Eye Injuries

Eye Injuries


Now let’s cover the topic of eye injuries,
of which there can be a couple of main types. One is an object embedded in the eye. The
other is a chemical in the eye. In this case, we’re going to be first addressing the object
in the eye. In this case we know that the worker was by a grinding wheel, and potentially
one of the brushes may have flown off the wheel and embedded in their eye. They’re in
a great deal of pain. We’ve gone ahead and assessed for scene safety, our gloves are
on, and also the patient is not suffering from airway, breathing, or circulation problems
at this time, so they’re remaining fairly stable. We guided them to a place where they
could be sat down carefully and now treated, and here’s what we’re going to do. We find
a cup. It’s important to understand that we want to actually get something that goes over
the wounded eye so that we don’t put any pressure on the object that’s embedded in the eye.
The second thing too is, if you have a medical grade cup, that’s fine, but you could also
use a Dixie cup or a drinking cup, a styrofoam cup, a coffee cup. It really doesn’t matter.
It doesn’t have to be overly large, because that’s going to cause some problems in trying
to bandage around it, so the smaller, the better. But we do want it to be at least deep
enough that it keeps the pressure off from that eye. The second point to make is that
we want to bandage both eyes shut because eyes tend to move together. So if we leave
one eye unbandaged so the person can see, when they move that eye they will also be
moving the affected eye, and we don’t want to cause further harm. The third point, and
lastly, we can have the patient assist us, when we’re having them hold the cup or hold
things in place while we bandage. So here we are. I’m just going to go ahead and put
this cup over your affected eye, ma’am. Go ahead and take your hand away. Now can you
hold that cup in place? Now the second thing I’m going to do– and be sure to talk to your
patient. They’re kind of blind at this point, so you want to be really communicating with
them, instead of making them guess what they’re feeling, like, “Now I’m putting a cup on your
eye, and now I’m going to throw a bandage on your eye.” Explain what you’re going to
do before you do it, so we don’t shock them. And then the other thing to remember too is,
once this is all bandaged, they’re blind. We’re going to have to lead them as if they
are blind, making sure to remind them where to step, how to step, so they don’t fall down.
And ideally we’re going to transport this patient via EMS, because there’s things that
we can do en route that might not be able to be done in a private car. But if the EMS
is not an option, private car may work as long as the patient is stable and doesn’t
have any other injuries that would stop them from being transported. So I took another
4×4 gauze. If you had an actual eye bandage, you could use that, certainly, but a 4×4 gauze
is not a problem either. Ma’am, I’m going to put this over your non-affected eye, and
you can hold that in place, and I’m just going to wrap a gauze around both of them. Go ahead
and let go of the cup side. I’m going to put a bandage around. Let me know if that hurts
at all, okay? Not the eye that’s hurt, but I mean, as I’m wrapping, any new pain. Now
I’m going to go ahead and wrap around this. You can let go. And I’m just going to continue
here. I know that’s over your nose, but I’ll move that in just a second, okay? I’m going
to continue to bandage around, and probably just a good couple times. You just want to
make sure that the cup is not going to slip. And then once you come back around to the
other side, we tuck the excess in underneath the bandage, as long as it’s not putting too
much pressure. Or you could always tape it in place. Is that fairly comfortable, ma’am?
I’m going to go ahead and lift this over your nose so you can breathe okay. Now the patient
is packaged and ready to go. Now we’re going to be doing our secondary survey, which is
doing a double-check. This is a pretty distracting injury, so it could take our eyes, our eyes
as rescuers, off from other things that might be happening. Maybe she fell after she got
the injury in the eye and hit her head. So we’re always going to be assessing for level
of consciousness, airway, breathing, circulation, signs of shock, and treating accordingly,
as we get this person into definitive care and back on track. And now let’s take a look
at the other type of eye injury, which is chemical burns. Whether a dry chemical or
a liquid chemical, it can cause a great amount of damage to this eye and the mucous membrane
of the eye in a relatively short amount of time. So getting the person to a position
where we can actually start to dilute the chemical as soon as possible is essential.
Now we would like to use a balanced solution as far as pH goes, but if you only have the
tap water out of a sink, or you have bottled water, drinking water, anything is going to
be better than nothing. If it’s a dry chemical, we’re going to brush as much of the excess
off as we can before we begin to dilute it and flush the eye. If it’s a liquid, we’re
just going to begin flushing. A key point here: If it’s one affected eye, we want to
go from the inside of the eye and rinse to the outside. We don’t want to cross-contaminate
eyeballs. We don’t want to flush from outside in, as it can then run over the bridge of
the nose into the non-affected eye. Now we’ve got chemical exposure to both eyes. Remember
that we’re going to flush for no less than 20 minutes to dilute and to bring the solution
into a position where it’s not causing damage. We’re going to transport this person to an
emergency room as soon as possible, and we’re going to watch for other life-threatening
issues. Remember, the chemical that went in the eye could have also gotten into the mouth,
nose, or airway, so we don’t want to take for granted that this is an isolated injury.
So we’re going to continue to assess our patient from head to toe, looking for life-threatening
situations like airway, breathing, circulation, or shock symptoms, and treat accordingly,
and then continue to flush those eyeballs out so that we can get the chemical out and
stop the burning from happening.

Make a Zipper Pouch with Jenny Doan of Missouri Star! (Video Tutorial)

Make a Zipper Pouch with Jenny Doan of Missouri Star! (Video Tutorial)


Hi, it’s Jenny from the MSQC. Tons of you
have been asking me how to put a zipper in a pouch. So today what we’re going to do
is we’re going to make a little pouch. And I’m going to show you how to put a zipper
in. And it’s so much easier than you think. So to make this project, what you’re going
to need is a zipper. And your zipper needs to be a little bit longer than the pouch you’re
making. And then you’re going to need scraps, and you’re going to need a piece of fusible
fleece. And fusible fleece is soft on one side and bumpy on the other because it irons
to your fabric. And you’re going to need one solid piece that is the, the size you
want, twice the size you want your pouch to be. So I’ve cut this one, this is about
9 by 20. I just cut a half of a width of fabric, just a little strip. And then for the top,
we’re just going to use scraps. And we’re going to make these darling pouches. You can
see, I’ve got several here. And they’re all different sizes. You make it for the size
you need. And I mean they’re just so fun and quick. I think you’re going to get really
addicted to these once you get going. So what I’ve done here is I’ve taken my
fleece and I’ve laid it on top of the wrong side so I’m fusing my fusible fleece, with
the bumps, to the wrong side of my fabric. And we’re going to go over to the iron to
do that. And this really just takes a minute. You just run your iron across it nice and
slow. You want to make sure probably that your fabric is a little bit bigger than your
fleece because you don’t want to stick it to your ironing board. So you just watch your
edges and make sure that it’s, it’s not hanging over or you’ll be stuck to something
you don’t want to be stuck to. So we’re just going to slowly go. And then I like to
kind of turn this over and do it from the other side as well. You just want it to stick
on there really good. These pouches are so much fun. I actually, when I started making
them to show you this tutorial on how to put the zipper in, I actually got kind of addicted
to making pouches. And I made several. And it’s just really fun and quick, I think
you’re going to love it. Alright so now we have to make the top of
our pouch. And what I’ve done here is I’m going to take this little scrap right here.
We might as well iron the wrinkles out of that. And I’m going to lay it right down
the middle of my, my piece of fabric. And then I have this 2 ½ inch strip that I’m
going to put on, right on the sides. And we’re going to sew this down like this. On either
side, we’re going to sew a strip. And so we’re going to head over to the sewing machine
and do that right now. So I’m going to lay this right sides together on here. Now what’s
going to be cool about doing this is that this will be completely quilted all the way
through as we, as we finish it. I’ll sew right along here but I’m sewing through
all three layers so it’s going to be quilted as we go. So let’s come over here and see
if we can get this going. Alright. Now I’m just using my regular quarter
inch foot. And you just make sure they’re lined up. And you, you saw, I really didn’t
even measure it when I put them on. It, it just doesn’t really matter. These are such
quick fun projects. So now I’ve sewn this side on, I’m going to go ahead and sew this
side on. And really what I’m doing is I’m just making a little decorative top for my
pouch. The pouch can actually be one solid piece of fabric. Alright now we’re coming
up to the end of this second strip and I’m just going to sew right off the edge. Alright
now let’s go press these back right over here. So I just lay them on the top right
here and I just roll them back, press them back. So you can see now really the top really
is pretty much done as it is. You can see that the quilting has shown right through
here. But I like the look of topstitching so I’m going to go back and I’m going
to topstitch right along these edges. So let’s do that. Now when I topstitch, what I’m
going to do is I’m going to put the edge of my foot right along the fold here. And
that will be my guide for topstitching all the way down. I think the topstitching just
kind of dresses up a little pouch. One of the things that’s fun about these pouches
is that I’m not organized by nature, I’m just not. And so pouches help me organize
things. I have one that put all my cell phone cords in when I travel. You know, I mean,
I use them for everything. So now we have this little finished topstitched
piece and we, we get to decide how big we want our pouch. So what I’m going to do
is I’m going to trim off my, my selvedge edges and my uneven edges. I’m going to
trim this side. We’re going to trim it to match the top of our piece here. So now see
how this fabric sticks out on this side. We’re going to go ahead and trim that even with
our, our edges. And what I do because sometimes my strips aren’t, you know, I mean, this
one I can see it’s curved in here. So it’s, it’s not exactly 2 ½, so I’m going to
measure from this line here out so to make sure it’s even all the way down. And we’re
just going to cut it right there at that point. This is just so much fun because you can,
I mean, you can any size, any fabric. You can personalize them for anybody, you know,
you know who might want one that’s a, like this one has bicycles on it. I mean it’s
just really fun. Alright. So now I have this long piece and
I can decide if I want short pouches like this or if I want one big long pouch. I think
what we’re going to do today is I’m going to make a couple of six inch pouches here.
And, let’s see, I think what I’ll do is use my mat to make sure I’ve got the right,
the right lengths here. And I actually think I’m going to do a nine inch. I’ve got
enough here, I’m pretty sure. Always fold over to check to make sure. You don’t want
to cut and have one bigger. So there’s a nine inch piece and I’m going to cut another
nine inch piece right here. We’re going to lay this on here, trim this off. Now I
could have gone ahead and made it a little bigger and used that whole piece. It’s really
whatever you want to do. This is your pouch. So now we have our top finished and it’s
already lined which is really cool. You can see how fast that went. And it’s time to
prepare our zipper. So what you want to do with your zipper, we have these 14 inch zippers.
And they come in all kinds of colors and you know, they’re just amazing. They’re nylon.
And so the cool thing about this is that you can, you can cut these any length. You don’t,
You’re not stuck by head and the little staple down here. You can cut them any length.
And you want to cut your zipper one inch shorter than your pouch. So the first thing we have
to do is prepare our zipper. Now to do that, I’ve cut a 1 ½ inch piece of fabric, just
a little piece right here, I think this is four or five inches long right here. So 1
½ you know by about five. And we’re going to come over here and we’re going to iron
this together. So what I’m going to do. Let me show you real quick here. Is I’m
going to fold this in half right here. And then I’m going to fold these pieces into
the center like this, and iron, iron the whole thing down like this. This is going to be
the beginning and ending piece of our, on our zipper. So this is kind of important.
So let’s go ahead and iron this down. And iron this down. This is like a tab. We’re
making a tab I guess. Make sure it stays nice and flat. A little shot of steam. I’m going
to fold that over. And then you get a piece that looks like this. So it’s just kind
of, it’s ironed together and together again. And this is going to be our ending piece on
our zipper. So here comes where you have to be a little bit brave. We’re going to take
this first zipper part here and where this staple is right here, we’re going to go
ahead and cut that off like this. And you want to make sure that your zipper head is
the other side of that. Then we’re going to put this little piece of our little folded
tab right here over the end like this. And we are going to topstitch right along this
edge right here. Just a tiny little topstitch and sew that down. So that now makes our end.
So I’m going to come over here and sew this little piece down, right here. And I like
to sew across and I like to sew back. And I try to hit it right on that same line. There
we go. And then, we’re just going to trim this off. Uh, oh, see here, look it, both
of my sides didn’t catch. You must make sure both of your sides catch. So let’s
go back and make sure those catch. That could have been dangerous. So let’s make sure
these catch. I’m always really glad actually when something like that happens because you
guys need to know that, not, I mean not everything we do works, just like that. I mean we, we
work at making sure these things work but you know, every once in a while something
like that happens. And it happens to all of us. So now we’ve got this tab end of our zipper
finished. And we’re going to lay our zipper along the edge of our bag. And we want to
cut our zipper one inch shorter than the bag. So I’m going to put my bag right along this
line. And I’m going to match up my zipper to the end. And then I’m going to come here
and I’m going to move in one inch. Now this is critical, really, really important. This
zipper head right here needs to be on this side. If you cut it off, you need to get a
new zipper. So we’re going to move this zipper head way down here so it’s safe.
We’re going to line these up. And then we’re going to cut one inch in. So here we go, one
inch in, we’re cutting across. And we’re going to do the same thing. So we’re going
to lay this, put this our little tab over the, over the ends of the zipper. And hopefully
we’ll catch both sides this time. This would be a great place to use a zig zag or a, you
know, a decorative stitch. So just make sure that they’re lined up like this. And you’re
just going to lay them in this fabric and sew them down. So let’s go over here and
do that. It’s a little easier when your two little tails are apart. It’s a little
easier to lay them together when you’re sitting at the sewing machine. Less chance
for movement. And then we’re going to just come along. Here we go. And over and back.
Alright. Check the other side–ha! Success! That one went very nicely. Then I’m, what
I’m going to do now is I’m just trimming these edges even with my zipper like that.
So now we have this little zipper that’s all prepared and ready to go. I like to zip
it and make sure that it works. And now comes the installing the zipper part. You’re going
to love this. It is so, so easy. So what we’re going to do is we’re going
to take our zipper and we’re going to put it face down on our fabric just like this.
We’re going to move it so that it’s like a half an inch in on either end. And I’m
going to start this way. It doesn’t matter which way you start. It just, my left-handed
brain sees things differently. So what I’m going to do now is I’m going to come in
and I’m going to stitch right along the side of this zipper. So your zipper is once
again, face down on the right side of your fabric and we’re just going to stitch a
little seam across here. Get, you know, you can, I mean I would stay a little bit away.
See how you can see these zippers a little bit. The zipper actually adds to the design
of the bag. So I don’t, I don’t sew all the way in but just kind of in between the
zipper and the edge. You want to make sure it catches good. And, and so you do that. So come with me over here and we’re going
to sew this zipper down. So the zipper is a half an inch in on either end. And easy
way to do this really is to, if you have where you can move your needle, you can leave your
quarter inch foot on and just scoot your needle over a little bit which is what I’ve done.
So now I’m just sewing straight down. And when you get to the part where the head is
you’re going to slide that head beyond the needle. So I’m going to lift up my, my foot
and just zip past that. And keep sewing it on. And just sew right off the end. Alright.
So we’ve actually installed one side of our zipper. Let me get these threads out of
the way. And so now what I like to do is I like to go back and I’m going to fold this
down like this. And now I’m going to topstitch it. Because again, I like the look of the
topstitch. And so we just lay this back and let me zip this closed. Lay this back and
we’re going to topstitch this right along this edge and that’s going to hold this
down. It sounds like a little more work going through
there. Alright, I’m to the head, I need to slide that under. The zipper head, go,
go, go. And I don’t know if you know this but on, when you lift your foot up, if you
push that lever a little further the foot goes even higher. So you can lift that foot
a little bit higher and slide that foot back. Alright. So now we have one half of our zipper
in. And it’s topstitched and it’s ready to go. Now we need to add it to the other
side. And we’re going to do the same thing. So we’re going to lay our zipper on, let
me see which side I have here, on the top side of our fabric, just like this starting
a half an inch in. And we’re going to sew all the way along this edge. And I’m going
to go ahead and pull this zipper down to give me a little bit of room to start with. So
again, just to make sure we’re clear. We’ve got the zipper facing down on the top side
of our fabric. And we’re going to sew right along that edge. So again, we place it a half
an inch along the top of our bag, a half an inch in. And we’re just going to sew along
here. Now I’ve come to the zipper so I’m going to lift my foot up, slide the zipper
head past my foot. Oh, there we go. Sometimes that’s a little bit of work. Oop, foot down.
Alright. And then we’re going to come back and topstitch this side. Alright. So now you have actually installed a zipper
in the top of your zipper bag. And it looks great. Now this is important, too. Make sure
your zipper is open because now we’re going to close our bag which means we’re just
going to put the right sides together, sew all the way around it like this, and that
will close our bag up. But if you leave your zipper closed, you have no way to turn your
bag. And so this, the zipper leaves us a hole to open our bag. So leave your zipper open
and we’re going to sew all the way around our little pouch. So we’re going to line
up our pieces up here. We’re going to come in, on that, just on the outside of that half
inch mark. And we are going to sew all the way around it. Now I like to go, because this is a raw edge,
one of the things I like to do is I like to go back and I like to zig zag around the side
of my bag just to make sure that things are, things are all, all in and good. Let me get
my zig zag ready here. Alrighty. Now we have a nice, flat, finished pouch.
Now if any of you have watched any of the bag tutorials, you know that if you want to
square up the bottom of your bag, what you’re going to do is you’re going to go in here
and you’re just going to pull these apart right here like this. And sew straight across.
And that will give us a flat bottom on our bag. And I think we should go ahead and do
that on this one. We’re going to, we’re just going to pull this out. We make sure
these seams line up here, top and bottom seam. And we’re just going to sew straight across.
Remember however wide, however far you come in from the point, if you come in one inch
then your. Oops, got to change my stitch back. Then your, if you come in one inch from the
point, then it’s going to be one inch out from each side. Alright, so now I’m going
to do this side. Pull it apart. I like to stick my hand in there. Line my seams up.
And then we’re going to stitch it across the bottom. You can leave it flat. I did several
that were flat. They’re darling. But this is a bigger pouch so I think it needs to be
able to, to stand up. So now I have these two little bunny ears which I can choose to
clip or to leave. I think I will just leave them. And now we get to turn our bag. This
is when the, the magic happens. This is when the fun part for me. So I’m just going to
push my bottom corners out. And we have a little pouch here. We’re going to push out
up here the ends of our zipper. And I just like the way, you know when you put a little
tab on a zipper it just makes it, it’s just a prettier closure. It just makes it nicer.
So here’s our little bag with our little zipper. Look at that. And you can see how
clean these ends look. I mean, I just, I really like the little tabs on the zippers. You can
actually sew the zipper right into the seam but I just like the look of these, these little
tabs. You know there’s lots of ways to do things. Now we have this darling little zipper
pouch. And now you know how to put a zipper in a bag or a pouch or anything else you need.
And we hope you enjoyed this tutorial from the MSQC.

First Aid on Locations – Delegate Feedback – Lazarus Training

First Aid on Locations – Delegate Feedback – Lazarus Training


*Hi I’m here with Sally and we’ve just
finished a two day locations course Sally have you enjoyed your course?* It has been a mixture of absolute excitement, trepidation, scary, but I feel
at the end of two days if I came across something some kind of car accident I
wouldn’t be one of those people anymore that stands on the outside
watching I’d be somebody that would get stuck in I wouldn’t be afraid to do that that’s
what I think it’s given me over the last couple of days I’ve never done any kind of
First Aid course before ever not since Brownies and it’s not a bit
like what I expected really full-on really as I said quite scary at times
I’ve had this slight feeling in my stomach almost for the entire two days as
what’s going to be next what are we going to see where are we going to see
the blood spurting out and you know what’s the next injury going to be I
can’t believe how quickly over just two days I’ve gone from feeling really
really anxious when I’ve seen somebody collapsed which is what we did
within the first half an hour to where I am now at the end of two days
coping with taking people out a car who’ve had an accident somebody with
blood pumping out and I feel it’s probably giving me the best chance I’m
going to have to save a life if I came across somebody in need.
*That’s brilliant Sally thank you.*

How to Avoid Shoulder Pain and Injuries

How to Avoid Shoulder Pain and Injuries


Hi, everyone. My name is Marjorie. I’m a passionate
physical therapist who happens to have a lot of interest in shoulders. So my friend Margaret
asked me to talk a little bit to you today about prevention on shoulder motion and shoulder
position. So here is the shoulder. So I’m just going
to go fast around the anatomy. This is your shoulder blade. This is your
collar bone, and this is the bone of your arm. Your rib cage happens to be there, and
the important thing to know about the shoulder is that you don’t have many bony attachments.
It’s mostly muscle that makes you move. So when you lift your arm, you have 14 muscles
that make that going well or going wrong. There is muscle on the shoulder, but there
is also this rotator cuff muscle that we hear a lot about, and the tendons are going through
that space there. So when you’re moving your arm, you can easily
squeeze those tendons, and that’s what we don’t want to do. So to prevent shoulder problems,
shoulder pain, there’s a couple easy tips that you can apply I would say when you’re
training or in your posture. For example, I’m going to turn that side. If this is my
shoulder, my right shoulder, you can imagine again the tendons going through there, and
if I have a rolled up posture, which is not really good for your back, for your bone health
if they’re fragile too — Margaret told you many times about this on blogs — so if I
have a rounded shoulder, the shoulder blade happens to be like this. So this bony part, which is named the acromion,
is going to dig into your tendons. As soon as you lift your arm, it’s going to squeeze.
We don’t want that to happen. So, first easy thing, stand up straight for your posture,
but also if you have to move your arm in that way. Moving or reaching for something, lifting
weights, got to keep yourself straight. Second important thing is that you have this
— I’m going to turn it back — this big part on the bone, and you can see like the shoulder,
you don’t have the screws in of course, is as stable as a golf ball on a tee, which is
a little surface. So it’s easily going up, down, sliding in front, sliding back if the
muscles are not working well. So, this big part — I won’t be able to do
it on that model, but I’m going to show you on my shoulder — is that if you lift your
arm, I’m going to go back a bit, if you lift your arm that way with the thumb up, the big
part of the bone stays on the side, preventing you from squishing your tendons in front.
But if what we see really often, your palm is facing down and you’re lifting weights,
for example in the gym, like this popular exercise, you’re going to have the big part
of the bone on top. So you’re going to be squishing your tendon pretty early. It doesn’t
hurt at first, but it’s going to hurt for sure at one point, and you can also begin
to have tendon tears from partial to complete. We don’t want that to happen. So just easy tip. Remember to keep your thumb
up when you’re lifting weights. So, instead of going like this, you’re going like this
with the thumb up. If you’re reaching for something or putting something at a higher
level, you don’t want to do it with the elbows open like this. It’s going to be a little
bit more squeezing the tendons. You want to keep them in and put things like that. It’s mostly for the first tips I have to give
you. So maybe see you next time. Have a nice day.

Day Hiking : Day Hike First Aid Tips

Day Hiking : Day Hike First Aid Tips


You’re going to want to take basic first aid
when your go on your day hike. There are a lot of different ways you can go depending
on your personal medical history, your medical needs as it were. You want to make sure that
you have just what you?re going to need for you hike. It never hurts to over prepare.
The first and foremost thing that you want to do is foot care because if you do start
to get a blister you going to want to make sure that you have Mull skin. Mull skin is
something that you will just cut out. As soon as you start to feel that heat that is established
or that is common with a blister. Your foot will start to burn. Usually it?s going to
be in the heel or the ball of the foot. Those are the two most common places to get a blister.
Soon as you start to feel that heat there, stop immediately, take your shoes and socks
off, cut out a piece of Mull skin, and put it on there and then re sock, re shoe and
you should be o.k. These basic kits here are just general first aid kits with band aids,
cut and analgesics, aspirin, decongestants, those sorts of things. Depending on how long
you?re going to be out, how many people you’re going to be hiking with that are going to
be using each of these first aid kits. So, you can pick that basically depending on the
hike you are going to be taken. Another thing to consider is cold care. If you’re going
in a place, if you’re going to Colorado in the winter it’s going to be cold. These are
chemical packs that you break up and stick in your pocket and they heat up so you can
actually put your hands in your pocket. You can put them in your shoes and that way you
stay warm.

Wilderness Medicine | Usable Ankle Injury


So yesterday Jordan rolled her
ankle while hiking, and since then we have taken it easy around camp, and we have been doing rest, ice,
compression, and elevation on this injury. Today, because Jordan has been willing to
use this injury and walk on the ankle, we’re going to have her hike. In order to have her hike, we are
going take some weight out of her pack, we are going to give her a supportive walking splint,
but most importantly we are going to use some tape to create a support, or an ankle tape job, for
her to be able to use this ankle without fear of injuring it again. As with all splints, it is important that we put
her foot in the position of function and for the ankle, that’s the foot at ninety degrees
compared to the lower leg. This is the position she is going to walk in. I am going to use approximately one roll of
tape for this particular tape job, so you
might think that you if you are going to tape somebody for multiple days you are going
to need a number of rolls of tape to accomplish this. The first thing I am going to do is
create a landmark for myself above which I do not need to tape. That
landmark is going to be approximately two inches above her outer ankle bone, or three finger widths, however you prefer
to measure. The next thing I am going to do is create
some stirrups that are going to keep her foot well seated on her tibia. I can measure my stirrups with the
sticky side of the tape outwards and then tear my tape. I am going to target my
first stirrup coming under the arch of her foot and across the top of her inside and
her outside ankle bone. I will do two more stirrups. I will put one in front of my first
stirrup and one behind my first stirrup. Okay, so we have three stirrups
on Jordan’s ankle that fan on either side of the ankle bone. I am going take
another piece of tape and re-anchor those so that they stay secure. The next thing I am going to do is create “J’s.” The “J” is going to start at the anchor
on the un-injured side of her foot. It is going to come under the arch of her foot, across the top of her foot, and end right where it started. I call those “J’s.” Sometimes people call them
“teardrops.” Again, I am going to do three of those, each time
fanning them out. The next thing I am going to do are figure eights and,
similarly, I am going to do three figure eights. To make it simple, I am going to start in
exactly the same place on the uninjured side. I am going to come under the arch of the foot. I am going to come across the top of her foot and target her inside ankle bone. I am going to to come behind the Achilles and target
her outside ankle bone. I am going to come across the top of her foot and back underneath to the arch. So the figure eight is made by having a
loop behind her Achilles and a loop under the arch of her foot that crosses right on the top of her foot. I could at this point rip my tape and start a new figure eight, or I can go continuous and keep going and
add two more figure eights. Now I am going to rip the tape, and secure it under the arch of her foot. At
this point I want to evaluate my tape jab to see whether there are any gaps in
tape or any specific spots where she is going to complain of rubbing or friction. If I see any holes in my tape job, I can
take a little bit of tape, cover up those bare spots of skin so they don’t get rubbed inside her shoe
or her boot. At this point, having put something circumferential around her
foot, I can reassess her CSMs. Can you move your toes for me? So she has good motion. Which toe am I touching?
Jordan: Pinky toe.
Great.

First Aid for Splints & Bleeding Wounds : How to Apply a Shoulder Sling

First Aid for Splints & Bleeding Wounds : How to Apply a Shoulder Sling


My name is Alv Rios and I am a paramedic with
Lansing Mercy Ambulance on behalf of Expert Village. In this clip we are going to go over
splinting collar bone injuries and also shoulder injuries. And helping me is going to be my
partner Jacob Barber who works with me at Lansing Mercy Ambulance and he will be doing
this on behalf of Expert Village. It’s pretty hard to differentiate whether or not it’s
the collar bone that is fractured or the shoulder since they are both going to cause a lot of
pain if the patient tries to move their arm. So what you want to do is just assume that
it is probably the collarbone since the shoulder it’s self is a pretty strong bone. So what
you want to do in this situation is use anything, like I have a triangular bandage here. Or
you could use something such as a bandanna or you could even cut a piece of cloth as
long as you have it in this type of shape right here. What I like to do is take the
top corner of my triangle and I like to tie it into a knot. What this is going to do is
form a pocket for the actual elbow to rest in. What I then want to do is have the patient
put their arm in a position of comfort. Normally when you have a shoulder injury this is the
type of position that you are going to find the patient in. What you then want to do is
slip this over. You will see how this pocket here for the elbow will kind of just hold
itself in place there. Then I am just going to have you turn for a second. Just want to
come and you want to tie this in a spot where it’s more comfortable for the patient. Right
here in the back is nice rather than some people that tie it on the neck. Both will
work but it is wherever is just comfortable. If you do tie it in a position where it has
to be on the neck consider using some padding for a little more support. Once I have tied
this in place this is given a little bit of relief from the shoulder having it have to
do less work but there is also going to be pain every time the arm moves. If the arm
moves forward the joint is still moving. So we haven’t quite immobilized it yet. That
is a nice adequate splint that will work if the patient wants to hold it themselves but
if you are going to be doing any long transports. What you are going to want to do is actually
use another dressing here. Again go to a position of comfort. I am going to turn you first here
again. I am going to tie it behind his back. What this will do is help keep the arm against
itself and it reduces the motion of letting the arm move forward where the lower arm can
still move but the shoulder it’s self stays in place. You have now adequately immobilized
the shoulder and or clavicle whichever one is effective.

First Aid: Stroke

First Aid: Stroke


Mrs D? Oh, man. Mrs D? F.A.S.T. F- face. It looks a bit droopy. Can you give us a smile, Mrs D? (The woman mumbles) A – arms. Mrs D, can you raise your arms for me? Mrs D? That’s it. And the other one? S – speech. Mrs D, speak to me. Tell me how you’re feeling. (The woman mumbles, frustrated) T – time. Time to call an ambulance. Don’t worry, Mrs D, I’m not going anywhere. I’m just getting us some help. Hello? Can I have an ambulance, please? I’ve done the F. A. S.T. test and I think it’s a stroke… Mrs D, don’t worry. I’m not going anywhere, Mrs D. It’s okay. Help’s on the way, it’s going to be fine. Carry out the FAST test Face: is there a weakness on one side of the face? Arms: can they raise both arms? Speech: are they easily understood? Time: to call 999. Remember:
Carry out the FAST test

What OT Can Do For You: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

What OT Can Do For You: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)


You ready? 1, 2, pull up. I see
Scott engaged more, I see him lift his head up, I see him attend to things. Give me one more hit with the soccer ball. Thank you, that’s awesome. All right, let’s
try ultimate problem-solving profession,
because every day I have a chance to engage with somebody like Scott and I’m
going to figure out how to break through. I can use things that are really
familiar to him. He’s a race car driver, so I can use the steering wheel. If it’s
something that he knows about, he’s going to be like, oh yeah, that’s mine, I know what that is. Every idea that she’s had I’ve never even thought of. Just like we were
practicing over on the mat, we’re going to practice on keeping your head up. We’re
going to practice sitting up on your own. You got it? Nice. He didn’t move, he
wouldn’t do anything, and we’ve only been here three weeks and I would have never
thought we would have made it this far. It’s going great, he’s doing good. You got
it.

Mohamed, le réfugié qui veut aider les réfugiés

Mohamed, le réfugié qui veut aider les réfugiés


We are going to the hospital to visit sick refugees… to visit them and help them. What is it like coming back to Calais? I remember this place because I worked here. They were my friends I helped people in the jungle. Did you ever think of going to England? I never considered it.
When I arrived in France, I applied for asylum here For me it wasn’t the same, as it is for other refugees, who had someone over there and spoke a bit of English, who wanted to leave and go to London. There are lots of opportunities here to work in the social sector here. Who are we going to see, Mohammed? We are going to visit a Sudanese guy, who is sick. Good morning! Hi! Hi Mohammed, nice to meet you. How are you? How’s it going? Good? – How is school going?
-It’s going well – How you doing? Getting better? – I’m fine. I am very happy to see you again, everyone says hello. – Everybody is fine, they say hello to you! – I should have my results in June, I’ll know if I’ve passed my exams. If I pass this exam in June, I can carry on learning French. – I hope you will pass!
– Thank you brother. I hope so too. And how is your application for asylum going? Are your papers in order? Yes, I have received my ten year residence permit. Oh, how lucky you are! So, you will be here for a long time. – Happy New Year! How do you say that in French?
– Nouvel an. What is it like having this new life? If I stay here, around Calais, I could help many people. Not lots and lots of people just yet, because I don’t have my degree certificate yet. But if I finish my MA in social work I can set up an organisation. That is what I did in Afghanistan. I have to work hard and give everything I have in order to succeed. What are you doing Mohammed? I am cooking. I am rinsing the rice. It’s an Afghan and Iranian dish. Rice, potatoes, spinach I am cooking for 10 people for this evening’s meal. Yes, I am cooking Do you cook often? Yes, when I come here to Calais, but at home too, I cook there too. Afterwards, we will eat together I like cooking. Is that it? Is it done? Yes, it’s finished! -Whose is that?
-For me!
-And rice?