Back Pain in Children | Stress Fracture of the Spine | Vail, CO Spine Surgeon | TV8 Vail

Back Pain in Children | Stress Fracture of the Spine | Vail, CO Spine Surgeon | TV8 Vail


welcome back to good morning vail doctor
donald corenman has joined me he is here to represent the steadman clinic we’re
going to talk about something very interesting today something i hadn’t
thought a whole lot about and that is back pain in children good morning
good morning thank you so much for coming in it’s my pleasure this is an interesting
topic i don’t necessarily think of kids having back pain obviously us adults it seems
to be a chronic thing right but in kids it’s actually relatively common and many docs will see kids with back
pain and because it comes intermittently and
kids don’t complain it’s not really pursued but back pain in kids can represent a
condition that one in twenty kids has that is a fracture really yes it’s a stress fracture just like taking a
coat hanger and bending it enough times so it actually
breaks the bone will do the same thing i had no idea well kids think they are invincible exactly
and they try and ignore everything and you know as a parent the kid won’t
complain to you and so your child if he starts
to have funny gaits or sits funny or has issues you really have to pay
attention to that is it the upper back, lower back or can it be anywhere sorry it’s lower back
lower back yes you have some pictures that are going to
reflect this and give us a really good idea of what you’re talking about we are
going to put those up first of all this one so this is a typical side view of
the spine in the lower back and everybody has an idea of what the spine
looks like you can see the disc in the center and the nerve
coming out and then in the back you see this little hook called the pars interarticularis it’s a fancy latin
term that just means area between the two joints and that’s the area that
can get stressed and break then let’s move on to the next
picture because does that show the natural stress fracture this is an actual stress
fracture its a CT scan of a young boy twelve years old and if you look at the arrow you’ll see
a little break in that bone and that’s what causes this back pain in
these kids if it’s recognized early you can
treat it and it will heal but if it goes unrecognized let’s go to
the next picture next picture is looking down
this is exactly right looking down and the arrows are pointing to the fracture
itself okay and that fracture if the kid continues to do the activities
that he normally does it won’t heal does that build up like an arthritis or
something in there that’s the next picture i am jumping ahead sorry
so let’s go to the next picture this is what happens when the condition
sits there for a long time the vertebrae actually slips forward you
can see the small arrow on the bottom and the large thick arrow points to the area
where the fracture never heals and the long arrow points to the nerve root and
the bone spur that presses into it so then you start getting that pain because it’s
pressing into that nerve exactly okay and then you do have one final picture here
what does this one represent this vertebra looks displaced
exactly you can look at the vertebrae and you can see the vertebra slipped
forward and this is the end stage if you don’t
catch the fracture early that’s why it is so important to pay
attention to kids what are the long-term effects of that some patients have incapacitating
back pain and need surgery some patients can live with it but it’s
really an issue that needs to be identified early so it’s just something
to be aware of and then if your child is is talking about any back pain or has
been in an accident recently exactly but most of these kids don’t have
an accident it’s a chronic it’s a chronic stress
and they are growing so fast well obviously that’s something you want
to follow up on immediately and you are with the steadman clinic correct
they can just call them directly if they need to set up an appointment with you and
get further information yes that would be fine terrific thanking you for comingin and
that’s very interesting information definitely and if you would like further
information you can call the steadman clinic doctor donald corenman is a doctor
at the steadman clinic and the number to call is 970-479-5895
or you can call 970-476-1100 as well
we’ll be back in just a moment

8 Feb 2018 news today – benefit, relief mental health advice and news


hi I’m Andy Bailey from and the Emmys
video diary walking and talking v-log on Facebook and on YouTube and E and M s
that’s where you see me that’s where you find me come along and you’ll be part my
community now every morning I have Google Alerts go off well I shouldn’t
come into my inbox and tell me about certain things to do with multiple
sclerosis depression anxiety those kind of things so I can keep up to date with
what goes on in those things these are some of the things that have caught my
eye this morning we’ve got the social care system is in crisis okay with
patients receiving 15-minute visits what the hell are you gonna do with 15
minutes forget about it oh dear see what are you gonna do with 15 minute things
what are you gonna do what are you gonna do what you’re gonna do come in come in
hey yeah we’re gonna talk okay bye and forget about it hmm
what are you gonna do with 15 minutes there are some people that are only
getting one minute visits please please that’s unacceptable there are these are
the most vulnerable people in our society they’re elderly the disabled the
the mentally healthfully challenged people the vulnerable people and they’re
not getting proper thing I can understand where the NHS is coming from
they’ve got a cut corn not cut corners but cut costs it’s the bottom line
because other people are telling them that but you can’t just look at the
price because look at the cost of that my friend says his mum my Polish friend
says his mom says cheap is expensive and that’s so true especially in this case
if you’re keeping it out on on the assessments on the care on the system
within and looks after the vulnerable people that’s gonna cost you in the
future in palliative care in depression for the
people that are the carers oh there’s so many though a ripple effect go now so
you take care of this you take care of a lot of the other things happen but they
can’t do that because that bits expensive to do
they don’t look ahead to see when it costs in the future the bean counters
talking about bean counters the DWP bean counters they’ve got to review 220,000
benefit claims so people with mental health conditions like autism depression
anxiety etc etc all those people those kind of things are gonna be reassessed
and that’s because dwb have just messed it up and talking of bean counters the
bean counters work out that how much does it cost to refuse you your pip and
how much does it cost to fight it in court and then how much will it cost if
they get told to do the proper job and they worked it out and the balance is
it’s cheaper for them to say screw off me oh you can’t have nothing and then
people like oh shit alright then because you know they might have mental health
anxiety and they don’t want to cause a fast and they’re too guilty about stuff
cos being stigmatized for having mental health problems mmm or do they know that
only a certain amount of people will appeal only a certain amount of people
will take you to court judges have ruled that most of these cases that come into
the court for appeal shouldn’t even have got to the appeal the police used a
Crown Prosecution Service system and if they don’t have the evidence you don’t
get taken to court that’s how it works for criminals that’s why the everybody
the knives everyone me because police have got to prove it before they any
even tell you to call different with the dwb a tox and independent Assessors
because it’s cheaper for them to say no because they know that a certain
percentage enough people will not appeal for it to be more profitable to say no
than it would be to just give you what you deserve and that’s just business
that’s how it works unfortunately that’s the that’s the game
so you’ve got to appeal especially if you’ve got mental health problems all
your caring for someone with mental health problems like autism depression
anxiety etc so stay on it good news there for you yeah now some good news
they could drinking four cups of coffee might help your ms well mines the
cappuccino of I said don’t do encapture anymore because the milk makes me fat
milk is basically baby cow growing juice they would grow baby cows with with milk
I have soy milk now cuz I’m a hippie can is help huh
but I knew that caffeine is supposed to be good for you either got a recipe from
Jamie Oliver how to make granola dust which I have everyday with vanilla
soymilk oh it’s gorgeous with some frozen fruit in Israel uh Aimee GERD
it’s so good so caffeine I put bear caffeine in my
granola as caffeine is supposed to be good for you I don’t
I’m not sure it can be as simple as against just having drinks of coffee but
you know puppy now I want to tell you about anxiety or overcoming a particular
period of anxiety this is really good this system is something that I use
constantly when I’m anxious in the mornings okay look at this try this if
you start to get me shaky there’s a woman she called Mel Robbins she wrote a
book called five four three two one the five-second rule she did the audiobook
as well listen to it I’ve read it is brilliant and she’s only telling you
stuff that you already know the best thing about it is she’s not inventing
anything new she’s using references to Harvard and to medical studies and stuff
and really is a good thing but she says something in one of her books about
anxiety she says if you ever been in the car as a passenger drive it doesn’t
matter and a card just misses you like you like internally externally whether
it shows all night doesn’t matter in turning your boom and your brains out
Wow I need weed I then fight or flight or it’s okay it’s over calm down calm
down everything’s go over this guy was it
gradually together now anxiety is like having that but it happened at the
kitchen sink just you and there is a disconnect there from what your brain
can see and experience and what you’re actually feeling the chemicals that have
been released in your brain the adrenaline the cortisone whatever it is
that gets released when you reveal like that so that’s what
anxiety is to her and it does make sense so if you ever get that kind of oh
here’s something that will help you because I used it loads and it does work
it really does it worth Gojo okay when you’re on your own and you’re feeling it
dumb at no one I know are you doing it right listen look find five things right
the you can see actually look at the things okay I can see a blind I see a
lighthouse thing for my VR exam I can see my audio mixer flashing there I can
see the bottle of water that I used to drink water and I can see an off monitor
I can see their things don’t just pluck things that are able to be seen but
things are you see right now it’s called grounding that’s part of mind for us
four things that you can touch you can reach out and touch I can reach out and
touch this mouse I can reach out and touch a keyboard I can reach out and
touch this cable feel what that cables I use mindfulness again I can reach out
and touch a vicks vapor nasal never I can imagine what it smells like
talkative things three things that you can hear right now that you can actually
feel the vibrations going into your brain I can hear the fan on the computer I can in the fridge downstairs gonna I can either rain outside hitting some
windows and we’re mindful things you can actually hear not things that can be
heard okay two things that you can smell I can smell the soap on my hands the
vanilla soap or lush I really like that so I like it a lot
well I can smell it is warm from the radiator it’s got that smell you know
yeah I know one thing that you can taste now this is something you could lick us
puros but i prefer something that can already taste cuz there’s always a
memory of something that i tasted before oh it’s the steamed veggies I had for
lunch I’ve tasted even the cheese right and that is the kind of thing the
mindfulness thing and that’s how you can reconnect and once you’ve done that you
realize you’re not anxious anymore just take five things five four three two one
just take a moment do it well worth it may I like it now good news if you have
a zit acne is increase risk of depression isn’t that good news they
would look I’m gonna spot oh good no the what they’re saying is within the
first five years about my acne you’re more likely to get depressed I remember
I got well sad and depressed one of those gonads is it actually I wasn’t I
was almost quite proud of that aspect we gonna draw a big circle ads are going
sit with a big arrow but when you get older is different and so now they’re
advising doctors in the first five years keep an eye out for depression and
depressive signs and people and GPS are trained to notify and notice these
things so those are the things that picked out in the news today I am loony
o of the geek fun I am Andy Bailey on M s video diary and Andy an MS on YouTube
and loony fun on some other streaming places by Mandy this has been the MS
news today this morning welcome see you later – louve did it oh I could do that
you know

PHILOSOPHY – David Hume

PHILOSOPHY – David Hume


The 18th century writer, David Hume, is one of the world’s great philosophical voices because he hit upon a key fact about human nature- that we are more influenced by our feelings than by reason. This is, at one level, possibly a great insult to our self image, but Hume thought that if we could learn to deal well with this surprising fact, we could be both individually and collectively a great deal calmer and happier than if we denied it. Hume was born in Edinburgh in 1711, to a family that was long established but far from rich. He was the second son and it was clear early on that he would need to find a job eventually, but nothing seemed to suit him. He tried law, the vocation of his father and his older brother, but soon decided that it was: “a laborious profession, requiring the drudgery of a whole life.” He was considered for academic posts at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Glasgow, but he didn’t land either job. So, he set out to become a public intellectual, someone who would make his money selling books to the general public. It was pretty hard-going. His first book, ‘A Treatise of Human Nature’, for which he had the highest hopes, met with a dismal reception. “Never literary attempt was more unfortunate than my Treatise”, he wrote. “It fell dead-born from the press, without reaching such distinction as to even excite a murmur along the zealots.” But Hume kept at it, realising that the blame largely lay with the way that he had expressed his ideas. And doggedly training himself to write in a more accessible and popular manner, eventually, he did find an audience. his later works: popular history books and collections of elegant essays were best-sellers of the day. As he would say, not without some pride: “The money given me by booksellers much exceeded anything formerly known in England; I was to become not only independent but opulent.” Humes philosophy is built around a single powerful observation: that the key thing we need to get right in life is feeling rather than rationality. It sounds like an odd conclusion. Normally we assume that what we need to do is train our minds to be as rational as possible, to be devoted to evidence and logical reasoning and committed to preventing our feelings from getting in the way. But Hume insisted that whatever we may aim for – reason is the slave of passion. We are more motivated by our feelings than by any of the comparatively feeble results of analysis and logic. Few of our leading convictions had driven by rational investigations of the facts. We decide whether someone is admirable, what to do with our spare time, what constitutes a successful career, or who to love on the basis of feeling above anything else. Reason helps a little, but the decisive factors are bound up with our emotional lives, with our passions, as Hume calls them. Hume lived in a time known as the Age of Reason, when many claimed that the glory of human beings consists in their rationality, but for Hume a human is just another kind of animal. Hume was deeply attentive to the curious way that we very often reason from not to our convictions. We find an idea nice or threatening and on that basis alone declare it true or false. Reason only comes in later to support the original attitude. What Hume didn’t believe however was that all feelings are acceptable and equal. that’s why he firmly believed in the education of the passions. People have to learn to be more benevolent, more patient, more at ease with themselves and less afraid of others. But to be taught these things they need an education system that addresses feelings rather than reason. This is why Hume so deeply believed in the role and significance of public intellectuals. These were people who (unlike university professors that Hume grew to dislike immensely) had to excite a passion-based attachment to ideas, wisdom and insight. Only if they succeeded would they have the money to eat. It was for this reason that they had to write well, use colorful examples and have recoursed wit and charm. Hume’s insight is that if you want to change people’s beliefs reasoning with them like a normal philosophy professor won’t be the most effective strategy. He’s pointing out that we have to try to adjust sentiments by sympathy, re-assurance, good example, encouragement and what he called “art”. And only later, for a few determined souls, should we ever try to make a case on the basis of facts and logic. A key place where Hume made use of the idea of the priority of feeling over reason was in connection with religion Hume didn’t think it was rational to believe in god. That is – he didn’t think there were compelling logical arguments in favor of the existence of a deity. He himself seems to have floated between mild agnosticism (there might be a god, I’m not sure) and mild theism (there is a god, but it doesn’t make much difference to me that there is). However the idea of a vindictive god, someone ready to punish people in an afterlife for not believing in him in this one, this he considered a cruel superstition. Hume’s central point is that religious belief isn’t the product of reason. So arguing for or against it on the basis of facts doesn’t touch the core issue. To try to persuade someone to believe or not believe with well-honed arguments seemed particularly daft to Hume. This is why he was a foremost defender of the concept of religious toleration. We shouldn’t treat those who disagree with us over religion as rational people who’ve made an error of reasoning and so need to be put right, but rather as passionate emotion-driven creatures who should be left in peace so long as they do likewise with us. Trying to have a rational argument over religion was for Hume the height of folly and arrogance. Hume was what is technically known as a skeptic someone committed to doubting a lot of the common sense ideas of the day. One of the things he doubted was the concept of what is technically called “personal identity”. The idea that we have that we can understand ourselves and have a more or less graspable and enduring identity that runs through life. Hume pointed out that there is no such thing as a ” Core Self ” “When I enter most intimately into what I call “myself”,” he famously explained, “I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch “myself” at any time without a perception and can never observe anything but the perception. Hume concluded that we aren’t really the neat definable people reason tells us that we are and that we seem to be when we look at ourselves in the mirror or casually use that grand and rather misleading word ” I “. Yet, despite being skeptical of temper Hume was very happy for us to hold onto most of our common-sense beliefs because they are what help us make our way in the world Trying to be rational about everything is a special kind of madness. Hume was making a slight dig at Descartes. The French philosopher had died 60 years before Hume was born. But his intellectual influence was still very much alive. He had argued that we should throw out every fruit of the mind that wasn’t perfectly rational. But Hume proposed that hardly anything we do is ever truly rational And yet he ventured that most beliefs are justified simply because they work They’re useful to us. They help us to get on with what we want to do. A test of a belief isn’t its provable truth but its utility Hume was offering a corrective which we sometimes badly need to our fascination with prestigious but not actually very important logical conundrums In opposition to academic niceties he was a skeptical philosopher who stood for common sense Championing the everyday and the wisdom of the unlearned and the ordinary. Hume took a great interest in the traditional philosophical topic of Ethics A conundrum of how humans can be good. He argued that morality isn’t about having moral ideas It’s about having been trained from an early age in the art of decency through the emotions Being good means getting into good habits of feeling. Hume was a great advocate of qualities like wit, good manners and sympathy because these are the things make people nice to be around outside of any rational plan to be good. He was hugely struck by the fact that a person and here again, he was thinking of Descartes could be ostensibly rational and yet, not that nice. Because being able to follow complex argument or deduce trends from data doesn’t make you sensitive to the sufferings of others or skilled at keeping your temper. These qualities are the work of our feelings So, if we want people to behave well, what we need to do is to rethink education We have to influence the development of feeling We have to encourage benevolence, gentleness, pity and shame through the seduction of the passionate sides of our nature, without delivering dry, logical lectures. Hume’s philosophy always emerged as an attempt to answer a personal question. What is a good life? He wanted to know how his own character and that of those around him could be influenced for the best. And oddly, for a philosopher, he didn’t feel the traditional practice of Philosophy could really help. Though he was scholarly, he was in large part, a man of the world. For some years, he was an adviser to the British ambassador in Paris who welcomed his shrewd wisdom. He was much liked by those around him, known by the French as ‘Le Bon David’, a humane, kind and witty conversationalist, much in demand as a dinner companion. he insisted. That’s the way Hume lived. Not in the intellectual seclusion of a monastery or ivory tower, But deeply embedded in the company of other humans, dining. He especially liked roast chicken, chatting about love and career and playing Backgammon. Hume died in Edinburgh in August 1776, at home, in his house in St. Andrew’s Square His doctor wrote about the last hours to Adam Smith, for many years, Hume’s best friend. Hume remains a rather outstanding thing. A philosopher, alive to how much Philosophy can has to learn from common-sense.

How to practice emotional hygiene | Guy Winch | TEDxLinnaeusUniversity

How to practice emotional hygiene | Guy Winch | TEDxLinnaeusUniversity


Translator: Yuanqing Edberg
Reviewer: Ivana Korom I grew up with my identical twin, who was an incredibly loving brother. Now, one thing about being a twin
is it makes you an expert at spotting favoritism. If his cookie was even slightly bigger
than my cookie, I had questions. And clearly I wasn’t starving. (Laughter) When I became a psychologist, I began to notice favoritism
of a different kind. And that is how much more
we value the body than we do the mind. I spent nine years at University
earning my doctorate in Psychology, and I can’t tell you how many people
look at my business card and say, “Oh, a psychologist,
so not a real doctor.” As if it should say that on my card. (Laughter) This favoritism we show
the body over the mind, I see it everywhere. I recently was at a friends’ house, and their five-year-old
was getting ready for bed. He was standing on a stool
by the sink brushing his teeth, when he slipped, and scratched his leg
on the stool when he fell. He cried for a minute,
but then he got back up, got back on the stool
and reached out for a box of Band-Aids to put one on his cut. Now this kid could barely
tie his shoelaces, but he knew you have to cover a cut,
so it doesn’t become infected, and you have to care for your teeth
by brushing twice a day. We all know how to maintain
our physical health and how to practice dental hygiene, right? We’ve known it
since we were five years old. But what do we know about maintaining
our psychological health? Well, nothing. What do we teach our children
about emotional hygiene? Nothing. How is it we spend more time taking care our teeth
than we do our minds? Why is it our physical health
is so much more important to us than our psychological health? You know we sustain psychological injuries even more often than we do physical ones. Injuries like failure or rejection,
or loneliness, and they can also
get worse if we ignore them. And they can impact our lives
in dramatic ways. And yet, even though there are
scientifically proven techniques we could use to treat these kinds
of psychological injuries, we don’t. It doesn’t even occur to us
that we should. “Oh, you’re feeling depressed,
just shake it off, it’s all in your head.” Can you imagine saying that
to somebody with a broken leg, “Just walk it off, it’s all in your leg.” (Laughter) It is time we close the gap between
our physical and our psychological health. It’s time we made them more equal. More like twins. Speaking of which,
my brother is also a psychologist. So he’s not a real doctor, either. (Laughter) We didn’t study together, though. In fact, the hardest thing I’ve ever done
in my life is move across the Atlantic
to New York city to get my doctorate in psychology. We were apart then,
for the first time in our lives, and the separation
was brutal for both of us. But while he remained
among family and friends, I was alone in a new country. We missed each other terribly, but international phone calls
were really expensive then, and we could only afford
to speak for 5 minutes a week. When our birthday rolled around, it was the first
we wouldn’t be spending together, we decide to splurge, and that week
we would talk for ten minutes. I spent the morning pacing around my room, waiting for him to call, and waiting, and waiting, but the phone didn’t ring. Given the time difference, I assumed “OK, he’s out with friends,
he will call later.” There were no cell phones then. But he didn’t. And I began to realize,
after being away for over ten months, he no longer missed me
the way I missed him. And I knew he would call in the morning, but that night was one of the saddest
and longest nights of my life. I woke up the next morning, I glanced down at the phone, and I realized
I had kicked it off the hook when pacing the day before. I stumbled out of bed, I put the phone
back on the receiver, and it rang a second later, and it was my brother,
and, boy, was he pissed. (Laughter) It was the saddest and longest
night of his life as well. I tried to explain what happened,
but he said, “I don’t understand,
if you saw I wasn’t calling you, why didn’t you just pick up the phone
and call me?” He was right. Why didn’t I call him? I didn’t have an answer then,
but I do today, and it’s a simple one. Loneliness. Loneliness creates
a deep psychological wound. One that distorts our perceptions and scrambles our thinking, It makes us believe those around us care much less
than they actually do. It makes us really afraid to reach out, because why set yourself up
for rejection and heartache, when your heart is already aching
more than you can stand? I was in the grips of real loneliness
back then, but I was surrounded by people all day, so it never occurred to me. But loneliness, is defined purely,
subjectively. It depends solely on whether you feel emotionally or socially disconnected
from those around you. And I did. There’s a lot research on loneliness and all of it is horrifying. Loneliness won’t just make you miserable,
it will kill you. I am not kidding. Chronic loneliness increases your
likelihood of an early death by 14 percent. Fourteen percent. Loneliness causes high blood pressure,
high cholesterol, it even suppresses
the functioning of your immune system, making you vulnerable to all kinds
of illnesses and diseases. In fact, scientist have concluded
that taken together, chronic loneliness poses
a significant a risk for your longterm health and longevity
as cigarette smoking. Now, cigarette packs come with warnings
saying, “This could kill you.” But loneliness doesn’t. And that’s why it’s so important we prioritize our psychological health. That we practice emotional hygiene. Because you can’t treat
a psychological wound if you don’t even know you are injured. [Pay attention to emotional pain] Loneliness isn’t the only
psychological wound that distorts our perceptions
and misleads us. [Failure] Failure does that as well. I once visited a daycare center
where I saw three toddlers play with identical plastic toys. You had to slide the red button,
and a cute doggy would pop out. One little girl tried pulling
the purple button, then pushing it, and then she just sat back
and looked at the box with her lower lip trembling. The little boy next to her,
watched this happen, then turned to his box,
and burst into tears without even touching it. Meanwhile, another little girl
tried everything she could think of until she slid the red button, the cute doggy popped out,
and she squealed with delight. So three toddlers
with identical plastic toys but with very different
reactions to failure. The first two toddlers were perfectly
capable of sliding a red button. The only thing that prevented them
from succeeding was their mind tricked them
into believing they could not. Now, adults get tricked this way
as well all the time. In fact we all have a default set
of feelings and beliefs that gets triggered whenever
we encounter frustrations and setbacks. Are you aware of how
your mind reacts to failure? You need to be. Because if your mind tries to convince you you’re incapable of something and you believe it, then like those two toddlers,
you’ll begin to feel helpless, and you’ll stop trying too soon
or you won’t even try at all. And then you will be even more convinced
you can’t succeed. You see, that’s why so many people function below their actual potential. Because somewhere along the way,
sometimes a single failure convinced them they couldn’t succeed, and they believed it. Once we become convinced of something, it’s very difficult to change our mind. I learned that lesson the hard way. When I was a teenager with my brother. We were driving with friends
down a dark road at night, when the police car stopped us. There had been a robbery in the area,
they were looking for suspects. The officer approached the car, and he shined his flashlight
on the driver. Then on my brother in the front seat,
and then on me. And his eyes opened wide, and he said, “Where have I seen your face before?” (Laughter) And I said, “In the front seat.” (Laughter) But that made no sense to him whatsoever. So now he thought I was on drugs. (Laughter) So he drags me out of the car,
he searches me, he marches me over to the police car, and only when he verified
I don’t have a police record, could I show him I had a twin
in the front seat. But even as we were driving away,
you could see by the look on his face, he was convinced
I was getting away with something. Our mind is hard to change
once we become convinced. So it might be very natural to feel
demoralized and defeated after you fail. But you cannot allow yourself
to become convinced you can’t succeed. You have to fight
feelings of helplessness. You have to gain control
over the situation, and you have to break this kind
of negative cycle before it begins. [Stop emotional bleeding] Our minds and our feelings, they are not the trustworthy friends
we thought they were. They are more like a really moody friend, who can be totally supportive one minute,
and really unpleasant the next. I once worked with this woman who after 20 years of marriage
and an extremely ugly divorce, was finally ready for her first date. She had met this guy online,
he seemed nice and successful, and most importantly,
he seemed really into her. So she was very excited,
and she bought a new dress, and they met at an upscale
New York City bar for a drink. Ten minutes into the date,
the man stands up and says, “I’m not interested”, and walks out. [Rejection] Rejection is extremely painful. The woman was so hurt,
she could’t move. All she could do is call a friend. And here’s what the friend said,
“Well, what do you expect, you have big hips,
you have nothing interesting to say, why would a handsome,
successful man like that ever go out with a loser like you?” Shocking, right,
that a friend could be so cruel. But it would be much less shocking if I told you it wasn’t
the friend who said that. It’s what the woman said to herself. And that’s something we all do. Especially after a rejection. We all start thinking of all our faults
and all our shortcomings what we wish we were,
what we wish we weren’t, we call ourselves names. Maybe not as harshly,
but we all do it. It’s interesting that we do, because
our self-esteem is already hurting. Why would we want to go
and damage it even further? We wouldn’t make a physical injury
worse on purpose. You wouldn’t get a cut on your arm
and decide, “Oh, I know, I am going to take a knife
and see how much deeper I can make it.” But we do that with psychological injuries
all the time. Why? Because of poor emotional hygiene. Because we don’t prioritize
our psychological health. We know from dozens of studies, that when your self-esteem is lower, you are more vulnerable
to stress and to anxiety, that failures and rejections hurt more, and it takes longer to recover from them. So when you get rejected,
the first thing you should be doing is to revive your self-esteem, not join Fight Club
and beat it into a pulp. When you are in emotional pain, treat yourself with the same compassion you would expect from a truly good friend. [Protect your self-esteem] We have to catch our unhealthy
psychological habits and change them. One of the unhealthiest and most common
is called rumination. To ruminate, means to chew over. It’s when your boss yells at you, or your professor makes you
feel stupid in class, or you have a big fight with a friend, and you just can’t stop replaying
the scene in your head for days, sometimes for weeks on end. Now ruminating
about upsetting events in this way can easily become a habit,
and it’s a very costly one. Because by spending so much time focused on upsetting
and negative thoughts, you are actually putting yourself
at significant risk for developing clinical depression, alcoholism, eating disorders
and even cardiovascular disease. The problem is, the urge to ruminate can feel really strong, really important,
so it’s a difficult habit to stop. I know this for a fact. Because little over a year ago,
I developed the habit myself. You see my twin brother was diagnosed with stage III non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. His cancer was extremly aggressive, he had visible tumors all over his body. And he had to start a harsh course
of chemotherapy. And I couldn’t stop thinking
about what he was going through, I could’t stop thinking
about how much he was suffering. Even though he never complained, not once. He had this incredibly positive attitude. His psychological health was amazing. I was physically healthy,
but psychologically I was a mess. But I knew what to do. Studies tell us
that even a two minute distraction is sufficient to break the urge
to ruminate in that moment. And so each time I had a worrying,
upsetting, negative thought, I forced myself to concentrate
on something else until the urge passed. And within one week,
my whole outlook changed, and became more positive
and more hopeful. [Battle negative thinking] Nine weeks after he started chemotherapy,
my brother had a CAT scan, and I was by his side
when he got the results. All the tumors were gone. He still had three more rounds
of chemotherapy to go. But we knew he would recover. This picture was taken two weeks ago. By taking action when you’re lonely, by changing your responses to failure, by protecting yourself-esteem, by battling negative thinking, you won’t just heal
your psychological wounds, you will build emotional resilience,
you will thrive. A hundred years ago,
people began practicing personal hygiene. And life expectancy rates rose
by over fifty percent in just a matter of decades. I believe our quality of life
could rise just as dramatically if we all began practicing
emotional hygiene. Can you imagine,
what the world would be like if everyone was psychologically healthier? If there were less loneliness,
and less depression? If people knew how to overcome failure? If they felt better about themselves,
and more empowered? if they were happier, and more fulfilled? I can, because that’s the world
I want to live in, and that’s the world
my brother wants to live in as well. If you just become informed,
and change a few simple habits, well that’s the world we can all live in. Thank you very much. (Applause)

DMSO for Pain Relief and Faster Healing

DMSO for Pain Relief and Faster Healing


flashed across the medical horizon
dimethyl sulfoxide it was touted as a pain reliever which
would also work miracles on burns on acne even on spinal cord injuries are kinda
jack of all trades among drugs the medical literature was full of
stories about it some a bit pro DNS all but much of it calms skeptical even
derisive the Journal of the American Medical
Association editorialized against it and the FDA the Food and Drug
Administration refused to okay it for general use said it had never been proved effective
nonetheless two states Oregon and Florida have legalized it for
prescription and the black market in DMSO always
become nationwide that South many Americans get it meantime puzzling
story a VM asshole continues it is largely fueled by the efforts of
one man doctor stanley Jacob an associate professor of surgery at the
University of Oregon for 15 years this man some would say
this sell it has been pushing DMSO because he
believes so deeply despite the doubters in what DMSO move can do doctor Jacob
isn’t a drug that has so many delay fuses from arthritis to tennis
elbow from burns to spinal cord injuries from
mental retardation baldness isn’t a drug like that automatically suspect no question and I think that that’s one of the
reasons is having problems in if I have to do all over
again maybe a major mistake that I made my can beginning was to tell if the way it was I think if I
would have said it was good for a sprained ankle but only if
the ankle sprain were on the left side p.m. so maybe might be proof today because its use is legal in Oregon
patients make the journey to doctor jacobs of as they are almost as if it
were a domestic Laura as we’ve seen doctor jacobs create some
of his patients topical for the bruises their eggs in
flames but some others that his patience some of the most desperate our young people left paralyzed from
auto and motorcycle accidents the Z give DMSO intravenously to relieve
the pressure on their damaged brains to reduce the swelling in the brain or
spinal cord and sometimes apparently he gets dramatic results to the swelling and spine and the to me has been on the phone I’m probably
be in a chair paralyzed businessman I and so we’re in the same results another
Oregonian transplanted to Georgia swears by DMSO June Jones is second
string quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons time was he says he could hardly race is
on to throw a football he says he’d be out of the game without
DMSO my problem is a much shorter so the
simple thing for me to do that just put this on like this just
that much but it didn’t work out whatever it’s worth it already rubble all around the area so justly
with Sis so that a full before the adjustments it like that for for anywhere from 20 minutes 30 minutes 15 30 minutes and Lori it smells good forget about will move up by Mousavi
would face that’s one small special characteristic
of DMSO it smells like garlic and tastes like
oysters for the future but big black during the
game say and it was black and blue you drop
it off do this more often for Best want to ask you something to do even charlie horse yeah what do you
think the painful for today try for all right after I mean I have
anything the next day at all jones’s several of his teammates use it
too but they wouldn’t talk about it in public because it offered any drug especially
any illegal drugs is very both now in the NFL of business
availability is the most important thing in other words for the guy gets hers you could lose his job so when someone
comes to me and ask for before I give and whether I’m legally okay to do it or
not I really don’t feel refreshed resign on when Phelps perhaps more typical a bully gins who
depend on the amount so are those who suffer chronic pain family
Rudy suffered searing unrelenting pain from
arthritis for years and she could find no relief she says
until DMSO should no longer be playing the piano
without it she told they have some very very near fingers
from her three kids and the DMSO he sincere greatest
friendly for miracle drug doesn’t really curated Freddie easier said and it does
other things for her to they had a fear blister on my lip use the missile three times in the
future for us to put it away immediately it could very soon in the kitchen and sometimes think badly and views the interest-only and fee yet cuts begin to heal right away how does
DMSO work what does it do inside your body that kills pain and
helps healing doctor jacobs gave us the capsule understanding one is that get done flocks certain types of nerve conduction visit the fibers which produced pain
secondly it reduces inflammation worse following third
actually improves blood supply to an area of injury fourth and this
could be the key in the test tube in certain types of
injury it literally stimulates healing this young mothers and the sheriff
Riverside Calif suffered severe whiplash in nerve damage
in an automobile accident two years ago when we first met her last november she
was in agony no pain killer no therapy no doctor it seemed could help pain was extremely mad I was to the
point where I cried continuously I could not confirm email I did not clean I barely got myself
dressed and it’s one of the whole month they finally got to the point where they just
told me you can have to offer the weather’s gonna affect you and you
just simply going to have to live with it then she heard about the MS auld and as
a last resort Sanders urich as you can see you still very much in
pain flew to Portland Oregon to be treated by doctor jagger we went with her she received her first
dosages intervene min learn weekend you can use it means written because you because wouldn’t that be the first one if you can resisted twenty-four hours later there
was no real improvement besides you become nauseous from the
treatment and 2.5 and Fianna you know giving more mobility about the same
thinking same by the third day she was feeling a
little better you began to see it interface we didn’t
speak any medicine how long has it been since you haven’t
had to take miss over two years before he left for home doctor jacobs
showed roof where and how to apply DMSO tropical E to her neck and back now when you put it
on going for a bit too far used to apply it
to the skis enables easy literally over 40 minutes to hear from
you it will be totally drive anything like Justin my phone that was last november this is Andy sherry two months later
back at her Riverside Calif home all the pains gone the pain is totally
completely gone from Ewing at you’re serious I’m telling the truth 202
going through you can do anything can you do housework yes drive a car yes lift stuff I have not found anything I can do we asked doctor jack to come on down and take another look at
you and to talk to you and us together okay non-fiction ventures and to the lesser-known any
discomfort yen working how bout rates in and discomfort no sandy if you’re doing this three months
ago for months ago what would have happened i win pain he
wouldn’t have been able to text me all I can say is when it’s time for me
personally it worked for me two footnotes DMSO is now available for treatment of
assorted ailments in Western Europe the Soviet Union Japan and Latin America and tomorrow morning in washington the
House Committee on Aging begins an inquiry into why DMSO is not available to all
americans for any appropriate ailment including
plain and simple pain

Neck, Upper Back, Posture Pain Relief. The Towel Exercise. Upland Claremont Cucamonga Chiropractor


– Hello again, I’m Dr. Tony, Chiropractor at Euclid
Chiropractic in Upland. I wanted to go over this video with you whether you are a patient
now or a future patient. What happens when you’re
body is like this, where it’s hunching
forward, either like this, or when you sit too,
where it hunches this way. It can cause neck pain,
shoulder pain, even headaches, and upper back pain. This video will help you
understand how to get your body to relax backwards by using, I’m going to use a towel in a second, also Ms. Cassidy, her
first video, and using her to understand how to stretch properly for your neck and shoulders. Go right to the video. This is our Cassidy one of our
interns in her first video. She’s a little bit
nervous. Okay, our model. We are going to go over how
to do the pillow stretch. What you use is a towel
rolled up. A basic towel. Now what we want to have
her do is have her lie all the way down and that
will let the head fall back behind the pillow. Okay
does that feel comfortable? – No. – Good ’cause that means
your neck has come backwards and she has to work on her
neck posture for one too. After about a minute of this,
now bring your arms overhead, see how that feels. Does that feel okay? – Worse. – Worse? Phenomenal. That means she’s stretching out even more. If you have pain with this, please stop and see a chiropractor you
want to consult a chiropractor, but also you should allow the neck to fall backwards over time at that point your body
feels that over-all stretch ’cause your posture. And then you add exercise and stretching your overall body heal properly and overall get that, if
you have pain already, get that to relax doing your neck. Alright, again we’re chiropractors in Upland Cucamonga in Claremont. Allow your body to heal by
chiropractic care if you can and add stretches afterwards too. Hope you enjoyed the video. Make sure you subscribe to
our channel. Have a good day.