First Aid Myth Debunked: Seizure

First Aid Myth Debunked: Seizure


Eh bro, you posing posing is it What happened?! Help these guys having a seizure! Eh bro, you really know what to do? Not your phone! A rock?! A spoon? Alamak! Not your shoe! First Aid Myth: debunked – seizure Call 995 Monitor casualty until fit stops put casualty to the recovery position Hand him over to the ambulance Have you ever had to administer first aid to someone? Let us know in the comments below

First Aid in Remote Locations – an unscripted overview!

First Aid in Remote Locations – an unscripted overview!


Hi I’m Alastair I am one of the trainers
that works on the First Aid in Remote Locations training course run by Lazarus
training as the name kind of suggests the course is designed for people
working in remote locations mainly media staff so thinking of production teams or
production companies that are traveling around filming in a variety of locations
the course covers a wide variety of topics ranging from things like the
obvious casualty assessments for major injuries like a big bleed we then
move into things like managing the airway and breathing we work our way
through to other injuries so talk about things like broken bones and burns but
we also have to then consider the different environments that people might
be working in so we look at the conditions that may be created by being
in hot environments then in cold environments and we also look at dealing
with people who may be ill due to working at altitude now the other thing
about the first-aid in remote locations course that we are quite proud about is
that whilst it’s only a three day course we’ve crammed a lot of material in and
we also bear in mind that sometimes when you’re working in remote locations you
might not be able to get to medical care very very quickly so we bring in context
of looking after somebody potentially looking after somebody overnight and
there’s no set definition of what a remote location is but one of the things
that we consider is that it means that you’re remote from medical help and
potentially you might even have to go and seek medical help i.e. take your
colleague with you to a hospital and so we look at that side of things about how
we might move somebody how we might stabilize fractures before moving
somebody and even how we might turn our vehicle into an ambulance now other
things that we’ll cover within this training is that we look at the
consequences of travel – travel health someone much wiser than me said once
that travel broadens the mind and loosens the bowels so we look at things
ranging from traveller’s diarrhoea through all the horrible bugs and
beasties that might get on your body or trying bite bits out of you or try to
live in you horrifically but we also look at things like vector-borne diseases
let’s say malaria and up to 35 other diseases transmitted by the same vector
so all in all a really tight package as I said already only lasts for three days
it’s aimed at people that are going to be working remote locations
but don’t want to become full-time medics so we keep it nice and simple
there’s loads of practical elements to it you’re looking at on average four or
five casualty simulations per day and that’s with a real-life person as a
casualty not a mannequin and we found that the course has been really well
received we’ve been running it now for about four years in the media sector so
we’re on kind of like version 2.4 or whatever it might be
and we’re constantly learning ourselves we’re picking up information from the
people doing the courses and finding out what they would like to see covered in
it and in fact we’re just in the process of doing another rewrite so if any of
you have attended the courses those of you that work in that kind of area if you’ve
got suggestions then feel free to drop them through to us and in fact we’d just
be keen to hear everyone’s feedback now if you’re watching this on YouTube I
think you can probably comment down below if you’re watching it on our
Facebook page probably the same and if you’re watching
this embedded into the respective page on our website then there’s a comment
area at the bottom of the page so feel free to get in touch
we’d love to hear from you and if you want to know any more about the
first-aid in remote locations course do feel free to get in touch

Ultimate Essential Ultralight Med Kit for Thru-hiking and Long-Distance Hikes

Ultimate Essential Ultralight Med Kit for Thru-hiking and Long-Distance Hikes


hi guys Sara Dhooma here and today you’re
gonna learn what goes into the ultimate ultra light med kit I see a lot of
people with really really big med kits that are just plain unnecessary when you
only want the absolute essentials to be light in your pack on your back I love making a mess let’s get started
these are Westcott titanium scissors I don’t actually carry a knife with me
I find that scissors are more versatile I use this from opening food packages to
cutting out pieces of dressing this is high perfect stressing its water
resistant and the adhesive is really comfortable on the skin I use this for
if I have some hot spots or any part of my body that might be rubbing like part
of my pack okay sewing kits part of first eight because
you might need to close a wound I have I have one pad and one tampon here
multi-purpose not just for menstruation but to stop bleeding like these are
great if you have a nosebleed be good okay I have a very small body glide here
if you’re more prone to change them you might want to take a bigger container
but I’ve been wearing the same pants close for a while and they fit me well
so I’m okay this is a little package of antifungal cream you might get some
athlete’s foot from albergue a or hostile floors so handy to have or for
ladies you might get a rash of narita blooms I have one like super emergency
blister pad here I haven’t used in years but I carry it with me just in case to
polysporin keeping cool cuts clean I have a couple pepto-bismol nausea
heartburn diarrhea okay so this is Elektra light tabs
I’m usually carrying a lot more electrolytes than this with the noon
tablets or the Myo drink stuff but I like to keep some tabs in my bed kit
just in case and these are water purification tablets each tablet does
one liter so in case my filter Falls I have something a couple safety kittens
oh sorry no me almost got you there they have a couple allergy pills
I do sometimes suffer from hay fever but this is great to have in case you have a
rash or you get stung by a wasp like I did on PCT at least two times this is
gravel it is anti nausea medication so if you’re hitching from a road and
there’s a lot of windy stuff you might get carsick so I take usually a couple
of these with me tweezers this is from Swiss Army knife you can order them
separately from outdoor stores and they’re really cheap and super super
small and light hydrocortisone cream get the rash I have one diarrhea tablet in
here that’s for extreme emergency I have an assortment of ibuprofen vitamin E and
some tylenol for pain relief and then I have some band-aids I drew some animals
on them just cuz it made it more fun let’s see how much this weighs my
friends plop it on papa 1.7 ounces and what’s
that in grams that is 48 grams the reason why you only need to take the
essentials is because you’re going to be hitting civilization on a regular basis
so if you start to use some of the things
in your kit like say you use the antifungal cream and you still have
athlete’s foot don’t worry because when you’re in town you can go
to the pharmacy and buy a big tube this is just essential stuff to get you
through whatever section you’re doing and same thing on the Camino de Santiago
there’s plenty of pharmacies along the way you don’t need to bring your entire
medicine cabinet discussion with me please subscribe if you’re not already
subscribed and check out my patreon page if you’d like to support this channel
cheers everyone

Helikon-Tex – Automotive Med Kit®

Helikon-Tex – Automotive Med Kit®


Automotive Med Kit® Made of Cordura® 500D Stiffened construction Reflective “Star of Life” on front Loop panel on front Reflective handles Detachable shoulder strap Hook and loop panel on back, compatible with most of the car upholstery; can also be used to attach the Med Kit to one of Rangemaster Gear Bag’s side pockets YKK® zippers with red pull tabs Numerous Versatile Insert System-compatible inserts included
Two zippered mesh pockets for small items Detachable, stiffened insert covered with loops

First Aid in Remote Locations – Venue and Course Overview

First Aid in Remote Locations – Venue and Course Overview


Hi it’s Alistair at Lazarus Training here
just thought we’d quickly check-in with you I’m here in the bright sun which is in my
eyes at the moment over at a venue we use in Bracknell near Reading in the UK
and we are here running a First Aid in Remote Locations course now this
venue if I move around slightly you’ll be able to see nice countryside nice
green English countryside lots of woods and forests that we’ll use perhaps I’ll try and do
some more video for you from some of these other sites later but the area
that I’m in at the moment is the area we use for our road traffic accidents see a
couple of the vehicles that we use around now I’m not a gambling man but if
I was for anyone traveling the world a road traffic accident/road traffic
collision/car crash whatever you want to call it that is what I would suggest is
going to be the main threat to life on most of the travels of our clients
horrible statistics in the United Kingdom for every hundred thousand
people 2.9 on average die from road traffic accidents but we’re here today
running for team of documentary makers that are travelling over various parts
of the world and for example they’re off to Columbia where if remember correctly
the figures of 16.9 in comparison and to a number of other areas where the risk
of death from car accidents is up to five times as high as in the UK the
other factor I guess that we need to think about is that here in the UK and
across much of Europe and many parts of the world there’s a really good
emergency response to incidents whether it’s done by the fire service the police
some parts of the world even the military and the ambulance service but in
many parts the world that the help is going to be delayed at best and often
not what we would expect from our home countries so we have to build some
resilience into the training and we have to get people used to the idea that they
may be operating with a delay from help there may be no help coming or that
help in itself might pose some risk to the colleague that is injured so quite a
lot of ground covered today on the course – they’re currently getting
some input on what to do about road traffic collision one of our trainers
Paul who had 30-something years in the fire service dealing with accidents is giving
them all that sort of knowledge distilled down
in some real takeaway points over the next half hour or so and later on in the
course they’re gonna find themselves dealing with all sorts of mischief over
here and see more vehicles there with injured people they’re gonna have
to care for and let them rehearse their actions and working together as a team
come up with an idea of how to care for people within the framework that
we’ve given them so I’ll leave it there for now I’ll go off and enjoy the
sunshine and a little bit more and I’ll try and catch some more video I’ll explain
what we’re doing here on this first aid in remote locations course as the days
progress. Bye then.

EDC Trauma Kit: Compact & Vacuum Packed

EDC Trauma Kit: Compact & Vacuum Packed


– Hello, everybody, and welcome to another episode
of the YouTube channel, Rugged Medicine. Today, I’m going to be sharing with you the components of my EDC trauma kit that’s in my everyday commuter bag that I made myself with
components I ordered online. Let’s have a look and see what’s in there. So, here is the kit that
I’ve been talking about. This is the size of the
trauma kit I carry with me at all times when going to work as it’s
just in my commuter bag. I don’t always have this in my pocket. Very compactly packaged. This is simply some
durable kitchen packaging. And it’s all been packaged
up with a vacuum sealer. Therefore, even if I get wet, in the typical British weather, the kit won’t actually get soaked. Within the kit are multiple components, some of which you can already identify. But let’s tear it open
and take a proper look. (plastic tearing) So, one, there is an H-VENT
made by H&H Medical Corporation, a chest seal with a valve. We have pair of nitrile
gloves, non-sterile of course. Packet of good-old, QuikClot Combat Gauze. A SWAT-T tourniquet which
is much more compact than most of the other
ones with a windlass on it. However, not always as easy-to-use if you’ve never practiced with it. And here we have just a sharpie or any type of other permanent marker, so you can make notes
on the actual packaging about anything you want to remember and, of course, to note
the tourniquet time on the actual tourniquet. Instructions are on the back. But, of course, as always, practice with the equipment
before you use it. That way you know what it actually does, how it works the best. And as always, I don’t think
I have to mention this, but just to be sure,
please only use this kit if you’ve got the
appropriate training for it. I have not yet used this chest seal, but I bought two of them. So one of them I’m gonna
sacrifice for practice purposes. And then of course, this
one is going to stay within my actual kit. And all of this together probably only weighs 250, 300 grams, so it’s very quite lightweight. And will it cover all
eventualities of trauma? No, it won’t. But this is just a basic
one that is so compact, I can keep it in my laptop bag. As always, I’ll also put the
links in the description, so you guys can see where I got this kit. And who the manufacturers
are, specifications and so on. There is going to be a lot of talk about the development of other
combat-gauze-style dressings, so hemostatic agents, but currently this was the ideal one and the most compact one I could find. And as I’ve been training
using combat gauze, I prefer to use equipment
that I know very well compared to something that I have not yet had any chance to practice with. So, that was just a quick summary of the items I carry
around with me every day. Thank you very much for
watching this video. If you haven’t done so, please like. Please subscribe, and I’ll see you on the next one.

Minuteman – Big Bag vs. Little Bag – Which Medkit is the Best – One Minute Battlefield 4 (BF4) Tips

Minuteman – Big Bag vs. Little Bag – Which Medkit is the Best – One Minute Battlefield 4 (BF4) Tips


Hi YouTube, Darth Here: Let’s talk bags. First up, the Medic Bag, also known as the
“Big Bag.” It’ll heal in a radius, heals constantly once it starts, but is paused by
suppression. I like to run this in very crowded infantry conditions like Lockers and Metro. And then there’s the First Aid Kit, also
known as the “Little Bag.” It has the advantage of healing through suppression so
you can keep on attacking. It’ll stick to friendlies if you toss it roughly near them,
and one is enough to heal from zero to full, as long as no damage is taken. The First Aid
Kit is pretty much my go-to in almost every situation. Now, you could combine them both, but giving
up a revive spot isn’t worth the synergistic effect. But it’s not a bad idea to hover
near a Big Bag if you’re running the little bags as their effects do combine. Something you might not know is that the Medic
Bag heals more slowly on higher tickrate servers. It gets more pronounced the higher the tickrate.
So the big bag becomes quite inferior to the little bag on higher tickrates. This is why
I almost always run the little bag. That’s it for this episode of Minuteman.
As always, thanks for watching and I’ll see you next time, YouTube.