Should I Accept the Insurer’s First Offer in a Personal Injury Claim?

Should I Accept the Insurer’s First Offer in a Personal Injury Claim?


Hi my name is Christian Foyle, and I’m
the director of Foyle Legal, today’s topic is should I accept the first offer that
is made to me regarding a personal injury claim by the insurer In most cases the answer is no in this
area of law. insurers typically lowball you with a
low offer at the start of your claim, you should seek advice from a personal
injury lawyer before looking to accept an offer. Foyle Legal specialise in the
area of personal injury law, you can contact us on zero four zero eight seven
two seven three four three by email at [email protected] or
through our website foylelegal.com

Back Massage Therapy How to for Sciatica Pain Relief Treatment, Cranio-Sacral Techniques


Greetings again! This is Athena Jezik. We’re gonna work on some more videos and explain
some things out. Sciatica seems to be a problem that many
many people suffer from so i thought i would go through a little bit more sciatica work and explanation on how i deal with
sciatica. There’s many different techniques that people have but for me
this has been the most effective and i’m also learning that there’s
different types of things that come from that area. Sciatica usually is pain coming from
about here. When it’s real bad it will run down the leg. It’s a nerve pain so it runs as though it’s a like a hot iron or a hot rod going down the leg. Very uncomfortable. Sometimes there’s pain though in other parts of the hip which isn’t really the classic sciatica but it does still involve things similar because there’s so many nerves that come out of this sacral area. So that’s another thing that i’ve been
discovering. So not everything that happens with the pain and going down the leg is maybe the classic sciatica but it doesn’t matter because in my opinion naming a lot of things
doesn’t really do anything except for make it a disease and then a disease is only by law treatable by the western medical people. So that’s just names and labels. The thing is
we want to get people out of pain. We want to move them into a space of
being able to function well. So in that pain area of the hip impinging nerves and creating bad
sensation or pain down the leg we’ll call that the sciatica pain and of course it comes from here
and I find that it is always got a direct connection to the
positioning of the sacrum that also has a direct connection to the
position of the sphenoid bone at the occipital base and I’m gonna show you a little bit of this… I’ll just show it to you now. Excuse me it’s early in the morning and I’m kind of foggy today. So the sacrum is sitting here and in that sacral bone there is a lot of nerves that come out from here. These little holes are where they come
out of so if that is position a little bit
crooked on there, which happens quite a bit then we’re gonna have this pressure. The nerves are not going to be coming
out with the proper alignment and the nerves are gonna have pressure on them when they are twisted a little bit. sometimes this bone can be in a
position that’s a little more like this or it can also be an a combination of
that particular pattern so it’s important to be able to allow this bone to be able to lengthen down. This is something better done if the body can do it itself. If it’s forced into it, it doesn’t always mean that it’s going to hold because there’s a bunch of stuff
underneath there. The network of the facial structure,
the membranes under that that will twist like a nylon stocking and so if it’s forced back it will go back but because of the
underlying structures there it will pull it back into that odd position. This is translating up into the head and
because I’m a cranial sacral therapist and I’ve been doing it for so many
years I have a lot of understanding how these connections are made. So right in there where the purple and the yellow come
together is the sphenobasilar junction. The sphenoid bone is the yellow bone right here and so that bone touches all the other
bones and it does relate directly to the sacrum at this joint. So if this sacral structure is sideways, crooked on there, that’s going to be placed and it’s going to be
like so The same thing is gonna happen at at the head.
This sphenoid bone is going to be out in a similar manner because it’s a counterbalance for what’s
going on with the body. So it keeps things balanced so that we feel somewhat straight. So that’s areas that I look for in work around low back pain particularly down in the sacral area. I do not like to do the hard pushing with the elbow. For one thing You can get through muscles that way but your elbows are not very sensitive as to what you’re really doing and what structures
you’re on and i have found that when i’ve tried to
work elbows even forearms the bones and the bony surfaces.. it’s just too rough.
I don’t feel good about it. It doesn’t feel productive so I don’t
use that method. Also sometimes when the nerve is affected there’s inflammation. So in
my opinion the way that I see things is by driving yourself into that nerve, through those muscles with a bunch
of inflammation going on is not really going to help the problem. So there’s little things like that that I pay attention to that I don’t know if many other people take a lot of
that into account because we do get sort of a technique
to loosen things up and it doesn’t always provide for us the thoughts of what’s
happening at the subtle anatomy level. So I test this just by checking at
the occipital base and at the sacrum to see the position of everything and once the position is established then I can go in and work with the sacrum
in order to correct it. Sometimes this will be corrected quickly
and sometimes it’s not corrected as quickly and I believe that a lot of that is
because it’s maybe not a true quote “sciatica” but there’s other
stuff going on maybe in the hip joint. There might be some kind of misalignment
in the pubic arch. There might be some kind of a rotation in the hip as well so other things have to happen. So here I’m just giving a little drag on the sacrum and letting it loosen up and letting it
swim around and my other hand is at the occipital base. Just steadying the dural tube. And so there I just wait a little while and then I will soften the muscle area around
there. I work really differently. It just kind of depends. So much of my work is intuitive. There’s
somewhat of a protocol that I follow but each person presents things
differently. No two bodies are ever the same. No injury patterns are ever the same. So flexibility is important to be able
to move from various techniques and not follow things too rigidly particularly in pain
problems and issues Then the other thing that i will do is
to get my finger at the base of the sacrum… Excuse me, at L5 S1, which is right in this area here L5 S1 so try to put some distance between there
because that’s where the jamming probably tends to be. Sometimes it’s at the coccyx. And I’ll show you that technique as well. So with that you just do a little
stretching integrating in with the muscles integrating in with the tissues and then just waiting for it to move. This is going face down. There is a better way to do the sacral pull when they are on their back but this way will also open it up. Either way is fine and my other hand
up here is also feeling some rotation and some movement coming up the spine. So as one area of the spine is off every
little vertebrae is affected to some degree. There’s a little bit of adjustment that they
have to make in order to keep the misalignment aligned and the bodies just gonna do that it’s
gonna work within the framework that it has and it’s gonna normalize whether a pattern
is there. And so there now we’re getting it softened
and now there’s a little bit of a stretch happening. I’m stretching downward with the hand
that’s on the L5 S1. And I am taking a little bit of a stretch upward. Just a little traction. No deeper than the fascial level. So we have skin, fluid, then fascia. So I’m three layers down and giving a little stretch there and i’m feeling quite a bit of rumbling
going on and there is a separation happening between L5 S1 And it just swims around and the sacrum is trying right now to find its way back to the proper position. It’s a good idea, if you know cranial
work to also balance it at the spenoid level because the sphenoid bone, if not corrected, can pull this thing out. Sometimes this
will correct the sphenoid bone but it’s a good idea to check both. She just had a couple pulses. There’s
a lot of activity going on. Even though she’s not suffering from sciatica or any kind of hip serious pain problems there’s still a
lot of activity going on, which is correcting little misalignments in there, which is a reason that we should be paying attention to maintenance. Even though we’re not hurting, we might
wanna have some kind of session just for tweaking. I see a number of people who come in regularly every four to six weeks just to be
tweaked with cranial work And I myself have an hour and a half
session with somebody once a month. And I love it when I get it. It took me a while to find somebody that I felt was at my capacity. Okay and then the other position is just
to lay the hand on the sacrum here and curl the fingers at L5 S1
and give a little bit of traction this way. This is a little tricky because you have
to keep the palm of the hand pretty secure and the fingers have to bend so there’s quite a lot of technique in the hands in order to get the right feeling. And the
hands have to work independently because I’m right at the sacral coccyx junction and I’m stretching
downward on that while I’m allowing the movement, which is a little
bit of a swaying motion at L5 S1.
There’s a downward traction as well as this being loose to be able to align. at the same time it’s being tractioned downward. Okay and there’s some movement happening. These techniques will usually give quite a
bit of change to the pain. It doesn’t mean that one time is going
to give total remedy to the problem but it does begin to correct that space. Once that’s corrected then we can go in
and also work into the muscles, much deeper into the musculature. And the only reason i work into the
musculature is to loosen the muscles so that they’re not sinching down around those
nerves because if they are sinching around those nerves then they are not gonna let go really easy even though the
alignment happens so i just worked really deeply into these glutial muscles for the purpose of the muscle again, not the purpose of the nerve. And I’m careful if I go into the
area where the sciatic is the main place where you can feel it. I do not go into that with a lot of
deep pressure because again I don’t like going into the inflamed areas and I don’t like going
into pain with a lot of pressure. I don’t think in my work it gives me the better results. Okay and then up front and there is many areas of the hip to take and loosen. And along the ridge of the hip as well coming from the sacrum. Working all that. And of course both sides are benefited. I won’t do too much on this side. Both sides have benefited by that. You can even go into the attachments of
the hamstrings. In fact it’s a good idea to make sure
that the quadriceps and hamstrings are well stretched. With this there’s also
some stretches that can be done with the leg, but I will show that at another time So basically what i do is corrected the position of the sacrum to alleviate the pain of the sciatic pain or hip pain. Thank you very much! This is Athena Jezik. Please subscribe to our channel and you should also visit our new website because we have over 1300 videos on our channel I know it can be a little difficult to navigate and find the videos that you want to see
but if you visit us at Psychetruth.net you’ll be able to find the videos you want to see and watch them there. So we encourage you to go to Psychetruth next time you want
to search for something and we look forward to seeing you again soon!

Patching a hole in my Ghost Whisperer! How to repair torn technical fabrics with Tenacious tape!

Patching a hole in my Ghost Whisperer! How to repair torn technical fabrics with Tenacious tape!


you know how things tend to happen at
the most inopportune times and you’re least expecting it right well outside
playing with the dogs and I got my Ghost Whisperer when wanda jumped up and her
claws snagged on my jacket we ripped a hole in it so let’s go inside we’re back
inside I’m gonna get this jacket fixed up you guys are new to my channel my
name is Madi welcome to Madi Oh doors I challenge all about hiking and
backpacking I’m in a hammock camping I’m Canadian I go to some wicked places in
the Rockies if that interests you consider clicking on a subscribe button
well let’s get into it let’s get this hold my jacket fake stuff cuz this is
driving me nuts first thing I’m gonna take my jacket off a little close up a
lovely hole that Wanda has caused in my jacket
awesome so first thing I’m gonna do is I want to get that down pushed back inside
before I actually patch it so what I’m going to use is I’m just gonna use one
of my titanium Sheppard hook tent stakes this is honestly this is how I have
fixed my jacket in the field a couple times I’ve had issues like this before
happened so I’m just gonna use that to basically just to push the down inside
kind of like I’m trying to push it in away from the hole so that when I put
the patch on the patch is gonna stick to the fabric and not the down all right
you got that now we grab our tenacious tape and to fix up my jacket we’re gonna
use gear aid tenacious tape this is the clear version this stuff is basically
just uh it’s kind of just an all-purpose nylon repair tape works really good for
any of your technical fabrics you pick this stuff up on Amazon whatever I’ll
put some links in the description down below for you guys so what I’m gonna do
it’s basically gonna take this cut off a square we’re gonna patch a jacket with
that there’s a little square tenacious tape let’s get the jacket out past this
alright so we got the jacket down and if you can see a little hole is right here
and also will tough to see in the black fabric button so we’ve got all the down pushed inside
it’s all I’m going to do is take my little strip of tenacious tape peel the
backing piece off literally just slap this guy right over top of that hole
press it on there there it is it is new now you can see it when it’s up close
but like honestly to me I personally don’t really care this is a backpacking
jacket I mean I wear this thing I would devote all the time but I personally
don’t care if there’s patches on it I know if you really really wanted to and
you really cared you could trim up the edges on this and make it a nicer little
patch but I have found in my experience having a little bit more surface area on
the outside of the hole helps this stuff stay on more I have had this stuff peel
off if you don’t have enough covering the hole I know some people like to cut
this out like it’s just like a perfect little circle to cover the hole with
like you know a millimeter of coverage around the edge and it looks nice but it
does not hold so you want to make sure you’ve got enough coverage on the
outside of this thing so there it is guys and gals patching up technical
fabrics it’s how I pack up my Ghost Whisperer
jacket I mean you guys see the sleeves on this thing I got a couple patches all
over the place I have I blown holes in this thing a couple times over the years
it happens this tenacious tape stuff also fantastic for patching any of your
technical fabrics it’s good for patching up packs I mean I know you can patch
hammocks and stuff with this kind of with this stuff I know people patch
tarps with this this stuff is fantastic to have in my first-aid kit I carry a
little chunk of this that’s about that long you know like a little I don’t know
but 3×3 kind of square of this stuff just for if I have any field repairs to
do and then this is just the leftover that I keep it home for doing any kind
of patches I can do at home so uh I’ll put a link in the description box down
below for you guys if you guys are interested in grabbing some tenacious
tape for yourself I do highly recommend it it’s super cheap super effective like
the the patch on this jacket alone is gonna last longer than the jacket
material itself so you know if you guys are worried about picking up some of
these higher-end jackets with the the more delicate UL fabrics grab yourself a
little bit of tenacious tape know you’re gonna be able to patch it
sleeping bags jack is packs whatever you need to with this stuff fantastic to
have so if you guys thought if you guys found value in this video a special
thumbs up let me know you have any questions put them in the comment
section down below I would love to help you guys out if I can and there’s always
guys I Hammadi thank you guys so much for watching and you guys know that I
will see you guys on the next one

First Aid Myth Debunked: Seizure

First Aid Myth Debunked: Seizure


Eh bro, you posing posing is it What happened?! Help these guys having a seizure! Eh bro, you really know what to do? Not your phone! A rock?! A spoon? Alamak! Not your shoe! First Aid Myth: debunked – seizure Call 995 Monitor casualty until fit stops put casualty to the recovery position Hand him over to the ambulance Have you ever had to administer first aid to someone? Let us know in the comments below

This is How to Make Content that Matters


– Hi, I’m Daniel Foster,
I work at TechSmith. And I wanna share today
with you some ideas that I’ve been sharing
with a lot of groups around the country and
even internationally. First off, who is TechSmith? We’re the makers of Snagit and Camtasia. And these are tools for creating
images, GIFs, and videos. And if you’re in technical
communication as a field, you’re probably already
familiar with these products. Content Wrangler, which
does a benchmarking survey every couple of years, recently showed that Snagit’s number one and Camtasia’s number eight
among all the software tools that technical communicators
have in their toolbox. And one of the things I get
to do as a strategy lead is help set the direction for Snagit. And so to do that I’m talking
to a lot of practitioners, a lot of folks that are actually in the trenches making content. And one of the themes that I hear a lot is that even though the tools and the ability to make visuals has gotten more and more
accessible to more people, they still struggle on their teams with this tension between
text-only content or visuals. And so it ends up sometimes
looking like this wall of text. And why is that? Well, that’s because there’s a perception that it’s much easier to just create and localize and update and
maintain text-only documents. And I wanna say to you
today, don’t settle. We don’t have to settle for that because I think there’s a
way out of this tension, and that’s what I wanna talk about today. So, really, there’s two main takeaways that I wanna leave you with after we walk through this content. And the first is that visuals do matter, and I’m gonna share some
original research that we did that helps establish that fact. And second, I wanna give you
some ideas and inspiration for how you can get creative
to escape this tension between, yeah, I wanna have visuals in my content, but it’s expensive and difficult
to do, is there a solution? And I wanna talk about
one potential solution and kind of creative approach
that we’re seeing out there that technical communicators are adopting. So, first of, this is totally
a fair question to ask, is do visuals even matter? Does it matter if my content is just text or if it contains these visual elements? Well, we felt like there wasn’t really a great answer out there. There wasn’t a lot of
good research on this that felt credible. And so what we did is we
hired an independent firm to tackle this in a research project so that we could answer that question. Before I get to the findings, though, I’ll just give you a quick
outline of the methodology. So, we kinda had three
stages to the research. One was about preference,
what do people prefer. So, opinion poll, a
pretty broad opinion poll that was global in scope. And the next stage was
actually going in to a lab in an observational experiment, having people perform different tasks and then seeing their time on task and how efficient and effective they were. And then a third was
some economic modeling to see what would that look like in terms of economic
indicators and significance. So, with the first section,
what we really found is that people do have a marked preference for visuals in their communication, in the technical things that they use to learn new technologies
or new processes at work. But most work places actually
fail at delivering this. A lot of the content is
just sort of a wall of text. So, particularly among millennials, this was a very marked preference. That folks really prefer
to have images, videos, even animated GIFs in their
content rather than text only. And millennials are a growing percentage of your coworkers, your colleagues, and your customers, which
is really important. So they’re not just a small
group at this stage anymore. Millennials are really the
dominant group in the workforce and becoming more so. And so let me think about
why this preference matters. Oh, and actually, this slide shows that that preference actually
extends beyond millennials. It is in the broader
workplace population as well. People have a marked preference
for video and images. But why does this matter? Well, to your customers,
if you think about it, your audience or your
customers has choices. And so they can Google
and find other content that’s not your content
to answer their questions. And if what comes up
in those Google results is videos from some third party or just somebody who thinks
they know your product, maybe it’s quality, maybe
it’s accurate, maybe it’s not. So you kind of lose control and you’re not really in that
conversation at that point. Also, there’s a perception issue, right? So if people have a marked
preference for visual content and they’re not finding that
content from your brand, it kinda reflects poorly on your brand. Your brand ends up looking a
little bit stale or obsolete and unengaging in ways you
don’t wanna have that reflection or shade on your brand. So, the second main finding
from our research was that visuals actually help
people perform tasks better. And so we did, like I said,
we did an observational study, and so we had people perform
various technical tasks. We’ll link to the full study so you can kind of dig in and
see all the research yourself. But what we found is that there was an important significant increase in the ability to complete these tasks when people had visuals in their content. About 7% was kind of the lift there. And people also felt
like they could remember the tasks’ instructions better if they had more visual content to them. So, after they walk away, that
means that they’re not having to ask again or search again or contact your support center again to remember how to do this. So, retention is important. And finally, task completion. Just being able to literally
complete the task accurately. There was a good lift
that we found there too. So, really, just to recap, it’s important to include visuals for these two reasons
that we’ve talked about. One, preference, and
two, execution of tasks. People are actually more
effective at technical tasks when they have some
visual support in there. And then third, we kinda wanted to do an economic modeling exercise. So, the third part of the research was actually taking some of
these productivity outcomes and saying, what happens if you
model those out economically using things like GDP
and productivity numbers? What would that mean to companies in terms of gain productivity? So, when we looked at the numbers, you’d say, okay, well, people
pick up maybe six minutes a week, or per day, sorry, if they have visuals in their content and they’re able to execute
their tasks more efficiently. And then you multiply that out to a week. It’s about 33 minutes per week. Or over the course of a full year, it’s something like 25 hours. And all of that just to say that these kind of things do matter. They matter to your business and they matter to your customers and how effectively they can do the kind of jobs that
they’re trying to do. And this was a great summary quote from the actual researcher
who did this project for us. And really it’s pointing out
that this is not going away, this is a trend. There’s going to be more
expectation by people and more demand for visual content because all the rest
of all the information and content that they’re
consuming elsewhere is visual. So that’s the way things are going that’s not likely to reverse. So, all that to say visuals matter. And we’ve talked about
that from a preference, from an actual task efficiency standpoint, and then from these
economic kind of factors. But in reality, a lot of
us have a lot of challenges as technical communicators. And these are things like, how do I update my visuals in my content every time my UI changes? So, for many people, the product or service that they work on might ship updates frequently. A few times a year, maybe
even a few times a week. So that can create a lot
of challenge with churn. Maybe you localize your content
into multiple languages, and that can be a challenge when you think about the visual component. Maybe you have to support many different versions or platforms, so that puts a stress on content teams. Maybe your UI of your product is just, it feels clunky, not modern. It’s just not beautiful and it comes across as
kind of an eye chart when you put it in your documentation. And then there’s these niche
problems that we’ll hear about, like I have a cloud product I support and unfortunately I can’t easily get at a dummy instance with dummy data that’s already populated
to make it look real, to make it look like it’s
the real live instance. So, as technical communicators, you may encounter some of these problems. And one of the things I love doing is looking across different domains and different disciplines and saying, how are other people
solving these problems? And a few years ago I started seeing a lot of content that
looks kind of like this. So, it’s basically
wireframe-looking content. And usually it came from marketers. And it would be sort of a suggestion or an abstracted version of a screenshot that would be in some of
this marketing material. So, it started to make me think about, why are they doing this,
what’s the benefit of that? Besides being eye-catching, is there some other benefit there? And then you started to
see this kind of content, this simplified graphic, also work its way into things
like in-product onboarding. The little animations or the static images that show up in a product that are explaining some of the
functionality or the how to. Or in what’s new content
or in release notes. And then we’d see it work
its way into documentation. So, this example is from Google, and you can see here that they
have the exact same images in their English and their French and their Japanese articles, and of course they support
like 20 other languages, so it’s in those as well. So, it’s kind of like,
what’s going on here? Why are folks doing this
and what is this trend? We cast about for what an established name would be for this, ’cause it’s easier to talk
about something if it has name, and there wasn’t really
an established name. So we coined the term
simplified user interface, or SUI for short. It’s also really fun to say, SUI. But it’s really this idea
that you’ve abstracted out any irrelevant or distracting
details from an image and what you’ve left is
the key important pieces. And so this is what that can look like. Here’s a quick before and after. So, what you see on the left is just a screenshot of a service
that I use called Calendly. It’s really great for
scheduling customer calls, is what I use it for. But anyway, the interface, you can see that a typical screenshot you’d have all the detail. And then on the other side what you see is this suified or simplified treatment where you’ve really abstracted
out a lot of that detail. And you might think, well,
can people actually recognize what the product or interface is? It turns out you can. So, if you look at this one, it’s pretty obvious what this is when you stop and think about it a second. This is Finder or Explorer
on Mac and Windows. And here’s another example,
which is YouTube, right? You kinda look at it and see right away, oh yeah, that’s YouTube. Even though there’s no text and everything is very abstracted. And one more example, this is the one we spend a lot of our time in day to day, and of course it’s Outlook. So you kind of can get
the sense from the layout and from the basic colors of what that original interface was. So, great, that’s good. But then as a technical communicator you’re probably asking yourself, okay, but I still need
people to follow steps. The point for the graphics
is not just to look pretty, but it’s to show you where
in the interface to click. So where is the value for
a technical communicator? So, let’s take another example. This one is a very just typical menu. And what you’ll see here is that, when you step back and really
look at it with fresh eyes, there’s a bunch of stuff in
here that’s not important for showing the two steps, which is click File, click
Connect Mobile Device. That’s really the point of this graphic, and yet there’s a ton of
extraneous information. So let’s abstract that out and you can see how much easier it is to really just follow along and say, oh, File, Connect Mobile Device. That’s the two main things I need to know. Got it right there, very
visual, very front and center. Of course you’re gonna wanna
pair that with some text, and the text on the side is gonna say, “Here are the steps,” and
a little bit of context. But when you pair those together, this simplified graphic and that text, it’s a very powerful way
to convey the information. So, what we just saw is that this simplified graphic approach actually helps focus
the viewers’ attention on what’s most important, which boosts your content effectiveness. But it has some nice side benefits for technical teams as well. So, one is that it’s gonna
help future-proof your content. So every time your interface changes, small changes to the interface, incremental things that
happen on an ongoing basis, you don’t have to go back and revise all of your screenshots again, because a lot of that detail
has been abstracted out. So there’s big cost savings there. Localization. If you localize, you
may be able to get away with having a little bit of English. I’ve been seeing this more
and more brands they do this, there’s some English in their screenshots, in their localized content, because they’ve abstracted
out a lot of the text and what’s left is just the key elements. Know your audience. If your audience is okay with that, that could be a great
way to save some dollars on localizing your images. And then, and we kind of hinted at this, if you are in a regulated industry or you’re dealing with PII, personally identifiable
information customers, it’s a great way to sort of hide that and make sure that your screenshot doesn’t look sort of hacked up. It’s not black boxes or a
blur that looks so mysterious. But it looks good and it can save you from getting customer
information out there in the wild when you shouldn’t. So, let me just run through
a couple quick examples. These are some different
brands that you recognize, or maybe you don’t recognize, and how they’re using this technique in some of their own content. So, this one is from Microsoft. They recently launched this
whole set of great tips for Microsoft Edge browser. And what you notice is that
the animation on the top is completely simplified,
there’s no text in it at all. And all the text is editable
text that’s around it, so it’s much easier to localize that. But the animation itself has no text so it doesn’t have to be localized. Now, they went all in. It might not work for you. You could even look at this and say maybe they went a little too far, that it’s a little hard to follow. But you can see the savings right away in not having to localize
those for every language. And this example is from Google. They recently put a lot of content out around the G Suite, Google Suite. And if you look particularly
in the getting started series, getting started with Slides,
getting started with Drive, you’ll find that there
are these really nice, simplified graphics that show
up in amongst the content. DropBox, this example is a Spanish webpage but it’s on the English site as well, and I expect it’s on every language. These little animations that just show you an overview of a concept,
and it’s all simplified. Again, they can use that
one graphic or animation across all of their content and languages. Procore. This is a group that some of their folks are in our SUI community. We have a Slack community with people that are trying to implement
this approach to graphics. And one of their team
members shared this example from their own documentation. And you can just see it. It’s text and then you have this graphic that everything has been simplified down, and it looks really nice. Another one from Blackboard, also a member of our
SUI community in Slack. And this is just getting at
this challenge of a blank slate. When you come into their
product it would be all blank, so how do we get people going and get them kind of over the
curve, the learning curve? So they created these little animations, again, using this simplified approach. Our own content. So, at TechSmit we do this as well. We have Snagit on Windows
and on Mac platforms. So, with being multi-platform, of course those menus aren’t
always gonna be identical. And so what you see here is
how the menus look different on Windows and Mac, and that’s okay, but in your documentation,
you just wanna show one representation of that and not have to worry
about the differences, and also not have to
update those menu items every time those two menus
might change items or wording or items come in and out of those menus. So, again, future-proofing and helping with supporting
multiple platforms. We’ll take a quick look at this one. This is actually in the Camtasia product. So, when someone opens
Camtasia for the first time, again, instead of an empty state we actually have a project on the timeline that kinda walks them
through a high-level overview of the interface and some
of the key functionality. So, I’ll let this play and
it does have some audio. And notice how much we’ve abstracted here. – [Narrator] Right now you’re
in the Camtasia editor. The editor is made up of the timeline, where you can arrange and edit your clips; the canvas, which is your video preview; and the tools panne,
where your media’s stored, along with shapes,
animations, effects, and more. At the top of the tools panel there’s a button to launch
the Camtasia recorder, a tool that captures all of the action on your computer screen. – So, you know, we just have a voice that’s kind of narrating
through and saying, “Here’s what you’re seeing.” And again, it’s really abstract. It’s very high level to say “Here’s the parts of the application “and here’s one key workflow “to get started with our recording.” And I wanna point out, in that workflow, and you’ll see it
visually illustrated here, is we’ve really been
aggressive with how much detail we’ve pulled out of the
interface for this video and we’re just showing
you the real key details. Where is that Record button and where is the Start Recording button. And a lot of the other stuff we’ve done the favor to the user of removing that for the moment so that we can focus their attention on what’s most important. All right, so. You might be thinking, cool,
how do I actually do this? I’m not gonna go into right now all the detail on how to do this. We have some great tutorial
content on our site that we’ll link to for sure and show you how to create these graphics. But let me just start by giving you a few kind of high-level
guidelines or design principles. So, the first one here, and
I’ll use this example again, is thinking about color. So, color is really important to this simplified graphic or SUI approach because color is what helps people see that it is indeed the same
interface that they’re used to. So, using those complimentary colors, the colors that are kind of similar to whatever the original interface had. But then being strategic about
things that aren’t important don’t need to be foreground. Use less contrast, even
maybe reduce the opacity, and sort of make that text
or make those elements kind of fade into the background. And then use contrast,
higher contrast areas, to either mark certain areas. You can still put a square
box or an arrow on something, so use your high contrast colors for that. But also any areas that you want to have more focus on and more attention on, use contrast deliberately there. And then the second kind
of high-level principle, how much simplification to do? And we’ve seen in these
examples that I’ve already shown we’ve seen a whole range, but mainly I would say play around with it but don’t be afraid to
simplify more than you think. So, if there’s four lines
of text in your interface, you don’t have to put four boxes to represent those four lines. Maybe two is okay. Because that just helps reduce
the amount of visual clutter. But at the same time, what you wanna leave are certain anchor points. So, branding is a great anchor point, like what’s your logo,
maybe the top-level nab. In this example I’ve got the top-level nab still visible as text. And then of course your focal area, whatever it is that you
want people to interact with and learn those steps, keep that unsimplified and literal. There’s two main ways that you can go about creating this SUI
effect, or simplified graphics. And one is to take a very manual approach, and the other is an automated approach. Let’s just talk briefly
about each of those. So, if you have a tool at your disposal like GIMP or maybe
Illustrator or something else, some folks do and they
know how to use those. What you’ll do is you’ll
use a rectangle tool, choose your colors, think about the palette
of colors in advance, and then this animation
just shows how you would go about drawing out all
those little rectangles. And you’re gonna choose a different color for each kind of different focal area and top-level sort of hierarchy. And then you’re gonna
have to line all those up. So it gets a little fiddly,
it can take some time. I would plan to spend some hours if you’re doing this manually. It’s gonna take a little way. And then what we’ve done is we’ve actually built tools
for this into Snagit 2019 because we believe that
it’s such a valuable, useful kind of approach. So we’ve put some dedicated tools in. The tool’s called Simplify. If you’re using Snagit 2019 or the trial, you can use this functionality
and try it out on your own. And so basically you’re flipping a switch to turn on Auto Simplify. We have algorithms that will read all of the different
regions of your screenshot, find the objects and the text, and then cover everything over
with the appropriate shapes. And of course you can go in and manually remove some of those in order to reveal some certain areas that you wanna have unsimplified. And the you can also change the colors, shift the palette a little bit if the algorithm didn’t
get it quite right, or move some things around. So, a lot of flexibility there that you can kinda tweak it
and make it perfect for you. And then I’m not gonna go
into full detail here either on how to do these animations but I showed examples and I
don’t wanna just tease you, so how could you go about taking this simplified approach and
put it in an animated context? So, very high level, this is an example, and I’ll show how you
would make this example in a product like Camtasia
or another video editor. So, let’s walk through this. So, first of, you start
with each of the screens. So you’re gonna get a capture of each screen as a still image and you’re gonna simplify it. Use Snagit, use Illustrator, whatever. And then once it’s simplified, you’re going to then think
about what’s appearing on top. So in this case it’s a
dialogue that appears on top. And then you have your mouse
cursor that’s moving around. So those are the elements
that you’re gonna put into a multitrack editor. So, Camtasia would be great for this. You could also use Premiere or whatever else you might
have at your disposal that’s a multitrack editor. So, you bring all those objects down. You start with the simplified
screenshots as the base layer. So, this is sort of what’s
most distant from the viewer. It’s on the bottom of
the video, so to speak. And then you put all those in and give them the right duration. Then you put your dialogue on top. So this is where you’re gonna wanna have anything that appears, like a menu item or something else that appears on top, you put that on a one layer up. And then, on the top of the cake here, you’re gonna have your cursor. And the way you make it look
like it’s moving around is you just add animation points. So, in Camtasia you can do this. And it’ll look something like what you see on your screen here with these animation points
that are each put in, and basically it’s saying
start here, end here. And at this point in time
the cursor is one location, at that point in time it’s
another location, animated. And then what we’ve done
to really pull this off as a simulation is to dip the mouse cursor. We just make it a little bit smaller and then back to normal size
each time there’s a click. So just to put it all
together at the end here, you can see that the mouse is moving and each time it gets to a
point where the screen changes, the mouse dips a little bit. The dialogue comes on at the end. And this is how all the
parts come together. It takes a little bit of planning to pull those assets together and then put them together in an editor, but once you do, this animation
can be used and reused, it’s very future-proof, and it’s a great way to
help people get an overview for a little process or a
feature in your product. So, let’s just recap the
whole information here that we’ve talked about today. Basically, we talked a lot
about why visuals matter, and that is because of preference, people really prefer to have
visuals in their content, it actually helps them to
learn and do more effectively, and then to think about the
economic outcomes of that and how that can help your
customers or your colleagues. And then finally we also
looked at a creative approach. So, SUI, simplified user interface, is one approach to how you can
actually bring down the cost and make more attainable this
visual approach to content. So it really helps with
future-proofing your content, it helps with localization, and it’s something that you
probably wanna experiment with and see where you can
start introducing this in some of your content. And if you want help and want some more
thoughts on how to do this, reach out to us, we’d love
to help walk you through it and connect you with a
community of other people who are doing the same thing.

How Much is Your Personal Injury Claim Worth? Personal Injury Compensation in Western Australia

How Much is Your Personal Injury Claim Worth? Personal Injury Compensation in Western Australia


Hello and thank you for visiting the Foyle
Lega website. The topic that I’d like to discuss with you
today is your personal injury claim. What I’d like to focus on is the quantum side
of your claim, that’s how much you claim is worth rather than the liability side of your
claim because liability difference from case to case. I’d like to discuss four key factors in a
personal injury claim. The first is medical treatment after your
injury. The second is economic loss regarding your
claim. The third is stabilization, now I know that’s
a difficult word. I will explain more about what it means later
on, and finally finalization of the claim. As I said, the first point is medical treatment. Medical treatment is an integral part of your
claim and it’s very important for the lawyers who are acting for you to accumulate evidence. For most people it means going to your general
practitioner who will then send you off for radiological evidence and we’ll send you to
a specialist. Medical evidence is usually used by the other
side in personal injury claims to try and prove that your case didn’t happen as you
said it happened and the your injury occurred as a result of something else. Now I’d like to talk to you about economic
loss. Economic loss can be a very significant part
of any personal injury claim and your lawyer can help you talk to the taxation department
and your employer to get documentary evidence of your loss. As previously stated you need to get medical
treatment in respect of your claim. Once you reach a stage where you require no
further medical treatment or no further medical treatment would be effectual, you reach a
stage called stabilization. At that stage you or your solicit can take
your claim forward to settlement. There’s an exchange of documents between the
parties so that both parties have the same documents proceeding forward to trial. At this stage, your solicitor can organize
an informal conference between the parties to try and settle the claim. In other cases it’s more appropriate to go
forward with court proceedings. Your solicitor can advise you which one is
more appropriate for your circumstances. If you have a personal injury case that you
would like to discuss. You can bring it to Foyle Legal and we’ll
discuss it with you on an obligation-free basis so you’ll know how best to proceed with
your case.

Bose Portable Home Speaker – Unboxing + Setup

Bose Portable Home Speaker – Unboxing + Setup


The Bose Portable Home Speaker is a wireless home speaker, a portable Bluetooth speaker, and a voice-controlled smart speaker, all in one. In this video, we’ll help you unbox and set up your speaker. Let’s begin by carefully opening the box, and confirm the following parts are included: The first thing you’ll see is your Bose Portable Home Speaker. Underneath this divider is a quick start guide and important safety information. Lift up this carton to find a USB-C cable, and lastly, a power supply. Now let’s set up your speaker. Begin by connecting one end of the USB-C cable into the power port on your speaker. Connect the other end into the power supply, and then plug it into a power outlet. Please note, you can also charge your speaker with the optional Bose Portable Home Speaker Charging Cradle accessory. The power light will pulse white to indicate it’s charging. Once the power light glows solid white, your speaker is fully charged, and can provide up to 12 hours of audio playback. For the most functionality, we recommend downloading the Bose Music App from the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store. Sign in with or create a new Bose ID. From the “My Bose” screen, tap the “+” button. Your device will begin searching for your Portable Home Speaker. Once you see your speaker, tap “Add Product.” Follow the onscreen instructions to connect your speaker to Wi-Fi, name your speaker, set up sharing settings, and add any compatible voice assistants in your region. Your Bose Portable Home Speaker is now set up. For additional support, visit our website.