means that current armor can only do so much. But they will greatly reduce cuts, bruises and sprains. High boots with some shin protection which overlaps your pants armor will help. In one study, over eighty percent of riders with head injuries, were either not wearing a helmet or it came off. Type of helmet is important, with riders who choose to wear an open face helmet 25% more likely to sustain an injury than those that wear full face helmets. And to ensure the helmet you’re buying is safe, visit the UK Government’s website, SHARP which does crash testing on various motorcycle helmets.

5 Most Common Injuries In Pro Cycling & How They’re Treated | Tour de France 2018

5 Most Common Injuries In Pro Cycling & How They’re Treated | Tour de France 2018


(electronic music) – Well, here we are in Chambery the morning after the Roubaix stage of the 2018 Tour de France and we’ve been lucky enough
to grab half an hour of time with Dr. Kevin Sprouse, who is the team doctor at Team EF Drapac. Kevin, thank you very much for you time. Could you tell me, what are the five most common
injuries you see in riders? – I think number one is road rash, and that, unfortunately, we saw yesterday and is something that we’re
working on continuously now. It’s hard to rank them in
terms of how common they are because there’s some subtleties there but I think I’ll run through the five that I think I see most commonly. So, road rash, clavicle
fractures, wrist injuries, concussions unfortunately,
and then knee problems. Those are usually chronic overuse things. – And so let’s start with
road rash if that’s okay. So road rash, when I was a rider we used to joke about it
being trivial and superficial and it, I mean, it
literally is superficial but it can be a really serious problem, especially if it’s a large area and if it causes significant discomfort, it can change riding styles. And can you tell me, just roughly, how you deal with a
large area of road rash? – Sure, so when treating
road rash, this is kinda the, this is the bag of tricks
that I carry with me, we use a porous surgical
tape to hold it on. Omnifix is the one I have
with me, but we kinda grab what’s available in the
pharmacies when we run out. But this is a tape that I use. Telfa dressings are just a nonstick gauze, something you can just get
at your local pharmacy. You’ve probably seen it before,
kind of a shiny coat to it so it doesn’t stick to the wound. On top of that, we’ll put just
a triple antibiotic ointment. In the US, we call this Neosporin, this is a generic version,
but you just put it on there and that’ll go directly on the wound. And then occasionally we’ll use what you have probably seen on the riders, this burn netting. So this is something that my
seven-year-old loves cycling and he’s gotten to where when he falls off he insists that I put this
on his knees and his elbows. But you’ve probably seen this
on riders in the Peloton, just holding bandages on. We’ll often use it on
the knee and the elbow, those areas that are moving consistently over the course of the
four-to-six-hour stage, otherwise this stuff will
start to shift and migrate as it gets sweaty, and you’ll
end up with the bandage off and just being irritated. So this is a good way just
to put on top of all that and hold it in place. And all this is stuff that
you can get from the pharmacy. You don’t need a special
medical license or anything to get it, it’s pretty
straightforward stuff. – So clavicles, we do joke as cyclists that you’re not a real cyclist until you’ve broken your
collarbone, which is not true. But it is a very– (laughs) – Still have mine. – It is a very common cycling
injury, though, isn’t it? – [Kevin] It is. – [Interviewer] Can you first
tell us a bit about why? Is it something to do
with the force transfer when someone… – Absolutely, it’s how cyclists fall. And so when then hands are on the bars and they’re going at a
relatively high speed, oftentimes what you’ll see is, sometimes they go straight over the bars but more often than not, there’s a maneuver to
try to avoid a crash, and the wheel turns, and then
they’re going down sideways, and the kind of innate
tendency, the reflex, is to throw your hand out, and
that force is transmitted up, and often the clavicle, being
kind of an S-shaped bone, has the weak spot in
the chain and it snaps. – Yeah, and you’re about to show me this incredible ultrasound device. Talk me through this, so– – Yeah, so it’s great, at
the Tour, we’re very lucky to have an X-ray machine
at the end of every stage. They don’t do that at many races. The Giro does it, but I think
it’s only those two races, so a lot of times, if we’re
worried about a fracture, then we’re really left looking for an emergency department, a hospital. It’s logistically demanding. It can take a long time
out of the rider’s recovery and everything they have
to do in the evening. So we’ve got the added benefit
now of having these devices, ultrasound device, which can take a look at superficial bones like
the clavicle very easily, can take a look at the wrists, hand, foot. So what do we wanna take a look at? Wrist.
– Scaphoid? – Scaphoid, we’ll kinda
look at the distal radius and down into the scaphoid here. And so it’s, this gel
allows the sound waves, which is what’s coming out
of the transducer here, to kinda be transmitted to the skin, down through the bone, or to the bone, and give us a picture of the cortex there. And you can see that
it’s nice and continuous and I can kind of move
back and forth across it. And we go down, if you
were to have a fracture then we might see that right there where that line is real continuous there’d be a step-off,
a quite noticeable one. – [Interviewer] Right, Kevin,
can you talk us through wrist injuries and hand injuries, please? – Sure, so we talked about
clavicles and how the reason why riders end up kinda twisted and going down with the hand out and the clavicle tends
to take the brunt of that but as you can imagine,
the wrist and the hand are, I mean, they’re making
impact with the ground. And so you’re at risk for
a skin injury, of course, but the bones of the wrist and the small bones in
the base of the hand, kinda where the hand meets the wrist, oftentimes are victims
to these falls, as well. The radius is the bone here
on the side of the thumb, the side of the hand that has the thumb, and then the ulna is over here. The scaphoid is a little bone that sits right down in this divot. – [Interviewer] Yeah. – And that’s one that is
often injured, as well. So when a rider goes down,
a lot of times we’re looking at those bones, at the
cartilage and tendons– – Yeah.
– That surround there, and then the bones there
in the base of the hand. – [Interviewer] Yeah. – But some of these are difficult to heal, and so this is not something
that someone would ride with. They’d be out of a race. But this little scaphoid bone, because of the way the
blood comes into it, it actually comes, the
blood supply goes down, it passes the bone, and then
comes backwards toward it, so you can, when you fracture the bone, you can actually cut off the blood supply, which obviously makes it difficult
if not impossible to heal so sometimes these little
fractures become surgical, so you wanna catch them early. – [Interviewer] So tell me about knees. It’s one of the few things
I didn’t have wrong with me on a bike, so… (laughs) – Perfect! No, knees, obviously there’s
traumatic injuries to knee, so you fall off the
bike, you hit your knee, that’s a problem that comes up, but honestly, what I see more often is that the knee is the victim
of chronic overuse injuries. And what that means is that there’s maybe a muscular imbalance
or a positioning issue. Usually it’s both. The treatment of it is
gonna depend on the cause. And so, a lot of times, that
means taking a step back and looking at their movement, looking at their strength
patterns, looking at their fit. Did they change their cleats? Did they change their saddle height? Oftentimes maybe they didn’t
do those things on purpose, so they’ve been traveling and they get back on their bike at home and the seatpost has slid a little bit and we have them measure it and it’s like, ah, it’s down two centimeters,
or a centimeter, or whatever. And so, looking for kind
of a root cause there often involves going away from the knee and looking at fit, hip
strength, core strength, and seeing what is stressing the knee and what’s causing it to hurt. – Kevin, concussions, I
remember this all too well. It’s very unpleasant. Talk us through, one, diagnosis, and then what you do with
a rider with a concussion. – So concussion is something
that certainly affects cyclists and is something that we see throughout the course of the year, and something that, over
the last five to 10 years, we’ve really learned
as a medical community that we probably need
to take more seriously. In my training, concussion
diagnosis and management was a very big piece of
the educational puzzle and something that we focused a lot on. And I think you see in
cycling that that’s mirrored, that we’re starting to
have these protocols that are implemented, we’re
starting to recognize it and just be aware of it a lot more. It can be difficult because
the diagnosis of concussion is a subjective one, which
means that there’s no test that tells us someone has a concussion. You can’t scan them,
you can’t do blood work, and so then it’s very much
looking at their balance, it’s looking at their
recall and their memory, and it’s looking at the
symptoms that they relay to us. So we’re kind of at their mercy in some regards with what they tell us. – It’s hard for me to imagine
how, as a doctor, you can, it must be so hard making
that kind of diagnosis, or trying to, at least
the initial diagnosis, under time pressure, because
while it might sound, maybe, to our viewers like
better safe than sorry, what about if you pull
someone out on day three of a Grand Tour and they
don’t have concussion? Just because they might
have hit their head, you can’t do that, it’s not
fair on the team or the rider. – No. – And so you have to give
the benefit of the doubt to keep riding to start with, I guess. – I would err on the side
of better safe than sorry. – Yeah.
– If I’ve got a concern– – Yeah. – If there’s something
that’s just not right, done. – Yeah. – And if I end up pulling
somebody without a concussion when I shouldn’t have, I’d
rather make that decision. Now it will eat at me. (laughs) – Yeah. – Like if we get back to the hotel and they’re perfectly fine, everything, I’ll be kicking myself
but I would rather that than put them back in
and be kicking myself for other reasons.
– Yeah. – The other tricky thing
with concussion is symptoms usually present over time.
– Yeah. – It’s actually pretty
uncommon in my experience that a rider goes down, hits their head, and is standing there with the bike and immediately has concussion symptoms. – Yeah. Kevin, thank you so much,
that’s been fascinating. And to recap for the viewers,
so the most common injuries that pro riders see
are probably road rash, broken collarbone, wrist injuries,
concussion, and knee pain and I think that’s probably the same for most recreational cyclists, too. So I hope you found this interesting. Kevin, thank you again, and good luck for the rest of the Tour. – Thank you. – If you like this video,
give us a thumbs up, click subscribe, and click down
here for more Tour content.

Top 10 Most Common Cycling Injuries

Top 10 Most Common Cycling Injuries


Concussion Crashes are a part of cycling, and unfortunately
so are head injuries.  Concussions are a form of brain injury resulting from a direct
blow.  Wearing a helmet significantly reduces the chances of injury, but cannot completely
prevent concussion. Achilles tendinitis If you’ve got pain in the Achilles through
cycling the it’s likely to be Achilles tendinitis, which is an inflammation commonly associated
with overuse.  It can also be brought on by poor bike fit or an issue with cleat position. Patellar Tendinitis Tendinitis of the knee.  This is commonly
associated with  having your saddle too low, or if you grind a big gear and your glute
muscles aren’t working as hard as they should be. Broken Clavicle Otherwise known as a broken collarbone, this
is the most common ‘break’ in cycling, commonly caused by putting your arm down to
save yourself in a low speed crash.  Once you impact the floor, the collarbone is often
the weakest link of the chain, and first to snap.   Pro tip: try to keep hold of the handlebars
when you crash! Broken scaphoid If your collarbone isn’t the weak link in
a fall, then your scaphoid bone often is.  The scaphoid is one of the carpal bones
on the thumb side of the wrist.  Often not visible on X-rays, this fracture is frequently
mistaken for a simple wrist strain. When the scaphoid breaks it can cause significant
problems because there is only blood supply into one end of the bone.  Left untreated,
if there is a fracture, it can lead to avascular necrosis, which, effectively, is cellular
death of bone. Fractured pelvis If you don’t put your hand down to break
your fall, the first point of contact with the ground when you crash is often your hip.
 Pelvic fractures are common amongst amateur and professional cyclist alike, and as fractures
go, this one is particularly painful.  It normally doesn’t lead to any major complications,
unless it was a particularly bad break. Saddle sores Basically, saddle sores are a skin disorder,
and the biggest cause appears to simply be long hours in the saddle.  However, not riding
with a chamois, riding in dirty shorts, having your saddle too high or using a cheap saddle
can also cause this unwanted irritation.  Plus wearing any items of clothing under your shorts
will not help! Lower back pain You’ll often hear cyclists complaining of
this when riding.  In addition to feeling twisted or ‘blocked’, the discomfort often
means riders are unable to get full power through the pedals. It’s often caused by
a bad bike fit, long hours spent in an un-natural position, and the constant vibration coming
from the road. Lower back problem can lead to feelings of
a-symettry in the pedal stroke.  It’s important to make sure these issues, if they continue,
are addressed because if you continue riding it can lead to problems elsewhere such as
your knees. Neck pain Similarly to lower back pain, soreness or
sharp pains in the neck can normally be put down to spending a long time in a fixed position.
 This leaves the neck in extension for long periods of time which can impinge the neck
joints leading to irritation.  Equally, a faulty bike fit can lead to the same issues. Numbness of the hand Officially known as Thoracic outlet syndrome,
or TOS, this is a condition where the blood vessels or nerves are compressed as they pass
from the neck region to the arm, resulting in numbness and/or pain in the arms and hands.
 This is often a result of tight muscles around the neck area, and can be relieved
with proper stretching, which will in turn promote circulation in that area. The typical area that can cause entrapment
of the thoracic outlet is the neurovascular bundle (which is the nerve and the blood supply)
which can get trapped by the scalene muscles and the first rib.