Rhode Island Hospital’s Outpatient Dialysis Program

Rhode Island Hospital’s Outpatient Dialysis Program


The essence of dialysis really is filtering
the blood, getting waste products that the kidneys are not normally able to get rid out
of the blood because those waste products build up and make people very ill. People
with kidney failure have, as a big problem, a lack of ability to get rid of the waste
products that we all generate, everyday in the course of normal living. When those waste
products build up, people can get ill and we need to get rid of them in some way. So,
dialysis involves a system where fluid runs through a filter, runs past patients’ blood,
and substances in the blood, that are dangerous or hazardous, got transferred from the blood
into this fluid, which is flowing past the blood and then get excreted. Dialysis in the
state continues to make a tremendous difference for the lives of about a thousand people in
our state who have chronic kidney disease. We started our program in 2009, October 2009,
and we currently have about 85 patients in both centers, with the center on Chapman Street
and our center right her in East Providence. It’s our presence on the East Bay, so we hope
to make that easy for our patients who live in the East Bay and in southeastern Massachusetts,
as well to use this facility. People shouldn’t have difficulty getting here or parking here.
It’s a beautiful, beautiful facility, as you can see here. It’s nice and airy and light.
Gets lots of natural light in, which I think makes people, uh, makes people feel better.
And again, here, we offer in center dialysis and offer the opportunity for patients to
choose the other types if dialysis, as well, home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis
by using our facility at Chapman Street at the same time. We have 12 bays here in East
Providence and in Chapman Street, we have 18 bays. At Chapman Street, we offer dialysis
till about 10 o’clock at night for people who will go to school, people who work during
the day. So about one third of the patients get dial is starting at about 5 o’clock at
night and go to about 10:00 at night, as well. We have televisions available. Patients have
cable. They can look at television during the treatment. This is Wi-Fi accessible, so
that people can bring their laptops in, surf the internet, do email through their work,
etc. when they’re here. The cartridges that we use, which are right here, are made of
material that actually is much more compatible with patient’s blood so people don’t get reactions
to it. The machines allow a very rapid blood flow, so that makes the treatment very efficient
and can sometimes shorten the treatment. The dialysate, which is specially processed water
that we use that the patient’s waste products go into and the patient’s are exposed to,
is now very very closely monitored, kept bacteria free. The machines, themselves, are automated
and can pick up any problems that may occur during the dialysis treatment. The machines
don’t let us take too much fluid off, for example. They closely monitor that and the
machines kind of serve as a medical record to also tell us about how the treatment’s
been going. We have a multidisciplinary approach her and many people are involved in a patient’s
care. The most important, by far and away, is the patient, him or herself, who sits absolutely
at the center of our care plans and of our care, surrounding the patient, our physicians,
and nephrologists, interventional radiologists, transplant surgeons, general surgeons, trained
specialized nephrology nurses, dialysis technicians, social workers, and dieticians, who have a
special training and expertise and the care of people with kidney disease. But again,
the most important member of that team, by far, is the patient.

How To Build A Hospital

How To Build A Hospital


In Western Sydney, healthcare needs are evolving as our population grows and ages and people live longer. We’re transforming the way we deliver healthcare, and the role that hospitals play in our community to embrace emerging technologies and changing community expectations. Here at Westmead, we are part of the most exciting redevelopment of a health precinct in Australia. There’s a lot happening and we want to share with you all the work that goes into building the first part of our Redevelopment – a new hospital building. How do you build a hospital? First comes the planning. Then comes the building. The planning can take several years, as there’s a lot to consider. We care about our patients and the community and we have to ask ourselves some big questions. How can we help people to be healthy over the next 50 years? How can we better integrate our world-class research and education? How can we design and building infrastructure for the future? What does world-class clinical care look like for the next generation? To answer these questions we have to know what our health needs are now and how they will change in the future. We have to look at new ways of working. We have to develop the right models of care for our
patients. To do all of this we speak to our staff, patients, carers and our community. This is all done through project user groups called PUGs. PUGs work closely with patients, carers and architects. They take all the questions that we asked ourselves and the answers to design the new hospital building. PUGs are used at every stage of the hospital development. Find out who your PUG representative is and how to get involved. We really want to hear from you. So what does a PUG work on first? They develop a Functional Brief. The Functional Brief tells the planners how you work, how you deliver healthcare and how your department works with other areas of the hospital. This phase also sees us work out how other important services interact with clinical service delivery, like education and
research. A big focus is on innovation and finding a better way to do things. The next phase is Concept Design and this is where it gets really exciting. We get to start looking at drawings and pictures of the building, its size and location. From there we look at flow – how the patients and services, as well as staff, will move throughout the building and even how information travels between departments and across the precinct as a whole. But we go even further and look at how the precinct is going to interact with the transportation networks of the city and the surrounding areas. We have to test this again and again to get it right, even going back to the Functional Briefs and the Concept Design to make sure we’re holding true. That’s when we move to Schematic Design. It includes detailed architectural plans and layout for each floor, and it is at that time we have to do the budget planning to make sure that we stay on budget and meet our priorities. Then are ready for Detailed Design. This literally gives us the nuts and bolts of the new building – right down to the power points and the furniture. This is the plan the builder uses to create our new building. While the design is finalised by the Local Health District and the project team, through the tender and construction process, we must focus on transitioning into the new building. . You will often hear this referred to as Commissioning. There is Building Commissioning, where the project team ensure things like electricity, IT and air-conditioning are working. We must focus on Operational Commissioning. Our tools of the trade may have moved, departments that we may connect with may be further away or closer, and new technologies may be in our workplace. We must adapt to new ways of working and we must do that now. And that’s how you building a hospital. The planning alone can take over a year. We use the time between now and the opening of the new to introduce new models of care, to test new processes and procedures, to get used to doing things differently before we make the move, and to work out how we stay connected with with teams and services in the existing buildings. You’ll be hearing plenty from the project team because it’s a long and important journey that we are on. You see we’re not just building a hospital, we’re building new services, new networks of care and better ways of doing things. We’re building health and we’re transforming lives.

Milk May Not Protect Against Fractures, Death

Milk May Not Protect Against Fractures, Death


Past research and advertising campaigns suggested
that milk made bones stronger and improved overall health. But new research suggests
that may not be true. I’m Erin White with your latest health news. The authors of a new study found drinking
milk is not tied to a reduced risk for bone fracture or death. In fact, high milk intake
might increase those risks. Despite these findings, the study authors said more research
on the topic is needed before health officials can make any concrete dietary recommendations
about milk intake. Speak with a doctor about your daily dairy
intake.

CCHU9022 Journey into Madness: Conceptions of Mental Health and Mental Illness (Trailer)

CCHU9022 Journey into Madness: Conceptions of Mental Health and Mental Illness (Trailer)


Many of us are health conscious. Mental health is part of our overall health, but people’s understanding of mental health and mental illness is still very limited. A lack of understanding about mental health can lead to poor help-seeking intention and worse come to worse, people kill themselves because of untreated mental illnesses. This course aims to reveal what mental health and mental illness is all about and to rectify some of our common misunderstanding about mental disorders. You may wish to know more about mental illness so that you can help yourself and others in the future. But let me put this up front. This course is not about introduction of psychotherapies nor an introduction of abnormal psychology. It is not just about signs and symptoms of mental illness. At the same time, you are not expected to reproduce a list of evidence-based approaches to prevent and intervene mental illnesses. Instead, you will be developing a critical and comprehensive understanding of mental illness and mental health in our contemporary society with the use of experiential learning activities, case studies and multimedia materials. You will be led through the journey on a number of mental health issues in our daily lives as the number of people with mental illness increases, you will have a lot of chances to meet them in your social circles, workplace or even family. I hope that at the end of this course, you will have a more comprehensive understanding of mental health from multiple perspectives, how mental health affect us as individuals, family and community, and how is mental illness perceive across different cultures. I look forward to seeing you again soon.

How a wrist fracture is treated

How a wrist fracture is treated


This animation shows what can happen when
someone fractures their wrist, and how a fractured wrist is treated. Click the navigation arrows
below the animation screen to play, pause, rewind or fast-forward the animation. This
animation contains sound. Your body is protected and supported by a framework of bone called
your skeleton. Your bones are very strong. They have three main parts: compact bone on
the outside, spongy bone on the inside and bone marrow, right at the centre. Your bones
also have a nerve and blood supply. The structure of bone makes it very tough. A bone will only
break if it’s put under a lot of force or twisted awkwardly. A broken bone is said to
be fractured. Fractures are painful because bone has a nerve and blood supply. If you
trip, you usually break your fall by outstretching your hands. This puts a lot of pressure on
the wrist bone which may cause it to fracture. Here we show the forces that are acting on
the wrist bone when it hits the ground to break your fall. There are many different
types of fractures. A common type is a fracture of the wrist called a Colles’ fracture. This
type is usually caused by tripping over with the arms stretched out to break a fall. Here
we show what the broken bone looks like in a Colles’ fracture. The two edges of the bone
have moved out of line. Colles’ fractures are most common in women over 50. People who
have weakened bones due to osteoporosis are more likely to break their wrist when they
fall. Once the wrist bone has been fractured, it may be out of line. If this isn’t corrected,
the wrist will heal in the wrong position. If the two pieces of bone have been displaced,
they need to be repositioned so that they are lined up correctly. This is known as reduction.
This can be achieved by pulling on the hand, then manipulating the wrist and hand. The
bone is now lined up so it will heal in the same shape as before the fracture. Your doctor
will put a plaster cast around your arm to fix it in the correct position and support
the bone while it’s healing. This is the end of the animation. Click on the animation screen
to watch it again.

If You Have a Metatarsal Stress Fracture… WATCH THIS

If You Have a Metatarsal Stress Fracture… WATCH THIS


In this video, I’m going to show you some
great exercises to get your body ready to run again after a Metatarsal stress fracture. So you’ve been told that the foot pain you’re
suffering with is a metatarsal stress fracture. This is one of those injuries that I can unfortunately
speak about from personal experience. I can definitely confirm that this isn’t an injury
you can run through! As you’ve no-doubt been told, resting the
foot is hugely important to allow the the bone tissue to heal properly. However it’s important to remember that
while you’re resting the foot, there’s still loads you can do in terms of exercise. With the right rehab plan we can make sure
that when the time comes, you’re ready to get back to running stronger than ever. After all… it’s the foot we’re trying
to rest. As long as we’re careful to protect the foot there’s still the other 95% of
the body that we can work on! I’ve actually created a free downloadable
Metatarsal Stress Fracture rehab guide to go alongside this video with a series of bonus
exercises and rehab progressions. I’ll leave the link in the description of this video
– be sure to check it out Now, let’s take a look at the various different
phases of metatarsal stress fracture rehab and check-out a few of the key exercises you
can be working on at each stage… Ok so during this early stage of your injury,
we of course have to protect the foot from undue loading and stress while the bone begins
to heal. Whether you’re in a protective boot or not,
the this period of time where you’re not using the foot normally can have consequences for
areas higher up the body, such as the hips and the low back. While you can’t load the foot too much at
this point, you can still promote good movement throughout the rest of your body. Here are a couple of hip and back mobility
exercises you can work on without damaging your foot. Start on all fours. From there, take one knee
and bring it forwards towards your elbow. From there bring the knee out to the side
and straighten the leg backward from the hip. Repeat this circular movement ten times, then
reverse the movement. Aim for three sets of ten on each side. Laying on your front, reach your left foot
and leg back and across your body to touch the ground on the right of your body. You’ll feel your glutes and low back working
as you extend the hip through movement. You’ll also be getting a great stretch through the
front of the hip. Repeat this on your right and left alternately,
and aim for three sets of 10. In the same way, while you’re not using the
foot normally, sometimes the ankle and foot it self can get a little stiff. This simple a-to-z exercise where you ‘write’
the letters of the alphabet with your toes gives your foot and ankle a thorough workout
in all planes of motion. When your Physio gives you the go ahead to
begin gradually loading the foot again, any exercise where we work on balance and stability
is a great option… just as long as nothing you do causes your foot pain. This single leg toe touch exercise is one
of my favourite balance and single leg stability exercises for runners! It’s so simple yet
so effective… Standing on one leg, maintain your balance
as you keep your back straight and pivot forwards from the hips. Reach down to touch your big
toe with your opposite hand, then stand up straight again. Of course it’s not just about the foot…
As I mentioned regarding mobility, we also need to address the hips when it comes to
keeping important muscles such as the glute complex in good functional condition. I really like this variation on a step-up
exercise where we add a resistance band just below the knee to force you to work harder
through those all-important abductor and external rotator muscles of the hip, such as glute
med and upper glute max. Keep the movement slow and deliberate while
stepping back and forth over a step for three sets of 1 minute When it comes to gradually returning to running,
there are also a number of exercises you can work on to build strength around the foot,
ankle and lower legs. When the time comes to resume running gradually,
your Physio should give you an appropriate return to running programme so that you can
gradually increase the cumulative stress on the injured metatarsal. Alongside the running programme you should
also ask your Physio about exercises you can use to compliment running in gradually reintroducing
the loading. Exercises such as heel and toe walking are
great for building strength and endurance in the muscles around the ankles. Jumping rope and jumping on its on are both
great low level ploy strict drills which will help you condition the low legs, feet and
ankles for running. As with the obvious progression – hopping – care should be taken in performing
these post metatarsal stress fracture. Little and often is the way forwards with these exercises,
so as to not overload the bone tissue as it remodels. I usually find that 5 X 20sec bouts of an
exercise like jumping rope is an adequate training load to begin with. Not too much,
but enough to have an effect. If you’re unsure, please always check with
your Physio. Best of luck with your rehab, and don’t
forget to check the link in the description to pick-up your free metatarsal stress fracture
rehab guide.

Comparing Risks: Hip Fracture vs. Total Hip Replacement


Like all surgery, hip surgery has risks. But
there may be some important differences between the risks for hip fracture surgery versus
total hip replacement. I’m Rachelle Grossman with your latest health news. A new study
compared patients and found that those with hip fractures tended to be older, have other
medical conditions, and were at a higher risk of death. When a patient breaks a hip, surgery
is usually needed to help the fracture heal. In a total hip replacement, the damaged bone
is removed and the hip joint is replaced by a prosthesis. Previous research found that
patients undergoing a total hip replacement are generally younger and healthier. Their
risk of death was only point-3 percent, while the risk of death for people undergoing hip
fracture surgery was 1-point-8 percent. In addition, patients having hip fracture surgery
were also much more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit. Experts say that
because a hip fracture may cause pain, bleeding and immobility, they may also face an increased
likelihood of complications like heart attack, pneumonia and stroke.