Lateral Inversion – Why is ambulance written in reverse? | #aumsum


Topic: Lateral Inversion. Why is ambulance written in reverse? Maybe because there is some secret code hidden in it. You’re just impossible. It is because mirrors form laterally inverted images. Lateral inversion is a phenomenon. Due to which the left side of an object appears to be the right side in the mirror. The right side appears to be the left side. Which hand are you raising now? Left, Right, Left. Ok, Don’t get angry. Let’s get back to the question. We know that ambulance is an emergency vehicle. Hence, when the driver of the front vehicle
will see the ambulance in the rear view mirror. He will see the laterally inverted image of the word and thus read it correctly, giving way to the ambulance.

How Much Can Bicycles Change Communities? | World Bicycle Relief On GCN

How Much Can Bicycles Change Communities? | World Bicycle Relief On GCN


– It’s World Bicycle Relief Week here on GCN, helping to change lives through the power of bicycles. In the second of our
series, we follow Chris, a farmer, as he goes
about his daily routine now with the help of a Buffalo Bike. (Zambians singing) – Today, we are in Zambia on a farm, Christopher’s farm to be exact. He is in the background
somewhere milking cows, which he’s been doing for an hour already. It’s 5:30 a.m. and I think he’s going to give me a go as well. So, let’s go on in. (rooster crows) (milking) Christopher, thank you for
having us at your farm. – No, it’s no problem. – We’re going to follow you
for some of this morning. So first, is that you’re going to let me have a go at milking, briefly. What’s the plan after that? Are we going to load the
bike up with the milk and take it to the distribution centre? – Yes, yes, that’s the plan. That we now start milking,
and we load the bike with the milk on the
bikes, and then we deliver. – Okay, I think we’re going to see if I’m strong enough to load the
milk into the bike, as well. It sounds like it’s
going to be very heavy. – No, no, no, not very heavy. I mean you look strong enough. (laughs) – Not for you, yeah. (laughs) Let’s go and have a go. – (speaks in foreign
language) with milking. – (laughs) He’s laughing. Like, yeah right. – Uh-oh (laughing) – It’s nervous. – Yeah it’s nervous. – Not as nervous as I am,
but he’s still nervous. She, she. – Okay, good to go. (speaks in foreign language) – Okay. – Right. – Okay. So, from the top? – Yeah. Going down. (milking) – All right, we’re off. – Yeah. – Oooh, spray. What am I doing? – Yeah, this is going to be a long one. – (laughs) All right. Come on, I’ve got to least … Oh . Nope. It’s not happening out of any other one. – Oh, yeah? Okay, I think that’s good for- – Yeah, I think that’s enough. We’d better let your man get on with it. (loud milk squirting) (laughing) Right I think all nine
cows how now been milked. A small part by me. So we’re ready to now
put the very heavy urn on to the back of the bike. – Okay, you ready? – I think he’s gonna trust me to do it. – Alone? – Well, we’ll see. How heavy is it? – It is quite heavy. – There we go. – You gonna need some help? – I’m trying not to drop it. – Okay, let me help. – Got it? Yeah, then we’re going to
ride to the collection point. Chris is going to ride
this bike, obviously. His potentially 40 litres of milk could fall all over the place
if I’m on the bike. – I think this should be good enough. – Yeah, look’s solid. Right, let’s go. (uplifting music) Before the Buffalo Bike,
this 4 kilometre journey would be done twice daily on foot. So two people, one on
either side of the urn. Once in the morning, and
again in the afternoon. Or sometimes there’d be
three people around two urns when productivity is particularly high. For other farmers, that journey can be four times the distance. It’d be quite a trick
even without the milk. And you can imagine what it’s like to walk with that extra 40 kilogrammes. The bike has cut the journey time by well over 50%. And that makes a huge
difference in time and energy, but also ensures that
the milk stays fresh. (mosquitoes buzzing) Oh, we’ve arrived. We’ll park the bikes up. I’m gonna help Chris stabilise his bike. (man speaks foreign language) (laughing) His friends are laughing at him. At the collection point,
we have to wait our turn to get the milk tested. If it’s all good, it’s then
poured into a large container, at which point Chris
is paid for the amount that he’s brought in. This is the first of two
trips done each and every day. So I think Chris and
I are just about ready to ride back. We’ll just let you know there
are over 100 small farms here in the small province of Palabana. Over here you can see that there are lots of Buffalo Bikes being used. But here’s somebody doubling
up on the back here. Couple of containers. That must have been very
heavy there on the way in. But this is the difference
these Buffalo Bikes have made to the local community. Because they’re all riding
in instead of walking. (Zambians singing) We’re going to leave, briefly,
our journey with Chris, because I wanted to tell
you about this very cool charity and community. This is called Chikumbuso,
and it’s been around since 2005. It was set up to help people in need. So anyone from young
vulnerable people through to orphans, through to widows,
and grandmothers as well. And for the more senior
people that arrive here, they are taught how to
crochet and how to sew, and how to make some
extremely cool products out of recycled materials. I, for example, have literally
just purchased myself possibly the coolest laptop
case you will ever find. For the younger ones, they
have set up an in-house school, which caters and educates children right the way through from
kindergarten to grade seven. However, what they were
finding was, that when they left here and they went
into the senior schools, they were much further
afield and sometimes they weren’t able to get there on foot. And that is why 10 years ago they started working with World Bicycle Relief, in order to provide those
students with the Buffalo Bikes so they could finish what they’d started. Right, we’re back. So I think Chris, – Yeah? – Time to wash the milk can. – Definitely. – One of your workers is going to do that. We do that over here. – We’ll do it just here. – And then Chris has got
lots of work to do today with his poultry section of the farm. – Yeah. – And also, what is the other
thing you have to do today? – The pigeonry we have to run see. – Pigeonry as well? – Yeah. – He wants to go pigeons as you can see. And then we’ll be back to milking
later on, or they will be. Then back down to the … – To taking, delivering milk. – Yeah? – Yeah. – Yeah, long day. – Right, let’s get this off. Now if you’re wondering why Chris’ bike is bright green or bright
yellow, it is because this is part of a special project called the Conservation Agriculture
Scaling Up Project. Which was done in conjunction
with the European Union, Zambian government, and the
Food Agricultural Organisation. They have provided farms
across Zambia with a total of four and half thousand of these special coloured Buffalo Bikes. Chris, I know, is very
grateful to have this because he has used different
bikes in previous years. But the problem was that
with those huge loads of milk on the back, they broke pretty quickly. Whereas this Buffalo
Bike, which is of course built to withstand loads
of up to 100 kilogrammes plus the rider himself,
this is more than capable of doing multiple years
of journeys to and fro with those loads of milk on the back. We only followed Chris for
the first half of his day. It certainly wasn’t easy just doing that. And of course, farming is
a seven day a week job, arduous in these conditions
then, to say the very least. Even with the bike. Now although Chris was
fortunate enough to be donated his bike, and all
students receive theirs free of charge, most farmers will in fact
pay for them over time with a local employee purchase programme. And that is a really important point, the sustainability of World
Bicycle Relief as a charity. And the farmers are
also finding that their Buffalo Bikes are incredibly
useful for another purpose. And that is to bring their
produce down to local markets like this one is Palabana. The donations that you have
already made for the bikes that have been given to
people here in Zambia have already made a huge difference, but we can do so much more for them. We would love to raise
even more money than we did back in 2016 this time around. There is the incentive that
Matt and Cy are going to ride across London on
a 5 kilometre stretch wearing nothing but swimming costume. But apart from that, the
incentive is right here behind me and with
Christopher, who we’ve been following today. So a very big thank you to him, and to all of you who’ve
already made donations. If you’d like to do so
right now you can just go into the description below, follow link, and all of the details will be right there in front of you. If you would like to
see Lizzie, meanwhile, who we follow as a student
on her daily routine, you can find that video just down there.

Jefferson fracture – radiology video tutorial (x-ray, CT)

Jefferson fracture – radiology video tutorial (x-ray, CT)


Hi I’m doctor andrew dixon from radiopaedia.org and in this video we’re going to take a look at the Jefferson fracture which
is a burst type fracture of C1 due to excessive axial loading with
fractures occuring through both the anterior and posterior arches so here is a case from our iPad app of a
twenty-year-old male involved in a motorcycle accident. Here’s his lateral
cervical spine radiograph and we’ll just zoom in to show you some of the abnormalities. You can
see here that the altantodens interval is significantly widened. This should
normally be less than 3mm and you can see out the back this lucent line through the posterior arch representing a fracture. On the PEG view we see that both at the lateral masses of C1 are displaced laterally
relative to the lateral masses of C2 you can see with my laser
pointer that C1 is overhanging C2. This should normally be a straight line like
this, however we can see that both sides have displaced laterally. Now the only way that can happen is if
the arch of C1 is broken in two spots. And we can see here on the CT that is in
fact the case. you can clearly see a fracture through
the posterior arch and a fracture line here through the anterior arch. now the other important thing to note
is this bone fragment here which represents an avulsed fragment from
the insertion of the transverse ligament. this is a rare but important finding in
the setting of Jefferson fracture as it implies instability and explains
why this patient had a widened altantodens distance of the lateral view. so unlike the vast majority of Jefferson’s fractures which can be managed conservatively with immobilization, this
patient may in fact require more definitive surgical management. so there you have it, the Jefferson’s fracture
of C1. you can find out more on our radiopaedia website where there are several other case examples. and this case is featured in our radiopaedia iPad aap which can be found in the App Store.

Factitious Disorder: Why People Fake Serious Illness

Factitious Disorder: Why People Fake Serious Illness


[INTRO] Did you ever fake being sick as a kid? Maybe you were just such a goody-two-shoes
that your parents didn’t think you’d actually lie. Maybe you had it down to a science: run the
thermometer under hot water in the bathroom sink, do some jumping jacks, get hot and sweaty,
and then climb back under the covers and put on your cutest pout. Or maybe you were lucky enough to actually
get your Hogwarts letter and you always kept a Skiving Snackbox or two on hand. If so, I’m super jealous. In any case … why’d you do it? To get out of a test? To avoid that big presentation? Because your parents always made you a giant
ice cream sundae on days when you were feeling lousy? That’s what’s known as malingering: faking
symptoms of illness for some sort of clear material benefit. But for people with factitious disorder, faking
illness isn’t quite so straightforward: they fake symptoms of illness and take on
the role of a sick person, but they do it without obvious external motivation. Historically and in pop culture, it’s usually
called Munchausen syndrome, after a 17th century baron who had a thing for embellishing stories. People with this disorder do all sorts of
things to pull off the ruse: they might lie about their medical history, fake test results,
even cause physical harm to themselves to make it look like they have a disease or condition. They can end up doing things that are pretty
extreme, which is probably why the disorder has shown up in almost every medical drama
on TV. But for the people living with it, the consequences
can be a lot more severe than like a scathing tongue-lashing from Dr. House. In one study that followed 20 people living
with factitious disorder, four of the subjects died because of disorder-related behavior. And even if people with factitious disorder
don’t harm themselves in the process of faking their symptoms, they can still be harmed
by unnecessary medical procedures or find themselves bankrupted by medical bills and
missing work. There’s a variant of this disorder that’s
even worse: people diagnosed with factitious disorder imposed on another fake symptoms
in another person, usually a child or an adult dependent. In those cases, the first step is to protect
the victim, usually by removing them from the care of the person with the disorder. By now, you’re probably wondering why would
anyone go to such lengths to seem sick. Well, psychologists have wondered that, too. It’s worth noting that most of the research
on factitious disorder comes from case studies. It’s hard to find subjects for an empirical
study, because if patients won’t admit they’re faking — and most of them won’t — the
only way to really prove it is with their medical records. And that violates patient confidentiality. Still, a lot of cases have been documented,
and the consensus among researchers is that the goal is to assume what they call a “sick
role.” Think about the last time you were sick. How did your friends and family treat you? I’m sure feeling sick wasn’t fun, but
the way other people treated you was probably kinda nice. We have different social expectations for
people who are ill. They’re often given more attention and sympathy,
and other people try to help them out. That treatment is what people with factitious
disorder seem to crave. People with the disorder are also generally
experiencing psychological distress, and faking physical symptoms can be a way to get attention
and care. But even though faking the symptoms might
be conscious, the motivation behind it and that psychological distress are usually unconscious. Case studies show that a lot of people with
factitious disorder experienced childhood trauma, illness, loss, or neglect. It is possible to treat factitious disorder. Seeing a therapist to talk about the underlying
distress can help. The biggest problem is diagnosing the disorder
in the first place. It’s a tricky balance: obviously doctors
don’t want to perform risky procedures on people who don’t need them … but they
also don’t want to withhold them from people who do. There are clues to watch out for, though. For example, people with factitious disorder
often have hopped from doctor to doctor. They tend to be pretty calm about scary symptoms,
and they’re willing to undergo some serious procedures. And a lot of the time, all those tests and
procedures … just don’t do much to help. Of course, there are also people who fit that
description who are not faking. So, it’s complicated. Even once it’s clear that they have factitious
disorder, confronting patients doesn’t always work. Studies have shown that only 15-20% of people
with factitious disorder will admit that they’re faking. Most of them just go find another doctor. The best approach seems to be to offer an
alternative that will encourage the patient to seek psychological help without having
to admit that they faked their symptoms. They’re told that while the doctors work
on their condition, a psychologist might also help them get better. That way, their therapist can work with them
on understanding the underlying distress that caused them to seek the “sick role” in
the first place. And hopefully, eventually, they will stop
needing to fake it. Thanks for watching this episode of SciShow
Psych, and thanks to our patrons on Patreon for helping us make this show. To learn more, and get cool rewards like access
to a monthly livestream with the crew, you can go to patreon.com/scishow. And don’t forget to go to youtube.com/scishowpsych
and subscribe!

Video Brings Visibility to Invisible Disabilities and Invisible Illness!

Video Brings Visibility to Invisible Disabilities and Invisible Illness!


(Natalie Tysdale) Have you watched someone parking in an accessible spot but they’re not using a wheelchair? Have you wondered if they really have a disability? Has someone ever shared with you about their illness or disability and you can’t see the symptoms and you might think or actually say to them “you don’t look sick?” Well these situations and many others like them often end in disbelief, prejudice, isolation and loneliness. Wayne and Sherri Connell founded the Invisible Disabilities Association for these very reasons over twenty years ago. they wanted to provide education, encouragement and connection to the millions who are touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. IDA is treating the deeper roots of problems in society not just specific diseases but the perceptions and misconceptions and deep-seated notions of what it means to live daily with an invisible disability or to care for someone who does. Everyone has a story a friend, a family member, a co-worker, maybe even yourself? Here are some of their stories. (Sherri Connell) I had great plans for my life. I was extremely active goal oriented person. I was just always on the go and none of those plans included being sick. I was also having bouts with paralysis and they didn’t know why then at 27 years old all of the sudden one side went totally paralyzed the next thing I know I was paralyzed from the ribs down. Eventually after being in the hospital for a week, they diagnosed me with multiple sclerosis. The world changed I was in an auto accident and the accident. I was unconscious. I was injured and my memory was fading away. I discovered that I had a brain injury as a result of the accident. (Pete Ohlin) [piano music] Initially I was interested in Invisible Disabilities because I believe my music could help others they’re struggling with an invisible disabilities and then about four years ago my daughter was diagnosed with a with a rare heart condition which would be considered an invisible disability. [Piano Music] (Cassandra Perkins) I was born blind in my left eye and you can’t tell because it’s hemi-blindness people get angry people would make fun of me and you know you don’t think that it gets to you but then it starts to get to you. I can’t even take care of my daily needs I can barely get a shower or wash my hair. It takes takes me days to wash my hair and get it combed out. No one can imagine living alone with a brain injury. You don’t know if the dishes are done you don’t know if you’re taking a bath you don’t know how to dress you don’t know, you don’t know because you don’t remember if you know me, you see me you don’t think that I have this thing going in my head that I’m constantly battling. And the hardest part is people didn’t get it. People would say, “but you look fine.” “What’s the problem?” People need to see it to believe it! and that is the hardest part. And I was this happy, positive, outgoing, life loving kid and then everyday being told that “I’m fat” that “I’m emo” that “I’m goth” that “I’m ugly” it gets in your head it really starts to get to you and I would go to my mirror every day in my room and slowly this person this Cassandra Perkins that I love just disappeared. One of the most insensitive things I think that I got from a principal and also a teacher was that your daughter “looks fine” “she looks great” and I get it from people on Facebook to which in my head I’m replying like “yeah right you can you can see that the blood is pooling in her legs and that her heart isn’t working correct right?” [Laughing] One day I realized I have an invisible disability! It’s invisible! People can’t see it! And I was so excited because it just completely wrapped around the description of what I was going through. I think if we give people a platform and give people a safe place to talk about these things they’re gonna be more willing to open up and know that they can make connections. I have someplace to go some people to talk to when I’m starting to get frustrated or I had a bad day I can pick up a phone and call that’s very important because up until recently I was by myself. There’s days where people feel really good, there’s days where people feel really bad, but they know that they can come to this social media platform and be able to connect through that. [Background Music] And the Invisible Disabilities Association shows people the mountain so that they can see our perseverance and how hard we fight. I feel supported and I feel like I have an organization that’s fighting for me! Here’s why I love Invisible Disabilities because there’s so many aspects of the spectrum there’s helping the caregiver there’s helping the person who’s going through it as well as helping people who are just outside family or friends how to help that person how to say the right things what to do. So what I drool? So what my clothes don’t match? It’s my disability, get over it! I’m here and I’m not going to go away, I’m not gonna hide anymore, I’m here! [Background Music] (Wayne Connell) Wow, those stories were amazing and many of you have a story maybe it’s a story of illness and pain but really what it is is a story of people not believing you and we want to believe you we want to understand that just because we can’t see the illness or the pain that doesn’t mean it’s not real so it Invisible Disabilities we believe you, we want to acknowledge the difficulties you’re going through because we know you’re the expert who’s living with the illness and pain and disability. We want to be your voice and we want you to join us in that. We want you to join us in sharing those stories and we want you to be that voice as well along with us. So please go to InvisibleNoMore.com that’s InvisibleNoMore.com Because let’s together envision a world where people living with illness, pain and disability will be Invisible No More!

PHILOSOPHY – David Hume

PHILOSOPHY – David Hume


The 18th century writer, David Hume, is one of the world’s great philosophical voices because he hit upon a key fact about human nature- that we are more influenced by our feelings than by reason. This is, at one level, possibly a great insult to our self image, but Hume thought that if we could learn to deal well with this surprising fact, we could be both individually and collectively a great deal calmer and happier than if we denied it. Hume was born in Edinburgh in 1711, to a family that was long established but far from rich. He was the second son and it was clear early on that he would need to find a job eventually, but nothing seemed to suit him. He tried law, the vocation of his father and his older brother, but soon decided that it was: “a laborious profession, requiring the drudgery of a whole life.” He was considered for academic posts at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow, but he didn’t land either job. So, he set out to become a public intellectual, someone who would make his money selling books to the general public. It was pretty hard-going. His first book, ‘A Treatise of Human Nature’, for which he had the highest hopes, met with a dismal reception. “Never literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise”, he wrote. “It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction as to even excite a murmur along the zealots.” But Hume kept at it, realising that the blame largely lay with the way that he had expressed his ideas. And doggedly training himself to write in a more accessible and popular manner, eventually, he did find an audience. his later works: popular history books and collections of elegant essays were best-sellers of the day. As he would say, not without some pride: “The money given me by booksellers much exceeded anything formerly known in England; I was to become not only independent but opulent.” Humes philosophy is built around a single powerful observation: that the key thing we need to get right in life is feeling rather than rationality. It sounds like an odd conclusion. Normally we assume that what we need to do is train our minds to be as rational as possible, to be devoted to evidence and logical reasoning and committed to preventing our feelings from getting in the way. But Hume insisted that whatever we may aim for – reason is the slave of passion. We are more motivated by our feelings than by any of the comparatively feeble results of analysis and logic. Few of our leading convictions had driven by rational investigations of the facts. We decide whether someone is admirable, what to do with our spare time, what constitutes a successful career, or who to love on the basis of feeling above anything else. Reason helps a little, but the decisive factors are bound up with our emotional lives, with our passions, as Hume calls them. Hume lived in a time known as the Age of Reason, when many claimed that the glory of human beings consists in their rationality, but for Hume a human is just another kind of animal. Hume was deeply attentive to the curious way that we very often reason from not to our convictions. We find an idea nice or threatening and on that basis alone declare it true or false. Reason only comes in later to support the original attitude. What Hume didn’t believe however was that all feelings are acceptable and equal. that’s why he firmly believed in the education of the passions. People have to learn to be more benevolent, more patient, more at ease with themselves and less afraid of others. But to be taught these things they need an education system that addresses feelings rather than reason. This is why Hume so deeply believed in the role and significance of public intellectuals. These were people who (unlike university professors that Hume grew to dislike immensely) had to excite a passion-based attachment to ideas, wisdom and insight. Only if they succeeded would they have the money to eat. It was for this reason that they had to write well, use colorful examples and have recoursed wit and charm. Hume’s insight is that if you want to change people’s beliefs reasoning with them like a normal philosophy professor won’t be the most effective strategy. He’s pointing out that we have to try to adjust sentiments by sympathy, re-assurance, good example, encouragement and what he called “art”. And only later, for a few determined souls, should we ever try to make a case on the basis of facts and logic. A key place where Hume made use of the idea of the priority of feeling over reason was in connection with religion Hume didn’t think it was rational to believe in god. That is – he didn’t think there were compelling logical arguments in favor of the existence of a deity. He himself seems to have floated between mild agnosticism (there might be a god, I’m not sure) and mild theism (there is a god, but it doesn’t make much difference to me that there is). However the idea of a vindictive god, someone ready to punish people in an afterlife for not believing in him in this one, this he considered a cruel superstition. Hume’s central point is that religious belief isn’t the product of reason. So arguing for or against it on the basis of facts doesn’t touch the core issue. To try to persuade someone to believe or not believe with well-honed arguments seemed particularly daft to Hume. This is why he was a foremost defender of the concept of religious toleration. We shouldn’t treat those who disagree with us over religion as rational people who’ve made an error of reasoning and so need to be put right, but rather as passionate emotion-driven creatures who should be left in peace so long as they do likewise with us. Trying to have a rational argument over religion was for Hume the height of folly and arrogance. Hume was what is technically known as a skeptic someone committed to doubting a lot of the common sense ideas of the day. One of the things he doubted was the concept of what is technically called “personal identity”. The idea that we have that we can understand ourselves and have a more or less graspable and enduring identity that runs through life. Hume pointed out that there is no such thing as a ” Core Self ” “When I enter most intimately into what I call “myself”,” he famously explained, “I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch “myself” at any time without a perception and can never observe anything but the perception. Hume concluded that we aren’t really the neat definable people reason tells us that we are and that we seem to be when we look at ourselves in the mirror or casually use that grand and rather misleading word ” I “. Yet, despite being skeptical of temper Hume was very happy for us to hold onto most of our common-sense beliefs because they are what help us make our way in the world Trying to be rational about everything is a special kind of madness. Hume was making a slight dig at Descartes. The French philosopher had died 60 years before Hume was born. But his intellectual influence was still very much alive. He had argued that we should throw out every fruit of the mind that wasn’t perfectly rational. But Hume proposed that hardly anything we do is ever truly rational And yet he ventured that most beliefs are justified simply because they work They’re useful to us. They help us to get on with what we want to do. A test of a belief isn’t its provable truth but its utility Hume was offering a corrective which we sometimes badly need to our fascination with prestigious but not actually very important logical conundrums In opposition to academic niceties he was a skeptical philosopher who stood for common sense Championing the everyday and the wisdom of the unlearned and the ordinary. Hume took a great interest in the traditional philosophical topic of Ethics A conundrum of how humans can be good. He argued that morality isn’t about having moral ideas It’s about having been trained from an early age in the art of decency through the emotions Being good means getting into good habits of feeling. Hume was a great advocate of qualities like wit, good manners and sympathy because these are the things make people nice to be around outside of any rational plan to be good. He was hugely struck by the fact that a person and here again, he was thinking of Descartes could be ostensibly rational and yet, not that nice. Because being able to follow complex argument or deduce trends from data doesn’t make you sensitive to the sufferings of others or skilled at keeping your temper. These qualities are the work of our feelings So, if we want people to behave well, what we need to do is to rethink education We have to influence the development of feeling We have to encourage benevolence, gentleness, pity and shame through the seduction of the passionate sides of our nature, without delivering dry, logical lectures. Hume’s philosophy always emerged as an attempt to answer a personal question. What is a good life? He wanted to know how his own character and that of those around him could be influenced for the best. And oddly, for a philosopher, he didn’t feel the traditional practice of Philosophy could really help. Though he was scholarly, he was in large part, a man of the world. For some years, he was an adviser to the British ambassador in Paris who welcomed his shrewd wisdom. He was much liked by those around him, known by the French as ‘Le Bon David’, a humane, kind and witty conversationalist, much in demand as a dinner companion. he insisted. That’s the way Hume lived. Not in the intellectual seclusion of a monastery or ivory tower, But deeply embedded in the company of other humans, dining. He especially liked roast chicken, chatting about love and career and playing Backgammon. Hume died in Edinburgh in August 1776, at home, in his house in St. Andrew’s Square His doctor wrote about the last hours to Adam Smith, for many years, Hume’s best friend. Hume remains a rather outstanding thing. A philosopher, alive to how much Philosophy can has to learn from common-sense.