First Aid for Fireworks injuries and staying safe around fireworks

First Aid for Fireworks injuries and staying safe around fireworks


– Hello, I’m Emma Hammett
from First Aid for Life and onlinefirstaid.com. It’s fireworks time. When autumn hits, we start
getting into Halloween, fireworks, Bonfire Night, Diwali, building up to New Year’s Eve. Fireworks start landing in the shops, and there is an increase
in antisocial behaviour associated with them, but more importantly, there
is also a serious increase in the number of injuries and
people admitted to hospital or turning up in A&E needing treatment for firework related injuries. In fact, there were
four and a half thousand people needing treatment last year. And that includes nearly
five hundred children that required treatment following
injuries with sparklers. Now a lot of people think that
sparklers are safe fireworks. Sparklers get as hot as a blowtorch, and we give them to small kids, and we say here, wave them around. So they need to be supervised seriously. They can have fun with
them, but be sensible. We’ve written a blog that
clearly takes you through some sensible precautions to minimise the risk from injuries with fireworks. And also, it gives you first
aid tips if somebody’s burned, if they end up with sparks in their eye, if they have smoke inhalation, or any of the other
relatively common injuries that happen around this year. So important things, if you’re
having a display at home, make sure that you’ve got a first aid kit and you know how to use it. You’ve got sand and you’ve got saline, which you can use to irrigate if somebody’s got something in their eye. Make sure you’ve also got
access to copious amounts of cool running water in
case somebody’s burned. There are all sorts of tips
that we have heard about and rules about fireworks
and the fireworks code. Please don’t store
fireworks in your pocket. Please don’t set them
off with a naked flame. Use a taper, and that obviously is a naked flame, but with a longer taper
rather than a lighter, which is obviously very short. Think very carefully. You’re setting off explosives. So stand well back, make sure the person posting the display and
setting off the fireworks is not consuming alcohol, because they need to have
their wits about them. Make sure that the fireworks have got the British Safety Standard, and that they are big enough, or rather, your garden is big enough, to house the fireworks that you’re buying, and they haven’t got too many
overhanging trees and things that could pose a risk. Ensure that people watching the fireworks are well back. Ideally, if they’ve got windows like this, they would be inside and the fireworks would be let off outside
so that they can see them from a safe distance
and from behind glass, where they’re safe. With sparklers, don’t
give them to under fives. And make sure that
children are wearing gloves when they’re holding sparklers. Have some sand for them to
put the spent sparklers out in because hot sparklers will
remain hot for a long time. If they pick them up,
they will burn themselves, and it will be a serious burn. With any burns, run the area
under cool running water for a full twenty minutes. Now we’ve got another blog
all about how to reduce the affects of a burn, to minimise the amount of
scarring and tissue damage and actually speed up the recovery, so the best treatment for a burn. If there’s sparks in the eyes and things, irrigate ideally with your sterile saline or with running water. If there’s anything embedded in the eye, you need to get them to an eye hospital as quickly as possible. Have a read of our blogs. I’m going to link them below. This Facebook Live. Stay safe at those firework display, and please don’t be one
of those statistics. So, fireworks are fun, I love them, but be safe and sensible, and also don’t forget the
impact they have on our pets. Pets are petrified. They have no idea what time of year it is and what to expect. That’s Emma Hammett
from First Aid for Life, and onlinefirstaid.com.

Eye Injuries

Eye Injuries


Now let’s cover the topic of eye injuries,
of which there can be a couple of main types. One is an object embedded in the eye. The
other is a chemical in the eye. In this case, we’re going to be first addressing the object
in the eye. In this case we know that the worker was by a grinding wheel, and potentially
one of the brushes may have flown off the wheel and embedded in their eye. They’re in
a great deal of pain. We’ve gone ahead and assessed for scene safety, our gloves are
on, and also the patient is not suffering from airway, breathing, or circulation problems
at this time, so they’re remaining fairly stable. We guided them to a place where they
could be sat down carefully and now treated, and here’s what we’re going to do. We find
a cup. It’s important to understand that we want to actually get something that goes over
the wounded eye so that we don’t put any pressure on the object that’s embedded in the eye.
The second thing too is, if you have a medical grade cup, that’s fine, but you could also
use a Dixie cup or a drinking cup, a styrofoam cup, a coffee cup. It really doesn’t matter.
It doesn’t have to be overly large, because that’s going to cause some problems in trying
to bandage around it, so the smaller, the better. But we do want it to be at least deep
enough that it keeps the pressure off from that eye. The second point to make is that
we want to bandage both eyes shut because eyes tend to move together. So if we leave
one eye unbandaged so the person can see, when they move that eye they will also be
moving the affected eye, and we don’t want to cause further harm. The third point, and
lastly, we can have the patient assist us, when we’re having them hold the cup or hold
things in place while we bandage. So here we are. I’m just going to go ahead and put
this cup over your affected eye, ma’am. Go ahead and take your hand away. Now can you
hold that cup in place? Now the second thing I’m going to do– and be sure to talk to your
patient. They’re kind of blind at this point, so you want to be really communicating with
them, instead of making them guess what they’re feeling, like, “Now I’m putting a cup on your
eye, and now I’m going to throw a bandage on your eye.” Explain what you’re going to
do before you do it, so we don’t shock them. And then the other thing to remember too is,
once this is all bandaged, they’re blind. We’re going to have to lead them as if they
are blind, making sure to remind them where to step, how to step, so they don’t fall down.
And ideally we’re going to transport this patient via EMS, because there’s things that
we can do en route that might not be able to be done in a private car. But if the EMS
is not an option, private car may work as long as the patient is stable and doesn’t
have any other injuries that would stop them from being transported. So I took another
4×4 gauze. If you had an actual eye bandage, you could use that, certainly, but a 4×4 gauze
is not a problem either. Ma’am, I’m going to put this over your non-affected eye, and
you can hold that in place, and I’m just going to wrap a gauze around both of them. Go ahead
and let go of the cup side. I’m going to put a bandage around. Let me know if that hurts
at all, okay? Not the eye that’s hurt, but I mean, as I’m wrapping, any new pain. Now
I’m going to go ahead and wrap around this. You can let go. And I’m just going to continue
here. I know that’s over your nose, but I’ll move that in just a second, okay? I’m going
to continue to bandage around, and probably just a good couple times. You just want to
make sure that the cup is not going to slip. And then once you come back around to the
other side, we tuck the excess in underneath the bandage, as long as it’s not putting too
much pressure. Or you could always tape it in place. Is that fairly comfortable, ma’am?
I’m going to go ahead and lift this over your nose so you can breathe okay. Now the patient
is packaged and ready to go. Now we’re going to be doing our secondary survey, which is
doing a double-check. This is a pretty distracting injury, so it could take our eyes, our eyes
as rescuers, off from other things that might be happening. Maybe she fell after she got
the injury in the eye and hit her head. So we’re always going to be assessing for level
of consciousness, airway, breathing, circulation, signs of shock, and treating accordingly,
as we get this person into definitive care and back on track. And now let’s take a look
at the other type of eye injury, which is chemical burns. Whether a dry chemical or
a liquid chemical, it can cause a great amount of damage to this eye and the mucous membrane
of the eye in a relatively short amount of time. So getting the person to a position
where we can actually start to dilute the chemical as soon as possible is essential.
Now we would like to use a balanced solution as far as pH goes, but if you only have the
tap water out of a sink, or you have bottled water, drinking water, anything is going to
be better than nothing. If it’s a dry chemical, we’re going to brush as much of the excess
off as we can before we begin to dilute it and flush the eye. If it’s a liquid, we’re
just going to begin flushing. A key point here: If it’s one affected eye, we want to
go from the inside of the eye and rinse to the outside. We don’t want to cross-contaminate
eyeballs. We don’t want to flush from outside in, as it can then run over the bridge of
the nose into the non-affected eye. Now we’ve got chemical exposure to both eyes. Remember
that we’re going to flush for no less than 20 minutes to dilute and to bring the solution
into a position where it’s not causing damage. We’re going to transport this person to an
emergency room as soon as possible, and we’re going to watch for other life-threatening
issues. Remember, the chemical that went in the eye could have also gotten into the mouth,
nose, or airway, so we don’t want to take for granted that this is an isolated injury.
So we’re going to continue to assess our patient from head to toe, looking for life-threatening
situations like airway, breathing, circulation, or shock symptoms, and treat accordingly,
and then continue to flush those eyeballs out so that we can get the chemical out and
stop the burning from happening.

Eye Injuries – First Aid

Eye Injuries – First Aid


Dealing with an eye injury is probably one of the most scary things for people to deal with. Often people don’t like touching the eyes, don’t like seeing any problems with them. Even things like watching people put contact lenses in the eye can feel quite bad. Also, one of the senses you’d least like to lose is your sight. So somebody with any eye injury is gonna be very very scared. Now you can damage your eye through different things. Maybe just a bit of dirt or grime in the eye, maybe a scratch, maybe an impaled object into the eye. Also got chemicals, and things like this can all do damage. An important thing to remember with any injury is, your eyes track together. So even if you’ve got one eye damaged, you need to cover both eyes. Because if you cover just this one eye up, and keep this one out, this eye under here is still moving. So what we’ve done here, is, we’ve got a plastic cup on one side. I held this plastic cup in with just a cut in a piece of gauze, and that just slides over the top of the cup. We’ve just bandaged that in place. We’ve also put an eye pad on this side, keeping the good eye closed, and also covering it up, so his sight’s taken away. But when you take someone’s sight away like that, you need to keep talking to them, maybe a hand on the shoulder, just so they know you’re still there, and try and keep them as calm as possible. Try and avoid putting the bandages over the ears, cause then you’re going to lose another of their senses. Don’t do it too tight, because again, that can be very uncomfortable. If you just push your fingers very gently onto your eyes, it can be quite uncomfortable. We’re just doing this really to stabilize him until the emergency services get there. The cup idea, if there was an impaled object, it’s held in that cup area, so nothing’s actually touching it. If you had somebody with chemical burns to the eyes, and problems like that, then bandaging is not the first thing you’d be doing. What we need to do is wash the chemical away using as much water as possible. You can use irrigation solutions, saline solutions, and pure water, or just run them under the tap. You need to make sure, if you’ve got a problem with chemicals in this eye, you need to tilt your head this way. You’re going to make sure the chemical comes out, you mustn’t let it get in the other eye. And also, from your point of view as the rescuer, anything to do with chemical type burns within the eyes, make sure that you keep yourself safe, make sure you keep it as irrigated as possible, and always, with any of these injuries to the eyes, activate emergency services as soon as possible.