Pressure Injury New Staging

Pressure Injury New Staging


this past April 2016 the National
pressure ulcer advisory panel came out with new guidelines for pressure ulcer
staging some of the new things to look out for is pressure ulcers are no longer
called pressure ulcers they are called pressure injuries the staging guidelines
for the most common pressure injuries stage one through four remain the same
however we no longer use Roman numerals and we use Arabic numerals so the
regular one two three and four the reason for the change from pressure
ulcer to pressure injury was to clarify that stage 1 pressure ulcers are not
really open ulcers there are actually injuries and there is no open skin that
is intact skin another change that was made was that suspected deep tissue
injury is now just called deep tissue injury and the panel also created two
new categories which are medical device related pressure injuries and mucosal
membrane pressure injuries which relate to either medical devices or injuries to
the mucosal membranes it must be very important for practitioners to start
adopting or learning this new language although it will take time to adopt this
language we will be doing this in our practice at skilled wound care and we
recommend our partners realize this in the nursing facility this will probably
be something that will come about in the MDS guidelines in the future and people
must be aware of this and of course as new things come about we learn about
them once again we believe at skilled wound care that pressure injuries are a
result of a multitude of factors not just poor nursing care or not just poor
medical care and we really want to work together as a team to provide a
partnership in healing you

Fractures and Tendon Muscle Joint Injuries

Fractures and Tendon Muscle Joint Injuries


Marine Online this section should give a short introduction to fractures tendon muscle and joint injuries handling and transport you the framework of the body is called the skeleton and consists of approximately 220 bones these bones are connected with joints tendons and muscles injuries to the bones are called fractures fractures are caused by direct force or pressure stretching blowing overloading twisting you definitive fracture is visible pieces of bone open fracture angulation visible shortening of a limb and crepitation indication of a fracture is swelling Payne malfunction and paleness you stabilizing the fractured area is done too locations to relieve pain so the transportation can be carried out fast and gently click on the hot spots to see what a good spin should and should not do professional splints are inflatable splint cardboard splint stretch tension splint Sager splint vacuum splint Cramer splint if you don’t have any of these splints available use your imagination a good splint should not prevent adequate blood Galatian compressed nerves chill or heat the injured area or have sharp pointed edges a good splint must be adequately stiff or rigid be long enough to extend beyond the injured area immobilize the joint over and under the injury and be padded sprained an acute tendon muscle or joint injury is the result of the tissue being for a short moment exposed to a greater force or more pressure than it can endure for example caused by push thrust or blow the extent of the damage depends on the type of tissue its elasticity etc compared to the force it is exposed to the objective of first aid treatment for this type of damage is to reduce pain prevent swelling and reduce the length of the healing process sprain injuries have to a logic same symptoms as a fracture therefore in many cases it may be difficult to tell one from the other if in doubt whether the injury is a sprain or fracture always treat as a fracture the symptoms are Payne decreased mobility swelling and change of color such as blue yellow or purple treatment a sprain injury should be treated according to the RIC II principle rest ice compression elevation this all-round treatment is always for the best of the patient giving pain relief and favorable healing for injuries to larger muscles it is more important to use pressure to the area rather than cooling because the cooling effect will not be absorbed deep enough the letters are I see II mean the following R is the first letter of rest rest means to rest and protect the injured area for the first 24 to 48 hours and to stop activity that causes pain and soreness I is the first letter of ice ice means reduce bleeding reduce swelling and relieve pain see is the first letter of impression this is most important during the first 24 hours compression is done to reduce bleeding and to reduce swelling it is important to observe the blood circulation below the injured area E is the first letter of elevation elevation is done to relieve pain and to improve blood circulation transporting a patient and choice of evacuation or transport method will always depend on the following how much time a disposal available material available personnel type at extent of the injury access to and from place of injury require treatment during the transport there are several methods on how to hand and transport a person we will now take a closer look at the most used methods the injured person is raised to a half sitting position and the rescuer grasps around his wrists the rescuer stands up and can now drag the patient this is no gentle way of transport but it is a fast and effective way of moving an injured person out of a dangerous area the method is relatively easy to practice and an effective way of moving heavy patients it may be difficult to open doors or move objects as the rescuer does not have his hands-free the basis of this lifting method is the drag method number one rescuer stands behind the injured person grasping his wrist number two rescuer takes hold of the injured persons thighs as close to his crotch as possible lifting each leg this is a relatively gentle and safe method of transport where the rescuers at all times can see where they are going this method should not be used if the injured person has fractures and an unconscious patient may easily get his Airways blocked you a well-known lifting method useful when the patient is conscious and able to cooperate this is the fastest method of moving a patient in addition the rescuer has one hand free to open doors move obstacles etc once the patient is up on your shoulders this is an easy way of transport that you must keep in mind that this is not a gentle way of transport this method is safe fast easy and a good way to put a patient onto a stretcher it requires four to five helpers who can lift the patient don’t forget the patient’s head if the patient is unconscious the head will roll sideways unless someone is responsible for securing the head this person should be the one giving the command okay lift so that everyone lifts at the same time one person shall push the stretcher under the patient if the patient has a back injury this is a good way to handle the patient when a scoop stretcher is not available it is very important that everyone lifts at the same time this is the most common used lifting method when placing an injured person on a stretcher the bearers three persons should kneel on the left side of the injured one bearers should be in command and he shall concentrate on the patient’s head neck and shoulders all three bearers shall lift the injured at the same time a fourth helper moving the stretcher under the injured with this lifting method there is very little movement of the patient’s body this method should not be used when moving a patient with counter stretcher you the first aider must at all times consider his own health and safety he can be of no help if he jeopardizes his own safety this means using correct lifting methods whenever possible some lifting operations may have to be carried out within very narrow passages and severe working conditions the following rules must be practiced whenever possible plan the lift and transport try to get help from others before lifting evaluate if the patient can be placed in a better more comfortable position keep your back straight lift your head and look straight ahead lift using your legs

Video Brings Visibility to Invisible Disabilities and Invisible Illness!

Video Brings Visibility to Invisible Disabilities and Invisible Illness!


(Natalie Tysdale) Have you watched someone parking in an accessible spot but they’re not using a wheelchair? Have you wondered if they really have a disability? Has someone ever shared with you about their illness or disability and you can’t see the symptoms and you might think or actually say to them “you don’t look sick?” Well these situations and many others like them often end in disbelief, prejudice, isolation and loneliness. Wayne and Sherri Connell founded the Invisible Disabilities Association for these very reasons over twenty years ago. they wanted to provide education, encouragement and connection to the millions who are touched by illness, pain and disability around the globe. IDA is treating the deeper roots of problems in society not just specific diseases but the perceptions and misconceptions and deep-seated notions of what it means to live daily with an invisible disability or to care for someone who does. Everyone has a story a friend, a family member, a co-worker, maybe even yourself? Here are some of their stories. (Sherri Connell) I had great plans for my life. I was extremely active goal oriented person. I was just always on the go and none of those plans included being sick. I was also having bouts with paralysis and they didn’t know why then at 27 years old all of the sudden one side went totally paralyzed the next thing I know I was paralyzed from the ribs down. Eventually after being in the hospital for a week, they diagnosed me with multiple sclerosis. The world changed I was in an auto accident and the accident. I was unconscious. I was injured and my memory was fading away. I discovered that I had a brain injury as a result of the accident. (Pete Ohlin) [piano music] Initially I was interested in Invisible Disabilities because I believe my music could help others they’re struggling with an invisible disabilities and then about four years ago my daughter was diagnosed with a with a rare heart condition which would be considered an invisible disability. [Piano Music] (Cassandra Perkins) I was born blind in my left eye and you can’t tell because it’s hemi-blindness people get angry people would make fun of me and you know you don’t think that it gets to you but then it starts to get to you. I can’t even take care of my daily needs I can barely get a shower or wash my hair. It takes takes me days to wash my hair and get it combed out. No one can imagine living alone with a brain injury. You don’t know if the dishes are done you don’t know if you’re taking a bath you don’t know how to dress you don’t know, you don’t know because you don’t remember if you know me, you see me you don’t think that I have this thing going in my head that I’m constantly battling. And the hardest part is people didn’t get it. People would say, “but you look fine.” “What’s the problem?” People need to see it to believe it! and that is the hardest part. And I was this happy, positive, outgoing, life loving kid and then everyday being told that “I’m fat” that “I’m emo” that “I’m goth” that “I’m ugly” it gets in your head it really starts to get to you and I would go to my mirror every day in my room and slowly this person this Cassandra Perkins that I love just disappeared. One of the most insensitive things I think that I got from a principal and also a teacher was that your daughter “looks fine” “she looks great” and I get it from people on Facebook to which in my head I’m replying like “yeah right you can you can see that the blood is pooling in her legs and that her heart isn’t working correct right?” [Laughing] One day I realized I have an invisible disability! It’s invisible! People can’t see it! And I was so excited because it just completely wrapped around the description of what I was going through. I think if we give people a platform and give people a safe place to talk about these things they’re gonna be more willing to open up and know that they can make connections. I have someplace to go some people to talk to when I’m starting to get frustrated or I had a bad day I can pick up a phone and call that’s very important because up until recently I was by myself. There’s days where people feel really good, there’s days where people feel really bad, but they know that they can come to this social media platform and be able to connect through that. [Background Music] And the Invisible Disabilities Association shows people the mountain so that they can see our perseverance and how hard we fight. I feel supported and I feel like I have an organization that’s fighting for me! Here’s why I love Invisible Disabilities because there’s so many aspects of the spectrum there’s helping the caregiver there’s helping the person who’s going through it as well as helping people who are just outside family or friends how to help that person how to say the right things what to do. So what I drool? So what my clothes don’t match? It’s my disability, get over it! I’m here and I’m not going to go away, I’m not gonna hide anymore, I’m here! [Background Music] (Wayne Connell) Wow, those stories were amazing and many of you have a story maybe it’s a story of illness and pain but really what it is is a story of people not believing you and we want to believe you we want to understand that just because we can’t see the illness or the pain that doesn’t mean it’s not real so it Invisible Disabilities we believe you, we want to acknowledge the difficulties you’re going through because we know you’re the expert who’s living with the illness and pain and disability. We want to be your voice and we want you to join us in that. We want you to join us in sharing those stories and we want you to be that voice as well along with us. So please go to InvisibleNoMore.com that’s InvisibleNoMore.com Because let’s together envision a world where people living with illness, pain and disability will be Invisible No More!

Stress fractures and running wearables: The mistake that could mean injuries

Stress fractures and running wearables: The mistake that could mean injuries


So the key thing to understand is that
the force under your foot, the ground reaction force, is not the force on the
bones, muscles and joints in your body. So we conducted an experiment where we had 10
runners come into the lab and we had them run across a range of speeds and
slopes. We were able to use different sensors to capture their motion and the
force between the foot and the ground. There’s a really strong interest from
the NFL Players Association to use technology in a smart way to help
prolong the careers of the athletes. This type of tool may even help us
identify when the risk of injury starts to increase so we can modify practice
times. I know the frustration and difficulty that is associated with
being injured and sidelined when you’d rather be out competing. If we can take
wearable sensors, integrate them into people’s shoes or socks in some way that
can inform them that they’re at risk of injury, I think that would be a huge win
for recreational runners, for elite runners, for other professional sports
teams and for people in different occupations that are at high risk for
stress fractures.

Work Injury: What should I do if I am injured at work?

Work Injury: What should I do if I am injured at work?


Work Injury: What should I do if I am
injured at work? 1. you should one report the injury to your
employer immediately to seek medical treatment and three call to five two two
four three one zero zero three to make an appointment with me
pre-consultation as soon as possible the sooner you get to me the better chance
you have of keeping your job and obtaining just compensation from the
insurance carrier

My 7 Year Long Injury (And How I Stay Motivated To Train)


What’s up, guys? Sean Nalewanyj on www.SeanNal.com – www.RealScienceAthletics.com,
and today I wanted to talk about something a bit different. Something I’ve never talked about before on
the channel, and that is the fairly significant injury that I’ve had for about seven years
now. And it’s an injury that’s had a pretty big
effect on my training. It’s part of the reason why I don’t upload
lifting footage on YouTube, at least not right now, since I can’t really train the way that
I want to. And the reason why I wanted to address this
is to just kind of give you guys some more insight into myself and where I’m at, because
I don’t talk about myself a lot here, I mostly just do informative content, and I also wanted
to share some advice on how I’ve dealt with that injury mentally just in terms of maintaining
motivation and continuing to train in spite of it. Now, most people probably wouldn’t guess this,
but I’ve actually been lifting consistently for almost 20 years now. Longer than my teenage subscribers had even
been alive. I’m 32 and I started lifting when I was 13. The first 10 years of my training were pretty
smooth sailing for the most part aside from just some minor injuries here and there, the
kind of stuff that most lifters deal with from time to time, shoulder tweak, some lower
back discomfort, things like that, but about seven years ago this random really weird injury
happened that just never went away. I’m still dealing with it now. It was just a normal everyday push workout,
I went in to train chest shoulders and triceps, I started off with some dumbbell presses and
then I went on to a machine press, and on the first set all of a sudden, out of nowhere,
both of my elbows just start popping on every rep. There was no sudden form slip up, I wasn’t
going heavy, there was no warning for this whatsoever, but just on each rep right when
my elbow would hit about 90 degrees on the way up I’d get this sort of snapping, popping
sensation in both elbows. It wasn’t overly painful but clearly something
was off. I honestly didn’t think much of it at the
time, I just figured you know I’ll give it some rest, maybe there’s some tightness in
there so I’ll stretch, I’ll get a lacrosse ball in there and loosen it up and everything
will be fine. But a week goes by it’s still there, another
week still there, and now it’s also starting to get more painful as well. So, I go and see a physiotherapist to get
it looked at, they can’t tell me what it is, I go and see another one they can’t tell me
either. So I just kept on training, I worked around
it as best I could, and ultimately I ended up seeing probably seven or eight different
people to try and get some answers, I did a bunch of stretching and foam rolling and
mobility work, but unfortunately none of this really did much of anything. And then eventually by doing a bunch of digging
online and a lot of research on my own I finally figured out what it was, and it turns out
that I have something called snapping triceps syndrome. You’ve probably never heard of it, it’s a
fairly uncommon injury, it’s not understood exactly what causes it but basically what
happens is that when I flex and extend my elbow a portion of the medial head of the
tricep snaps back and forth over the elbow joint, and then the ulnar nerve which also
runs through that same area, that nerve snaps along with it and that’s the funny bone nerve,
it’s the nerve that controls the pinky and the ring finger. And that’s why if I try to go heavy on pushing
exercises not only is it painful but I also get nerve symptoms as well, things like aching
and tingling, and a bit of a numb feeling in these two fingers. But the bottom line is that unfortunately
snapping triceps can only be cured fully through surgery and it would probably cost around
6 to $8,000 per elbow to get it done, and it would really put me out of commission for
a while and probably take a year or so before I’d be back to full strength. And I’d also have to do each elbow separately
spaced out by about a month or two each, so that’s going to prolong the recovery time
even further. At this point I’d say I’m pretty much 95%
certain that I am gonna get the surgery at some point, seven years is a long time to
have this injury but I’ve just been working around it over all these years, and I’ve also
been really focused on my business, so fitness hasn’t been my main focus and so just maintaining
has been fine with me and I wasn’t even sure if I wanted to go through with the surgery,
so that’s why I’ve left it all this time. Earlier this year I tried to reach out to
pretty much every orthopedic surgery clinic in Canada that I could find, I did go and
see somebody here in Vancouver for a consultation, but unfortunately I haven’t been able to find
any surgeons in Canada that have operated on this injury specifically, which is important
to me because it’s not a small surgery and I need to feel 100% confident if I’m going
to go ahead with it. I do know of a few surgeons in the US but
it’s just too much of an undertaking right now to try and set that all up. I’m also planning to go traveling early next
year which complicates things further, so I do plan on getting the surgery eventually
but it’s just something that I’ve had to put on the shelf for now until the time is right. But as a result of this injury, I have not
been able to do any free weight pressing whatsoever for the past seven years. No dumbbell presses, no bench press, no overhead
press and I’m also really limited on triceps as well, I can’t do any close grip pressing,
no narrow grip dips, no overhead extensions, the only exercise I can really do for triceps
are rope push downs if I angle myself just right and I keep the loads on the more moderate
side. For chest what I can do are pressing movements
using cables, for some reason that doesn’t cause the snapping. Certain machine presses using moderate weight
I can also do, and then I can do fly movements as well. And for shoulders lateral raises and face
bowls are fine but no overhead pressing, again, unless it’s using cables. And for somebody who’s a bit of a perfectionist
and who really does enjoy training, this injury has been extremely frustrating for me at times. To go from 130 pound flat dumbbell presses
and 105 pound overhead dumbbell presses to these just lightweight cable presses and these
little fly movements and stuff, really sucks, but I’ve just done the best I can. And I’ve tried to stay as consistent as I
can and to work around the injury and to just try and not complain about it. And fortunately even though I can’t train
the way that I want to in the gym, in terms of muscle building aesthetics, the exercises
that I can do have still been enough to keep my chest and my delts and my triceps in a
shape that I’m happy with. Now, in terms of how I frame this all in my
mind in order to keep going forward even with a nagging injury like this, there’s a few
things that I find helpful. The first thing is very simple, and that’s
to just accept the situation as it is and accept that things are the way they are. You can sit there and you can complain and
wish it with some other way, or think you know what if this or what if that, but ultimately
the present moment is what it is. This is how things happen to unfold and there’s
nothing you can do to change that. And the only thing you can do is take the
variables that are in front of you right now and make the best decisions that you can moving
forward. But dwelling on it, feeling sorry for yourself,
or whatever, that’s not productive, so you just have to step up pull your shoulders back
and just press forward as best you can. Secondly, what I find helpful is to actually
think of it as sort of a challenge. It’s a lot easier to stay on track with things
and strive for your goals when everything is going perfectly smoothly and perfectly
according to plan, but it’s a lot harder to keep focused and motivated when things aren’t
going your way. And that’s one of the main reasons why so
many people fail to achieve their goals in the long run, not just with fitness but with
pretty much any area of life, because as soon as one thing goes off track they get discouraged
and they just end up slowly self-destructing. So, I try to kind of frame it as a test that’s
being thrown at me and think most other people are gonna quit when something like this happens,
and the reason why I’m gonna succeed is because I’m gonna handle it differently. I’m not gonna go off course, I’m gonna do
the very best with what I have in front of me right now. And ultimately when I do succeed, then it’ll
be even more satisfying knowing that I overcame these certain roadblocks in order to get there. Thirdly, is to just keep things in perspective
and realize that even if you do have an injury, if you’re able to train, if you’re able to
go into the gym and push yourself and lift and move your body and make progress, things
could always be way, way worse. So I just try to be grateful that I’m able
to lift, period, and be thankful for the stuff that I am able to do in the gym rather than
focusing on what I can’t do. Because it’s really all relative and if a
situation arose where I wasn’t able to lift anymore at all, then I’d look back at my current
situation and I’d give anything just to be back here. So as humans we tend to have this negativity
bias where we focus on the things we lack and then we just take for granted the things
that we do have, so when you’re injured I think it’s important to try and flip that
around and actively look for the positives in your situation rather than dwelling on
the negatives. Another thing is to just realize that you’re
not alone, because most people’s training isn’t perfect, at least not in the long run. If you’re committing to this for the long
haul and you’re moving recently heavy weights, and you’re looking to build you know some
decent muscle and strength, you’re gonna have injuries along the way, it’s very rare to
see a serious lifter out there who hasn’t struggled with some kind of injury at some
point. So it’s easy to just look at other people
and see their online highlight reel or look at other people in the gym and just feel like
everyone else is perfectly healthy and has no issues they’re dealing with, but that’s
obviously not the reality. So if you’re struggling with an injury, just
remember that you aren’t the only one. It largely comes with the territory. And most people are dealing with something
in their own training and if not now then they probably will at some point. And then the last thing is to keep in mind
that unless you’re dealing with a really serious injury, usually there is a way to work around
things in the gym if you really put in the time and effort to figure out how. Now, if your goals are purely strength related
then that’s going to be a bit different, I mean, in my situation, for example, with my
elbow injury, there’s no possible way for me to do heavy free weight pressing right
now. But from a pure muscle building standpoint,
there’s a lot you can do to maintain your gains and to even continue progressing even
if you do have an injury of some kind. For example, a cable press like I mentioned
before, that might sound like kind of a wimpy exercise but ultimately as long as you can
put the targeted muscle under tension through a decent range of motion using the right movement
pattern and you can apply progressive overload to that movement in some way, you’re ultimately
going to build muscle from it. It might not be ideal but it will still produce
results. So try to find other exercise variations you
can do without discomfort. You can alter the range of motion a bit, you
can use lighter weight and higher reps, you can test out different angles, usually there
is a way to get the job done if you just put your mind to it. Now, safety obviously comes first, so make
sure to get things checked out, don’t do anything stupid in the gym, if there’s pain and obviously
you do need to scale back, but if you get creative with your training then you should
still be able to find a way to progress, or at the very least maintain your gains while
you get the injury treated. So I’ll leave it there, guys. I hope this gave a bit of insight into my
current situation and some mindset advice that you can apply for yourself. The bottom line here is don’t expect your
training to be perfect, don’t expect your life to be perfect for that matter, obstacles
and setbacks and messiness are inevitable, and you just kind of have to roll with the
punches and deal with whatever variables are in front of you for moment to moment in the
best way that you can. So I hope this was helpful. Hit that like button and leave a comment if
it was. Subscribe to the channel if you’re new. The official web sites are over at www.SeanNal.com,
that’s where you can read through my blog articles and access my programs. www.RealScienceAthletics.com is where you
can check out my new science-based supplement formulas. And you can follow me on Instagram and Facebook
as well for more daily tips and updates, the links for that are also in the description
box. Thanks for watching, guys. And I’ll see you in the next video.