First Aid on the Streets, Ep. 1: CPR


“Ah, ah, ah, ah, staying alive, staying alive Ah, ah, ah, ah, staying alive, staying alive” I might be a professional comedian but there’s nothing funny about providing first aid care That’s why I became a certified first aid instructor with the Canadian Red Cross and I’m headed to the streets to find out what you know about providing first aid care. Hey, hi, excuse me, this is not an emergency situation, I just want to talk to you about first aid, okay? Yeah, for sure. So how do you determine where to give a proper compression? Where do you think it is? Probably more centre of the chest. If you put your hand up like this and put it in your arm pit, right up to the top, then come straight across to the middle, right? You’ve got to be able to find with your palm where to go. Okay. “Staying Alive, Staying Alive, ah, ah, ah, ah, Staying Alive, Staying Alive” “Ah, ah, ah, ah, Staying Alive”… Place your hand and put it right underneath the armpit. So as soon as you slide right the chest to the centre, that’s exactly where you’ll start. Hi I’m Chris the mannequin And I want you to go to redcross.ca to sign up for a First Aid course so you can get the knowledge, skills, and the preparation to help people in an emergency situation. Just to be sure, by watching this video doesn’t mean you’re qualified to provide the first aid skills we’ve been talking about and any time you want to provide care, always ask first.

ABRIENDO UN FIRST AID KIT AMERICANO (CARLISLE MODEL)


Hi “guripas”! I’m about to open this time capsule. If you don’t know, it’s a very important item
of the American equipment in the WW2. Inside, soldiers
carried a first aid kit. Although the pouch is a reproduction inside I have an original kit. The Carlisle model. It took its name from
a military headquarters in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. There, a Medical Department Laboratory
was established by the army in the 20’s. What is inside? A bandage, compressed. It comes in a metal container and even it came
to be made of plastic. The objective was to protect
the bandage against chemicals and to ensure
that it remained sterile. Although it already
existed during the First World War, this container
was developed in 1940, WW2. More specifically this model
was manufactured between 1941 and 1943. We know this
because on the reverse it says that it contains
also an envelope of sulfanilamide. In fact, if you shake it
you’ll hear a noise like sugar. Well, the 1940 model
didn’t contain sulfanilamide. The later ones did. Another way to indicate it,
in addition to the text, was painting
the container in red-orange. As you see this item
after years in reenactment has chipped paint on the edges. Following introductions, let’s go! Let’s open it. I’m a little bit nervous. This is like opening a can. But a 75 years old can. There it goes. Here we go. That’s it! As I told you there is a bandage. As you can see I put on gloves
because it could happen that the sulfa envelope was damaged. Sulfonamides are a chemical
that kills bacteria. It’s not recommended to touch it
and much less to inhale it. So we encourage you
to do this with gloves. I’m also going to take this
to a recycling center in a pharmacy. Let’s continue. The envelope says
that it contains 5 gr of sulfa. It opens here. Let’s go with the bandage. Perfect. Here it is. It has instructions. In red letters. So, in case of an injury myself, or a partner will sprinkle
first the sulfa over wound. Then it’s time to apply the bandage. Remember that the red text
doesn’t go next to the wound. So let’s imagine that
my arm has a wound. We sprinkle the envelope
and then we apply the dressing. There are straps. Now you see them. So you can wrap the chest, head
or neck and tie the ends together. There were larger bandages but they didn’t fit in the container. It was something for medics. Towards the end of the war
a new bandage was created to camouflage
the white color so visible. Now it was darker. The container also changed. Instead of metal
the bandage came in a cardboard box in a plastic wrap that also
ensure that it remained sterile. That’s all. As I told you I will take this
to a recycling center in a pharmacy. I will close the container. To keep carrying it in reenactment. I keep the bandage out. It may be useful for a photoshoot
or to show what’s inside. The same with the envelope. And if you think I did wrong
because I damaged an original item you should know that
hundreds of thousands were produced. Nowadays there are still stocks. I have another one. They cost around 10 €
in any military collection shop. That’s all for today. I hope you liked
our first “unboxing”. If so, like and share. See you on next video. Dismissed!

What should be in a first aid kit? | First Aid Kit | iHASCO

What should be in a first aid kit? | First Aid Kit | iHASCO


Before we move on to the specific treatments and procedures, let’s have a quick look at a first aid as essential tool the first aid kit. Different industries different jobs and different hazards can all lead to different injuries and it’s these injuries that guide the selection of items in your first-aid kit. This is why there is no mandatory list of items that a first aid kit should contain. However the following would be considered a good general selection of items for a low hazard workplace 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters in assorted sizes appropriate to the type of work including hypoallergenic plasters if
necessary. 2 sterile eye-pads, 2 individually wrapped triangular bandages preferably sterile, 2 individually wrapped roller bandages preferably sterile, 2 large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings, 6 medium sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings, 6 safety pins and at least 3 pairs of disposable gloves. First aid kits should not contain any tablets or medicines. Used by dates should be regularly checked and any items which have reached their expiry dates, must be carefully and safely disposed of. And don’t forget to replace any items you use all throwaway

TROPA GURIPA 4×13 ABRIENDO UN FIRST AID KIT AMERICANO (CARLISLE MODEL)

TROPA GURIPA 4×13 ABRIENDO UN FIRST AID KIT AMERICANO (CARLISLE MODEL)


Hi “guripas”! I’m about to open this time capsule. If you don’t know, it’s a very important item
of the American equipment in the WW2. Inside, soldiers
carried a first aid kit. Although the pouch is a reproduction inside I have an original kit. The Carlisle model. It took its name from
a military headquarters in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. There, a Medical Department Laboratory
was established by the army in the 20’s. What is inside? A bandage, compressed. It comes in a metal container and even it came
to be made of plastic. The objective was to protect
the bandage against chemicals and to ensure
that it remained sterile. Although it already
existed during the First World War, this container
was developed in 1940, WW2. More specifically this model
was manufactured between 1941 and 1943. We know this
because on the reverse it says that it contains
also an envelope of sulfanilamide. In fact, if you shake it
you’ll hear a noise like sugar. Well, the 1940 model
didn’t contain sulfanilamide. The later ones did. Another way to indicate it,
in addition to the text, was painting
the container in red-orange. As you see this item
after years in reenactment has chipped paint on the edges. Following introductions, let’s go! Let’s open it. I’m a little bit nervous. This is like opening a can. But a 75 years old can. There it goes. Here we go. That’s it! As I told you there is a bandage. As you can see I put on gloves
because it could happen that the sulfa envelope was damaged. Sulfonamides are a chemical
that kills bacteria. It’s not recommended to touch it
and much less to inhale it. So we encourage you
to do this with gloves. I’m also going to take this
to a recycling center in a pharmacy. Let’s continue. The envelope says
that it contains 5 gr of sulfa. It opens here. Let’s go with the bandage. Perfect. Here it is. It has instructions. In red letters. So, in case of an injury myself, or a partner will sprinkle
first the sulfa over wound. Then it’s time to apply the bandage. Remember that the red text
doesn’t go next to the wound. So let’s imagine that
my arm has a wound. We sprinkle the envelope
and then we apply the dressing. There are straps. Now you see them. So you can wrap the chest, head
or neck and tie the ends together. There were larger bandages but they didn’t fit in the container. It was something for medics. Towards the end of the war
a new bandage was created to camouflage
the white color so visible. Now it was darker. The container also changed. Instead of metal
the bandage came in a cardboard box in a plastic wrap that also
ensure that it remained sterile. That’s all. As I told you I will take this
to a recycling center in a pharmacy. I will close the container. To keep carrying it in reenactment. I keep the bandage out. It may be useful for a photoshoot
or to show what’s inside. The same with the envelope. And if you think I did wrong
because I damaged an original item you should know that
hundreds of thousands were produced. Nowadays there are still stocks. I have another one. They cost around 10 €
in any military collection shop. That’s all for today. I hope you liked
our first “unboxing”. If so, like and share. See you on next video. Dismissed!

First Aid Myth Debunked: Seizure

First Aid Myth Debunked: Seizure


Eh bro, you posing posing is it What happened?! Help these guys having a seizure! Eh bro, you really know what to do? Not your phone! A rock?! A spoon? Alamak! Not your shoe! First Aid Myth: debunked – seizure Call 995 Monitor casualty until fit stops put casualty to the recovery position Hand him over to the ambulance Have you ever had to administer first aid to someone? Let us know in the comments below

First Aid in Remote Locations – an unscripted overview!

First Aid in Remote Locations – an unscripted overview!


Hi I’m Alastair I am one of the trainers
that works on the First Aid in Remote Locations training course run by Lazarus
training as the name kind of suggests the course is designed for people
working in remote locations mainly media staff so thinking of production teams or
production companies that are traveling around filming in a variety of locations
the course covers a wide variety of topics ranging from things like the
obvious casualty assessments for major injuries like a big bleed we then
move into things like managing the airway and breathing we work our way
through to other injuries so talk about things like broken bones and burns but
we also have to then consider the different environments that people might
be working in so we look at the conditions that may be created by being
in hot environments then in cold environments and we also look at dealing
with people who may be ill due to working at altitude now the other thing
about the first-aid in remote locations course that we are quite proud about is
that whilst it’s only a three day course we’ve crammed a lot of material in and
we also bear in mind that sometimes when you’re working in remote locations you
might not be able to get to medical care very very quickly so we bring in context
of looking after somebody potentially looking after somebody overnight and
there’s no set definition of what a remote location is but one of the things
that we consider is that it means that you’re remote from medical help and
potentially you might even have to go and seek medical help i.e. take your
colleague with you to a hospital and so we look at that side of things about how
we might move somebody how we might stabilize fractures before moving
somebody and even how we might turn our vehicle into an ambulance now other
things that we’ll cover within this training is that we look at the
consequences of travel – travel health someone much wiser than me said once
that travel broadens the mind and loosens the bowels so we look at things
ranging from traveller’s diarrhoea through all the horrible bugs and
beasties that might get on your body or trying bite bits out of you or try to
live in you horrifically but we also look at things like vector-borne diseases
let’s say malaria and up to 35 other diseases transmitted by the same vector
so all in all a really tight package as I said already only lasts for three days
it’s aimed at people that are going to be working remote locations
but don’t want to become full-time medics so we keep it nice and simple
there’s loads of practical elements to it you’re looking at on average four or
five casualty simulations per day and that’s with a real-life person as a
casualty not a mannequin and we found that the course has been really well
received we’ve been running it now for about four years in the media sector so
we’re on kind of like version 2.4 or whatever it might be
and we’re constantly learning ourselves we’re picking up information from the
people doing the courses and finding out what they would like to see covered in
it and in fact we’re just in the process of doing another rewrite so if any of
you have attended the courses those of you that work in that kind of area if you’ve
got suggestions then feel free to drop them through to us and in fact we’d just
be keen to hear everyone’s feedback now if you’re watching this on YouTube I
think you can probably comment down below if you’re watching it on our
Facebook page probably the same and if you’re watching
this embedded into the respective page on our website then there’s a comment
area at the bottom of the page so feel free to get in touch
we’d love to hear from you and if you want to know any more about the
first-aid in remote locations course do feel free to get in touch

Ultimate Essential Ultralight Med Kit for Thru-hiking and Long-Distance Hikes

Ultimate Essential Ultralight Med Kit for Thru-hiking and Long-Distance Hikes


hi guys Sara Dhooma here and today you’re
gonna learn what goes into the ultimate ultra light med kit I see a lot of
people with really really big med kits that are just plain unnecessary when you
only want the absolute essentials to be light in your pack on your back I love making a mess let’s get started
these are Westcott titanium scissors I don’t actually carry a knife with me
I find that scissors are more versatile I use this from opening food packages to
cutting out pieces of dressing this is high perfect stressing its water
resistant and the adhesive is really comfortable on the skin I use this for
if I have some hot spots or any part of my body that might be rubbing like part
of my pack okay sewing kits part of first eight because
you might need to close a wound I have I have one pad and one tampon here
multi-purpose not just for menstruation but to stop bleeding like these are
great if you have a nosebleed be good okay I have a very small body glide here
if you’re more prone to change them you might want to take a bigger container
but I’ve been wearing the same pants close for a while and they fit me well
so I’m okay this is a little package of antifungal cream you might get some
athlete’s foot from albergue a or hostile floors so handy to have or for
ladies you might get a rash of narita blooms I have one like super emergency
blister pad here I haven’t used in years but I carry it with me just in case to
polysporin keeping cool cuts clean I have a couple pepto-bismol nausea
heartburn diarrhea okay so this is Elektra light tabs
I’m usually carrying a lot more electrolytes than this with the noon
tablets or the Myo drink stuff but I like to keep some tabs in my bed kit
just in case and these are water purification tablets each tablet does
one liter so in case my filter Falls I have something a couple safety kittens
oh sorry no me almost got you there they have a couple allergy pills
I do sometimes suffer from hay fever but this is great to have in case you have a
rash or you get stung by a wasp like I did on PCT at least two times this is
gravel it is anti nausea medication so if you’re hitching from a road and
there’s a lot of windy stuff you might get carsick so I take usually a couple
of these with me tweezers this is from Swiss Army knife you can order them
separately from outdoor stores and they’re really cheap and super super
small and light hydrocortisone cream get the rash I have one diarrhea tablet in
here that’s for extreme emergency I have an assortment of ibuprofen vitamin E and
some tylenol for pain relief and then I have some band-aids I drew some animals
on them just cuz it made it more fun let’s see how much this weighs my
friends plop it on papa 1.7 ounces and what’s
that in grams that is 48 grams the reason why you only need to take the
essentials is because you’re going to be hitting civilization on a regular basis
so if you start to use some of the things
in your kit like say you use the antifungal cream and you still have
athlete’s foot don’t worry because when you’re in town you can go
to the pharmacy and buy a big tube this is just essential stuff to get you
through whatever section you’re doing and same thing on the Camino de Santiago
there’s plenty of pharmacies along the way you don’t need to bring your entire
medicine cabinet discussion with me please subscribe if you’re not already
subscribed and check out my patreon page if you’d like to support this channel
cheers everyone

Helikon-Tex – Automotive Med Kit®

Helikon-Tex – Automotive Med Kit®


Automotive Med Kit® Made of Cordura® 500D Stiffened construction Reflective “Star of Life” on front Loop panel on front Reflective handles Detachable shoulder strap Hook and loop panel on back, compatible with most of the car upholstery; can also be used to attach the Med Kit to one of Rangemaster Gear Bag’s side pockets YKK® zippers with red pull tabs Numerous Versatile Insert System-compatible inserts included
Two zippered mesh pockets for small items Detachable, stiffened insert covered with loops