ANDRÉ GOMES READS FAN MAIL | MIDFIELDER OPENS LETTERS OF SUPPORT FOLLOWING INJURY


Hey guys. Well… I received a lot of letters and emails
and I would like to thank you all for your kind support. For real, it means a lot to me and it will
make this easier, so thank you very much to all of you. I have one here from Oliver. It says, ‘Dear
André, I hope you get well soon. I can’t wait for you to get back on Goodison Park
and score lots of goals’. Honestly, it’s like a young kid and it means
a lot – especially from a young lad and an Evertonian. From Regan: ‘I’m a Liverpool fan, but I hope
you get better soon’. Thanks a lot. We know how hard it is for a
football fan, especially from another team. It doesn’t matter the colour, so thank you
very much, Regan for your support. I have a few emails as well here… ‘Hi André. I was watching the game against
Spurs at home and I was so disappointed to see you injured that I kicked my table and
broke my toe.’ ‘Best wishes from Ben’. Wow, this is a weird one! Honestly, I feel
bad for you, Ben. I didn’t want that to happen to you. I hope you get well soon. I would
wish that nothing like this would happen to both of us, but thank you very much for your
message and your support. I’m giving best wishes to you as well. A new one… Sharon Richards. It says: ‘You will always have a special place
in our home after treating our Sam to a coat at Everton One last year. You are a brilliant
football player, but what a nice fellow too’. Erm… thank you! Thank you very much. I remember when this happened with Sam. As
I said to all of you before, thank you for your support. A big ‘hi’ to Sam as well. It’s
nice to receive this email from you and thank you – thank you once again. I have a lot of letters here. I will try to
take my time at home with everything. Honestly, guys… It’s almost impossible to put into words.
I feel sensitive and emotional because of what you have done for me. I just need to
thank you all. It’s emotion. I will be back back stronger, for sure. I want to help the team reach the goals we
set at the beginning of the season and once again, thank you. Thank you for everything.

Liverpool provide Joe Gomez injury update on leg fracture

Liverpool provide Joe Gomez injury update on leg fracture


 Liverpool defender Joe Gomez will undergo an operation on his leg fracture today   Gomez hasn’t played since picking up the injury against Burnley at the start of December  He was initially tipped to be back within six weeks but the Reds are now not putting a time limit on his return  There are no fears he will miss the rest of the season, though.   Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp has ruled the defender out of the first leg of the Reds’ Champions League last-16 clash with Bayern Munich later this month   But he is likely to miss both legs as well as key Premier League games against Manchester United and Everton Read More Liverpool handed major Champions League boost ahead of Bayern Munich clash    Klopp said: “It’s a blow for the boy and for us – because prior to the injury he was in such fantastic shape  “But he is too valuable to take any risk with, both for our present and future, so we get this procedure done and he comes back when he’s ready  “His attitude during this rehab has been outstanding but it just hasn’t healed as we’d have liked so we will make this intervention and then he will come back ” Read More Liverpool predicted line-up vs West Ham as Jurgen Klopp considers changes    The defender added: “Obviously being out for longer than we’d first hoped for is hard to swallow but it’s part and parcel of the industry  “It was an injury caused by an impact, like nearly all the injuries I’ve had in my career, so I know it’s just a case of when it’s fully healed I’m good to go again  “The hardest part is not being able to help the team and contribute on the pitch at the moment, so it’s important I come back ready to go and this procedure will help with that  “My only focus is getting back for Liverpool as soon as possible and I can promise the supporters I’ll be working hard every day to do that ” Read More Mirror Football’s Top Stories

Back Pain Relief (1 of 2) – Immediate Fixes


Hey guys welcome to the channel! Today
we’re going to talk about some things that do to alleviate my back pain. These
will be more immediate things that I do when I have back pain now. This
is going to be the first of a two-part series. In the second part of this series,
I’ll go over some things that I do to prevent back pain, but first a disclaimer. The opinions or information in this video should not be taken as advice in any form, medical, financial, legal, or anything else. Please pause the video now to read the rest of the disclaimer or read it in the show notes. I came up with this list over 15 to 20 years through trial and error. We’ll start with number 10 and count our way down to number 1. Number 10 is the Spineworx. This is an
item that I got off Amazon.com. I’ll have a link to it in the show notes, but
basically it is kind of a rigid piece of plastic thing and you lay on it. It is
supposed to align your spine. I did get some relief out of this thing. I have
been told that I have reverse curvature of the spine, and to be quite honest when I first lay on this thing it’s kind of painful and doesn’t feel very good. But,
after I lay on it for a little while, that starts to feel better, and I think
it does provide some help for me. Number 9 is an ice pack — not too long though. I only use one for ten to 15 minutes at a time and if my skin starts to feel numb in that area I will remove it immediately. I was a little skeptical
about this one, but it actually works better than I thought. It seems to have the effect of taking an ibuprofen or something similar. It’s a non-drug way to get some relief from inflammation. All ice packs aren’t created equal though.
This blue one that I’ll have a link to in the show notes is a lot better than just putting it in a plastic bag. It seems to sweat a lot less, and it’s a lot more comfortable. They’re dirt cheap too they are a pretty cheap and effective solution. Number 8, stretching, especially if my hamstrings are tight from working out too much from running or biking. I’ve got two simple stretches that I’ll do. For the first one, I just sit in the floor and try to touch my toes basically a lot of times I’m so tight I can’t even get close to touching my toes and I’ll just grab my leg or and try to pull forward as much as I can. I’ll hold these stretches for, you know, 20 seconds, maybe up to a minute, and over time I’ll get a little bit more
limber even during that stretching session. The other stretch I do is the
ballerina stretch. It’s where I hike my leg up on a bar, sometimes a windowsill,
just something a little over a hip height, and I’ll lean forward and when I
do these stretches it seems to loosen my back up. Number 7, a high density foam
roller, similar to the one I’ve got pictured here on the slide. I got this at Amazon.com. I’ll have a link to one of these in the show notes. I keep a smaller one of these
at work too which is very handy. I have an office that I can actually roll on it
sometimes if I’ve having some back pain at work but at home I’ve got the bigger
version it’s about 1 yard wide it’s probably 6 to 8 inches in diameter and
it’s pretty dense and it actually kind of hurts a little bit when you’re
rolling on it but there’s various different ways you can roll on it I
mainly just roll on it lengthwise sometimes all the way from my feet to my
head sometimes and it will loosen you up quite a bit I was quite pleased with how
well this works this thing works super good in my opinion it’s probably
one of the most bang for the buck stings that I have in my arsenal to treat my
back pain and it’s predict an or 20 bucks so I wish I’d found out about
these years ago number 6 magnesium as a muscle relaxer and non-steroidal
anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs those would be like ibuprofen naproxen those
sort of things of course before making any changes to
any of your supplement or medications please check with your doctor or
pharmacist or healthcare provider as far as the magnesium goes I take one capsule
nightly sort of as a preventative measure just to kind of keep my back
loose at night and that seems to work pretty well for me when I wasn’t taking
one nightly I would take one when I was having a back spasm and that seemed to
help other people I know use magnesium oil and will rub it in they get some
relief from that they’ve told me other people will use epsom salts and a bath
and soak in it and that seems to work well for them as far as the insects go
my preferred NSAID is naproxen i’ll usually just take one I think it’s a 220
milligram tablet I’ll take once or twice a day 12 hours apart and
I’ll just take that first little time as I possibly can
doing this seems to help get the inflammation down which provides me with
some immediate relief number five bio freeze spray this was
first recommended to me by my chiropractor
I bought it his office but I’ve since found it on Amazon and Walmart and I’ll
have a link in the show notes it has menthol in it so there is a bit
of a smell however I find that the spray evaporates pretty nicely and it doesn’t
get all over everything too bad I will wear a t-shirt or
something often to kind of shield that menthol from other things I don’t want
to contaminate but this stuff’s pretty awesome
number four warm water I start out my morning by taking a warm shower and of
course that just helps get me going but I also use it if I have acute back pain
I’ll jump in the shower or a tub or a hot tub and just soak for a bit
obviously not too long I used some precautions here but the warm water just
fine just loosens me up quite a bit number three movement movement in
general really helps out my back road biking really helped it out just that
movement from the pedaling walking about 400 meters even when I really don’t feel
like it which is basically every morning really helps to loosen it up also I’ll
do some exercises called cat and camel I’ll do about 10 of those quickly just
jumping on the floor and do those real quick google it and you’ll find some
really good examples on those number two a great chiropractor they are not all
equal let me tell you I have been to a few that have been awesome though and
I’ve really been able to help me out especially in the short term they didn’t
fix it for the long term but they definitely helped me over the short term
I like to steer clear the ones that want to put you on some sort of a payment
plan I’ll mention physical therapy here as well
I know that’s a lot different than chiropractors but I have seen a lot of
people get good results from them just not me personally because I haven’t
tried them but they do seem to provide a lot of help to a lot of people from what
I have seen and heard and finally number one
Bowen therapy also known as the bowing technique bowen therapy helped fix the
reverse curvature of my spine and other therapies never did you can google that
I didn’t get an official diagnosis but I had several chiropractors tell me that I
had it over the years they could never fix it locally it cost about $60 per
session and I saw a massive results after just three sessions those
three sessions made me feel so good and I went back and had several more just to
see what else they could fix it had long-lasting effects for months maybe
even years I haven’t been back probably in a year or two and I still feel better
from it it’s just phenomenal it’s kind of a weird technique so I’ll tell you to
go ahead and just google it right now it’s bizarre but it’s the best thing
I’ve ever found thank you so much for joining me today for the video if you
liked it please hit the thumbs up button and subscribe and also look for the link
for the second part in the video where I will explain some things that I do to
prevent back pain in the first place until next time we’ll see you

Ask the Vet – Suspensory ligament injuries

Ask the Vet – Suspensory ligament injuries


SARAH: “Can you do a video on
suspensory ligament injuries please?” DR LYDIA GRAY: OK
so I think– did we do bowed tendons last time? SARAH: I don’t know
if it was last time, but we’ve definitely
talked about them. DR LYDIA GRAY: So
they’re related, because they’re both soft
tissue, connective tissue. The tendons are the structures
that connect muscles to bones. And the ligaments
connect bones to bones. So they’re related. When we’re talking about
the suspensory ligament– easy for me to say– in particular, we’ll talk
about the location first. So it’s on the leg between
the knee and the ankle or the hock and the ankles– so lower limbs of all four legs. And it’s the tissue that butts
right up against the cannon bone. So if the horse is
facing this way. So it’s from the
outside you have your skin, your
superficial digital flexor tendon, your deep digital
flexor tendon, and then the suspensory. What that means is it’s
not as easy, especially on the hindlimb, to image. So our imaging
choices are X-rays, ultrasound is pretty good. But not as good as with tendons. They’re looking now at
maybe MRI is the best way to categorize the
original injury and then follow the progression. And you can now do standing
MRIs with just sedation and not need general anesthesia. So that’s why they’re
thinking maybe this imaging tool is now
becoming appropriate for this. I was going to say, I’ve
got good news and bad news. Well, the good news is that
if you catch this early and get right on it with some
modern medical management treatment, the
forelimb suspensories, they take longer than tendons. Because last time
remember we did the– SARAH: –the number of
letters in the word. DR LYDIA GRAY: So bone
was four, tendon was six, and ligaments, what, eight? SARAH: Yep. DR LYDIA GRAY: So they can take
nine months to a year to heal. But if it’s an acute front limb
suspensory you’ve got a chance. I want to read something. Acute hindlimb proximal
suspensory desmitis is much worse. 13% were sound and in
full work at six months. And the prognosis for their
chronic hindlimb cases approaches 0%. Now, don’t give up all hope. But do involve your
vet right away. They’re challenging– the
cardinal signs of inflammation or the signs of this
kind of lameness are heat swelling and pain,
except that with the suspensory being so deep you always
don’t get that swelling. So you can’t depend
on the limb being big and swollen as like,
oh, got to call the vet. Sometimes the only clinical sign
is the horse isn’t performing as well as he used to. One of the risk factors
for a pulled suspensory is advanced dressage training. So if you have a horse
that does a lengthen or medium or extended trot,
and then they can’t or they don’t want to, that should
make you think that maybe I should have the vet out. So it can be as subtle as that. And you have to get on it
to give your horse the best chance of recovering from it. I will say Newman had a
pulled suspensory back when he was five. SARAH: Wow. DR LYDIA GRAY: Yeah. And that was what I saw. SARAH: That was so long ago. DR LYDIA GRAY: Yeah. And he’s 17 now. And he has not only returned
to full work the same level, but went up. So I got right on it and
managed it appropriately and did everything my vet said. And he’s back to working. So there is hope. And it was his front limb
so I had a better chance. The hindlimbs are–
boy, they’re tough. They’re really tough. I hope this person does not
have one on their horse. SARAH: Yeah. I mean it was just a
request for a video. So we don’t know. DR LYDIA GRAY: True, true. We don’t know. SARAH: So hopefully we
addressed all the questions that you have.

Huge Update On Kairi Sane’s Injury Status After WWE TLC

Huge Update On Kairi Sane’s Injury Status After WWE TLC


Hi Friends welcome to C4E Wrestling News Huge
Update On Kairi Sane’s Injury Status After WWE TLC The main event of WWE TLC 2019 caused
a bit of concern as Kairi Sane reportedly suffered a concussion during the Women’s Tag
Team title match It was clear that Becky Lynch began to call audibles and slow it down once
she realized something had gone wrong During Wrestling Observer Radio Bryan Alvarez spoke
about Kairi Sane’s brutal looking spot that possibly caused an injury He said I thought
that she got hurt when she took the SOS slam into the dasher boards because the mats were
pulled away from the cement and she landed on the cement and not the mat and she totally
fell apart from that point forward He also said I don’t know if it’s a concussion
All I was told was after the show she was in medical I didn’t hear anything after
that Becky did tweet out Kairi Sane you truly are a warrior So I mean there was an injury
we hope that she’s given adequate rest and that it was only a concussion scare and not
an actual concussion Either way WWE will do the right thing and protect her It probably
means that we won’t see her wrestling for the rest of the year but in such cases it’s
the right call to make Friends what are your thought about this Let Us Know in the Comment
Section below and Be Sure to Follow Us on Twitter and Facebook! Also Subscribe to My Channel C 4 E Wrestling
News

The Ottawa Ankle Rules | Ankle Fracture Clinical Prediction Rule


In this video, I’m going to demonstrate the Ottawa ankle rules to rule out fractures of the ankle and mid foot in an acute situation. Hi, and welcome back to Physiotutors de Ottawa ankle Rules have been developed in order to reduce the needs of radiographs after an acute Trauma. review by Buckman et Al. from the Year 2003 Rated the sensitivity between 96.4 to 99.6 percent and the specificity at 26.3 to 47.9 percent. So if the Ottawa Ankle rules are negative, chances of a fracture are low. Now let’s imagine the following situation You are a physiotherapist at a sporting event and you see an athlete Getting injured at the ankle. you can use the following sequence to rule out an ankle fracture. first palpate for tenderness on the posterior edge of the Lateral and Medial Malleolus start distally and move six centimeters upwards. Then palpate for pain or tenderness over the navicular bone and fifth metatarsal. For the last criterion ask the patient’s to walk four consecutive steps It doesn’t matter how the patient is walking, he might as well be limping. now if one out of three items is positive There’s a 25 to 50 percent chance that there is a fracture, the patient should then get x-Rays done. But if all three items are negative there is close to a 100 percent chance of no fracture at all. All right That’s the end of the video if you like you can check out the Ottawa knee rules or the anterior drawer test of the ankle on the left. Don’t forget to like and subscribe. This is us on social media or on our website This was Andreas from Physiotutors. I’ll see you next time. Bye

Vascular Surgery – Vascular Injury: By Adam Power M.D. and Yiting Hao R.N.

Vascular Surgery – Vascular Injury: By Adam Power M.D. and Yiting Hao R.N.


Vascular injury, both as penetrating or blunt
trauma, can be a life-threatening presentation to the emergency room and is often complicated
by non-apparent hemorrhage, for instance into the retro-peritoneal space. Left untreated, vascular injuries can lead
to hemorrhagic shock, thrombosis, and compartment syndrome. Blunt vascular injuries occur frequently during
motor vehicle collisions, and commonly affect the thoracic and abdominal aorta. Blunt aortic injury is thought to occur following
rapid deceleration and tearing of the aorta distal to the origin of the left subclavian
artery. [Parmley, 1958] Penetrating trauma causes
crushing and separation of tissues along the penetrating object and often affects the extremities. This type of injury is mostly associated with
gunshot and knife wounds. On initial presentation be sure to follow
the ATLS guidelines and complete a systematic primary assessment, using the ABDCDE approach. Treatment priority is based on injuries, vitals
and injury mechanism. The primary goals of intervention are to locate
the bleeding, stop it, and restore intravascular volume while maintaining homeostasis through
a functional blood composition. Remember, the clinical features of a patient
with blunt vascular trauma may range from asymptomatic to severe hypotension and shock. It is essential to keep in mind the sources
of severe and life-threatening hemorrhage. ATLS guidelines suggest to look for “blood
on the floor and then four more” (chest, abdomen, pelvis/retroperitoneum, and long
bones). In the extremities, the most common presentation
of arterial injury is acute ischemia. Hard signs of arterial injury are: an audible bruit or palpable thrill
pulsatile hematoma expanding hematoma
active bleeding signs of ischemia The classic 5 P’s of acute limb ischemia
include: Pain
Pallor Paralysis
Paresthesia Pulselessness
We then investigate more thoroughly with a secondary assessment, using FAST scans, as
well as pelvic, chest and abdominal x-rays. Laboratory studies are essential for monitoring
these patients: Blood group and crossmatch is sent quickly
but patients often require O negative blood due to urgency. Complete blood count to monitor hemoglobin
is useful in slow bleeding, and is typical obtained every 6 hours in series. It is of limited used in acute severe hemorrhage. Coagulation parameters must be assessed and
any anti-coagulation medication the patient has been taking must be reversed. Coagulopathy may be observed in a trauma patient
following acidosis, hypothermia, and hemodilution following aggressive intravascular resuscitation. Compartment syndrome is a serious complication
associated with vascular injuries and needs to be monitored after limb ischemia and then
reperfusion. It is the increase in intracompartmental pressure
that impairs tissue perfusion and can lead to tissue death. Although this is a clinical diagnosis, creatinine
kinase and myoglobin in addition to renal function, must also be monitored with increased. Tell-tale clinical signs include: Pain out of proportion to injury not relieved
by analgesicsPain with contraction of compartment Pain with passive stretch
Severe swelling Loss of arterial pulse is a late finding Therapy is often dependent on the hemodynamic
status. While expectant management can be reserved
for intimal tears and some small pseudoaneurysms, definitive therapy in the form of operative
or endovascular repair is reserved for injuries penetrating the outer vessel wall or occluded
arteries.

Minor Injury Cap in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia & PEI

Minor Injury Cap in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia & PEI


There’s a common misconception
in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and PEI that the minor injury cap limits the total amount you can recover
following a motor vehicle accident. If you were involved in an accident
caused by someone else, you may have received a call
from their insurance adjuster talking to you about the cap and offering
you that amount as a settlement. Before you settle your insurance claim, you should know that the minor injury cap only applies to one component: Pain and Suffering. Pain and Suffering provides compensation for things to which we can’t
attribute a specific value, such as physical scarring
or emotional stress. That is what the cap limits,
and only in cases of minor injuries. If you were involved in a motor vehicle accident
that was caused by someone else, you may be entitled to make a claim
for other things. For example, if you’ve missed
some time from work you may have a claim for loss of income or future loss of earnings. You may also claim for past or future
medical treatments. Those are things that are not limited
by the minor injury cap. Furthermore, if your injuries don’t fall within the
government’s definition of minor injury, your claim for Pain and Suffering
will not be limited either. We often recommend that people wait
about a year before settling their claim. It can take that long for your injuries
to become apparent and once you’ve accepted an offer
from the insurance company, you can’t make another claim. With that said, you should know all the
details of your claim and your injuries before accepting an offer
from the insurance company.

How to PACK a WOUND | Bitesize First Aid

How to PACK a WOUND | Bitesize First Aid


– Catastrophic bleeding
and how to pack a wound. So many of us have heard of tourniquets and how you can stop bleeding on limbs by actually occluding or
blocking the blood supply below the wound. Or what if it’s more of a blast and you
can’t get to the source of the bleeding? Maybe it’s on the side of you and it’s not suitable for a tourniquet. So another way to stop
bleeding in this sort of wound is to actually pack the wound. Now what you are doing
when you’re doing this is, please wear gloves, so with your gloved hand, you are putting your finger
into the source of the bleeding. So you’re actually stopping
where the blood is coming out. You are then getting something to pack that wound. Now the military and the
NHS use things like Cellux or trauma gauze, which has a clotting agent on it. And that will increase the clotting and allow the wound to clot far quicker than you packing a wound. However, packing a wound
with an improvised dressing is still incredibly powerful. You can save somebody’s life with a sock. How about that? And what you would do is find
the source of the bleeding with your finger, so a gloved finger, gloved hand, and you get something like this, so this is just a triangular
bandage or it could be a sock or it could be a bit of
cotton shirt or whatever, and what you are doing is
literally putting that in and then bit by bit, you are lifting up and pushing down on top of this packing so that you are packing that wound in all the different areas, so that as you are packing it, which you would do relatively quickly, you are then filling the
wound with this material so that when you are now pushing down, you are applying pressure
directly to the source of the wound, because you have filled it. So you would put it in like this. You would apply pressure on top, ideally with a dressing or, if you have access to one of
these great blast dressing type of things, you can do a really good
compression over the top where you will put this
in and you can use this with this natty, little gadget to get it on as tight as you possibly can. ‘Cause you will need the pressure to stop the bleeding coming through. So you would put this on, you twist it, this one, as you go round, but you would put this on tightly and you would get emergency
help as quickly as possible. Look for signs of shock. If they’ve got a catastrophic bleed, they will be showing signs of shock. Keep them warm, keep them dry. Elevate the legs if at all possible. And this is an emergency, get help fast. (gentle music)