Helping the Nation Save Lives Since 1877 – St John Ambulance

Helping the Nation Save Lives Since 1877 – St John Ambulance


[Song] Place your baby on a nice flat surface, and tilt
their head back – don’t be nervous! [Man’s voice] Wasn’t Steve supposed to be sorting out on Friday? [Football commentator] He’s milking the moment! Just goes to show – you don’t have to be a footballer… [Princess] Then, one gives up to five back blows [Trainer] … under one year old is choking, you’ll notice that they’ll be unable to cry, cough or breathe [Voiceover on historical clips]…the next part of the journey. There will be that
touch of a loving hand, the look that speaks more than a play full of words. When you’re fit enough to be flown back to a home hospital
you begin to… … the one-man ambulance which the St John’s man is
driving, but it’s so comfortable that I’ll be more than one man… [Child’s voice] My mummy, she fell off a chair and she’s moving, and she’s not even getting up… [Man] I just grabbed her and carried out five initial rescue breaths in the hallway. The paramedic popped his head round the back of the ambulance and shouted ‘Well done, she’s alive!’ I couldn’t believe it, I’d saved her. [Woman’s voice] I think it’s very important that
children learn first aid because if they didn’t people like Billy wouldn’t save
people’s lives. If Bill hadn’t been to St John Ambulance, I would be alive today.

Ambulance Video for Children | Truck Tunes for Kids | Twenty Trucks Channel | Fire and Rescue


The ambulance is racing
She’s speeding to the scene Her sirens blare, her lights go flash
And this is what they mean: Watch out! An ambulance is coming
Watch out! An ambulance is coming When someone is in trouble
They dial 9-1-1 She gets the call, and moves along,
Cause now she’s on the run She’s loaded up with equipment
To help somebody out She’s got the stuff to fix you up,
She knows the fastest route! Move, move outta her way
So she can get there fast It’s an emergency
And she has gotta get past Watch out! An ambulance is coming
Watch out! An ambulance is coming The person she is helping
Is loaded up in back The doors get closed and off they go
To the hospital, just like that If someone’s in a position
With an urgent condition Where there’s not a physician
She can do great things Yeah, she is not a magician, no
But helping people’s her mission She has got an Emergency
Medical Technician Move, move outta her way
So she can get there fast It’s an emergency
And she has gotta get past Move, move outta her way
So she can get there fast It’s an emergency
And she has gotta get past Watch out! An ambulance is coming
Watch out! An ambulance is coming

First Aid for a Choking Baby

First Aid for a Choking Baby


– Choking baby. If your baby appears to be choking, the first signs you might
see are them being very red, very quiet, and struggling to breathe. Initially, they’re red, if they start to turn blue, they are most definitely choking. What you need to do is, very quickly, get them out of the highchair
if that’s where they are, get them onto your lap, have
a quick look in their mouth and see if there is anything obvious. If there is anything
obvious, you would just remove it with your finger and thumb. Do not be tempted to finger
sweep or poke your fingers down in any way because you
could make things worse. Then what you need to do is
support them on their chin with your finger and thumb, turn them over across your hand and your arm, support them and put them
down your leg like that, with the head lower than the body. And then you’re going to hit them hard between the shoulder blades, and check. And check, nice and
calm, the calmer you are, the calmer they will be. And you will do that up to five times, if the obstruction hasn’t come out. If the first five back
blows haven’t worked, get an ambulance on the way. If it hasn’t come out after five times, your second line treatment for a baby, is a chest thrust. When we covered the choking child, you would’ve seen that we
did an abdominal thrust. You would never do an abdominal thrust on a baby under a year, because
you would do serious damage. So for the baby, you’re
holding them like this, supporting them carefully, two
fingers between the nipples, centre of the chest, same
place as you would be pressing if you were doing CPR. And you would push down,
in and up towards the head to dislodge any obstruction. So, one, and check. And you do that up to five times again. So up to five times of that. And then back to, the back blows, and check each time. Five of those, five of those. Five of those, keep going. If the baby starts to lose consciousness, then you need to start CPR straight away. And at any point, that
obstruction could be dislodged, you keep going and you get
an ambulance on the way fast.

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : Anaphylaxis Home First Aid

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : Anaphylaxis Home First Aid


We are going to cover some of the treatment
that you can do at home before medical personnel arrives or if you don’t have access to medical
personnel. If for instance you are out in the wilderness and don’t have access to medical
personnel we are going to cover a few things you can do to prevent the spread of anaphylaxis.
Now the first step you are going to take in treating anaphylaxis is you want to find out
what is causing this reaction and remove it from the person. If it is a bee sting, you
want to try and get the stinger out. If it something that they ate you want to make sure
that, they don’t eat anymore of it. If it is something that they are breathing, you
want to try and remove them from that atmosphere. If you have an allergic reaction yourself
be very cautious, as to how you treat this person. You are not going to want to jeopardize
your own safety to help this person. Because if you end up having an allergic reaction
at the same thing it is not going to be doing either of you any good. So the first step
is to remove the substance that is causing the reaction. Identify the substance and remove
it. Another treatment that you can do at home is to give Benadryl or an antihistamine tablet.
This will keep the reaction from getting any worse. It does not stop what has already occurred
but it stops the histamine release and keep it from getting any worse. Another medication
that can be give at home is that if the person experiencing the reaction has been given an
inhaler with Albuterol in it. That’s something that can help with the breathing. So if they
start having difficulty breathing they have been prescribed and inhaler. You can use this
inhaler. It’s not recommended that you use someone else’s inhaler. So it is only recommended
to use if it has been prescribed to the person having the reaction.

First Aid for CHOKING – How to Help Your Child in an Emergency

First Aid for CHOKING – How to Help Your Child in an Emergency


– Hello, I’m Emma Hammett
from First Aid for Life and onlinefirstaid.com. Today I’m going to talk to
you about how to help a child or a baby or an adult, for
that matter, who has choked and also what to do and how to avoid them strangling themselves which is sadly all too common. So first of all, if you have
somebody that is choking, if they are fully choking so
that their airway’s blocked, they will not be able to make any sound. So they will be quiet. If they are coughing and spluttering and if it’s a baby that’s gagging, then please let them cough and splutter, and gagging is a great
thing that we’re able to do that expels the food
from above the windpipe and actually stops you
choking in the first place. So if that is happening,
encourage them to do so. If they are completely silent and looking incredibly distressed and struggling to breathe, then if it’s a very small child or a baby, have a little look in their mouth and see if there’s something obvious. Don’t finger sweep or poke down. You’ll make things worse, but finger and thumb,
just pop in, have a look, and see if there is something
obvious that you can remove. If you can, remove it with
your finger and thumb. Things like burst balloons. They are horrible to choke on, and they’re much harder to actually expel because they’re long and they get stuck. So if that hasn’t helped,
then what you need to do is put your hand on their
chest, lean them down, if you can imagine that
they’re actually on my lap, if I do it on my lap,
you won’t be able to see, and hit them between the shoulder blades hard, (banging loudly) firmly, and check each time to
see if it’s come out. So (banging loudly) up to
five times hard on the back. See if it comes out in one
or two bangs on the back, then don’t keep going, but you’re supporting them on the chest. So if it’s an adult, you
would lean them forward and support them on their chest like that, and obviously if it’s a child, you can put them across your lap. If it is a baby, you can put them, support their head under there, support their chin, put
them across your arm, and down your leg, so sitting down. On my website and on my YouTube channel, I’ve got much better videos
actually showing you clearly what to do with a baby
or child that is choking. So you put them down and firm back blows, checking each time. If it hasn’t come out on
those first five back blows, get an ambulance on the way, and for an adult or a
child over the age of one, what you would then do is make a fist and put that fist between
under your ribcage and your tummy button, so in here, and pull in and up in a
J-shaped movement, so in and up, and that is expelling
whatever’s stuck like bellows and getting it out that way. So if the first five back
blows haven’t worked, get an ambulance on the way and then you’re doing five or up to five of those abdominal thrusts. Used to be called the Heimlich manoeuvre. If that hasn’t worked, you’re
back to the back blows, then back to the abdominal thrusts. You keep going. If they start to lose consciousness, you need to be ready to do CPR. Now for a baby, you don’t
do abdominal thrusts because it would do serious damage. For a baby, you do two fingers between the nipples in an upward thrust. Again, I can’t be
showing you this properly on a Facebook live. I’ve got proper details
on my YouTube channel on the choking baby video and
on my website on the blog, but you’re doing an
upward thrust like that with two fingers. You can hear it, nice and firm. Up to five of those and
then back over again. You’re then doing the five back blows, supporting them properly all the time. So if they lose consciousness,
you start to do CPR. Now really important in
terms of strangulation, please, please be
careful with blind cords. Blind cords are dangerous, and even if you think
they’re out of reach, children can climb. So be very careful not to put plant pots and chairs and cots
underneath curtains or blinds that have the dangly down blind cords. Get proper clips. Even better, get blinds
that haven’t got the cords, and just be careful. In addition, don’t hang
things on the edge of cots. So people often hang bags on the end, or they have the nice looped cot bumpers. Again, they can strangle
themselves in that, so be careful. If you do find a child that
has strangled themselves, remove what is ’round their
neck as quickly as you can. You might need to use scissors
to do that very carefully, and be ready to resuscitate and get emergency help
as quickly as you can. I hope that’s been useful. That’s Emma Hammett
from First Aid for Life and onlinefirstaid.com.

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : Anaphylaxis Emergency First Aid

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : Anaphylaxis Emergency First Aid


Here’s an example of an anaphylactic reaction
and the correct treatment that should occur. Here a young male who’s just got stung by
a bee. First thing he does is he notices that it’s obvious it’s a bee sting. First thing
he wants to do is remove himself from the area to make sure he doesn’t get stung again
and then he removes the stinger from his arm. Now, after getting stung by the bee, he begins
to notice that some hives develop on his arm. He also has some redness and swelling. Not
long after, he begins to cough. He has a little bit of tightness in his throat and is heart
rate is elevated. He also begins to feel a little bit dizzy. He also begins to feel a
little bit nauseous and slightly confused. He also begins to feel some diarrhea. Now,
the first thing he wants to do, is he realizes this could be an anaphylactic reaction so
he immediately has a friend call 911 for him. Once emergency medical personnel is notified,
the treatment he considers is he takes a couple of Benadryl that his friend has laying around
the house. If he had access to an Epipen he could give that. If he had an inhaler, he
could use that. And if he had oxygen at home, he could also do that. Now, while he’s waiting
for medical personnel to arrive, he also makes a list of any allergies he knows he has. Gives
a list of any medications he’s currently taking and also writes out any history of health
problems that he’s had in the past.

Ultrasound for bone fractures

Ultrasound for bone fractures


Hi, Today we will talk about the use of ultrasonography in bone fractures I am Mehmet Ali Aslaner, Emergency Medicine Specialist. Love from Cappadocia. Since children and pregnant women are considered radiation sensitive groups, minimum exposure is important for these patients Ultrasonograhy easily can be used instead of X-ray for the diagnosis of fracture If an X-ray was taken and fracture diagnosis still is not clear, It can be used to confirm the diagnosis It is also a very convenient method to evaluate the success of the reduction and environmental aspects. Linear probe is the most commonly used probe in musculoskeletal system Convex probe can also be used according to the condition of the patient In recognition of bony structures, it is enought to recognize the cortex If you can not see anything behind the well-constructed hyperechoic line, you can call it “bone cortex” You need to follow the cortex line to detect fracture Any deterioration and stepping should lead us to a suspected fracture Nasal scans should be performed on top as well as both sides You are more likely to catch lateral fissure fractures that you can skip. Although the fracture diagnosis is sometimes obvious, it is important that the fracture damage which tissues For example, a clavicle fracture may cause artery or ven injury Although the hematoma area is seen around the fracture in this patient, the artery-vein structures appear stable at a certain distance from the fracture Especially protecting the pediatric patient group from radiation has been the subject of study for many physicians Wrist fractures can easily be recognized with the US Recognition of sono anatomy is necessary for accurate diagnosis In this image, radius fracture is seen In case of suspected broken wrist, both Radius and Ulna should be scanned in 3 directions Fractures are most commonly found on dorsal scans In this image, the fractured line is not clearly seen on the volar and lateral scans, whereas the dorsal scan shows cortex irregularity. Epiphysis can be confusing, especially in childhood An epiphyseal line is seen in the view after the broken line. If you can not distinguish between a fracture and an epiphyseal line, the easiest way to do it is to view the other limb of the patient. The age-specific graphs for the epiphysis line are shown here The epiphyseal line is not observed after 18 years of age. US can be used for elbow fractures with 98% sensitivity and 70% specificity , and reduced unnecessary graph request by %48 The use of US in radial fractures reduces recurrent reduction rates and decreases surgical rates. Ankle, more complex than wrist, is easily scanned by US in isolated trauma. To summarize; Ultrasound reduces unnecessary radiological imaging rates and reduces reduction rates in fractures. Contact me for your questions and contributions Thank you.

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : General Allergic Reactions

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : General Allergic Reactions


Allergic reaction is nothing more than your
bodies? response to a foreign substance, this called an allergen. Allergic reaction can
be caused by any number of things. Basically, anything can cause an allergic reaction. Some
examples that I have on screen here are the four different ways that you can be exposed
to allergic reaction. One of them over here is skin contact through a plant, through animal,
through pollen or through latex are all ways the common allergic reactions happen. Another
way is through injection either through a needle at a hospital setting or through a
bee sting or any type of insect bite can also trigger an allergic reaction. If you ingest
something such as food, medication, nuts and shells are very common. Several people have
shell allergies and also to peanuts. Another one is through inhalation through pollen,
dust, mold mildew and animals. I am sure everybody has someone that they know that has an allergic
reaction of some sort and this is just overview of some of the things that can cause it.

How to PACK a WOUND | Bitesize First Aid

How to PACK a WOUND | Bitesize First Aid


– Catastrophic bleeding
and how to pack a wound. So many of us have heard of tourniquets and how you can stop bleeding on limbs by actually occluding or
blocking the blood supply below the wound. Or what if it’s more of a blast and you
can’t get to the source of the bleeding? Maybe it’s on the side of you and it’s not suitable for a tourniquet. So another way to stop
bleeding in this sort of wound is to actually pack the wound. Now what you are doing
when you’re doing this is, please wear gloves, so with your gloved hand, you are putting your finger
into the source of the bleeding. So you’re actually stopping
where the blood is coming out. You are then getting something to pack that wound. Now the military and the
NHS use things like Cellux or trauma gauze, which has a clotting agent on it. And that will increase the clotting and allow the wound to clot far quicker than you packing a wound. However, packing a wound
with an improvised dressing is still incredibly powerful. You can save somebody’s life with a sock. How about that? And what you would do is find
the source of the bleeding with your finger, so a gloved finger, gloved hand, and you get something like this, so this is just a triangular
bandage or it could be a sock or it could be a bit of
cotton shirt or whatever, and what you are doing is
literally putting that in and then bit by bit, you are lifting up and pushing down on top of this packing so that you are packing that wound in all the different areas, so that as you are packing it, which you would do relatively quickly, you are then filling the
wound with this material so that when you are now pushing down, you are applying pressure
directly to the source of the wound, because you have filled it. So you would put it in like this. You would apply pressure on top, ideally with a dressing or, if you have access to one of
these great blast dressing type of things, you can do a really good
compression over the top where you will put this
in and you can use this with this natty, little gadget to get it on as tight as you possibly can. ‘Cause you will need the pressure to stop the bleeding coming through. So you would put this on, you twist it, this one, as you go round, but you would put this on tightly and you would get emergency
help as quickly as possible. Look for signs of shock. If they’ve got a catastrophic bleed, they will be showing signs of shock. Keep them warm, keep them dry. Elevate the legs if at all possible. And this is an emergency, get help fast. (gentle music)