Fractures and Tendon Muscle Joint Injuries

Fractures and Tendon Muscle Joint Injuries


Marine Online this section should give a short introduction to fractures tendon muscle and joint injuries handling and transport you the framework of the body is called the skeleton and consists of approximately 220 bones these bones are connected with joints tendons and muscles injuries to the bones are called fractures fractures are caused by direct force or pressure stretching blowing overloading twisting you definitive fracture is visible pieces of bone open fracture angulation visible shortening of a limb and crepitation indication of a fracture is swelling Payne malfunction and paleness you stabilizing the fractured area is done too locations to relieve pain so the transportation can be carried out fast and gently click on the hot spots to see what a good spin should and should not do professional splints are inflatable splint cardboard splint stretch tension splint Sager splint vacuum splint Cramer splint if you don’t have any of these splints available use your imagination a good splint should not prevent adequate blood Galatian compressed nerves chill or heat the injured area or have sharp pointed edges a good splint must be adequately stiff or rigid be long enough to extend beyond the injured area immobilize the joint over and under the injury and be padded sprained an acute tendon muscle or joint injury is the result of the tissue being for a short moment exposed to a greater force or more pressure than it can endure for example caused by push thrust or blow the extent of the damage depends on the type of tissue its elasticity etc compared to the force it is exposed to the objective of first aid treatment for this type of damage is to reduce pain prevent swelling and reduce the length of the healing process sprain injuries have to a logic same symptoms as a fracture therefore in many cases it may be difficult to tell one from the other if in doubt whether the injury is a sprain or fracture always treat as a fracture the symptoms are Payne decreased mobility swelling and change of color such as blue yellow or purple treatment a sprain injury should be treated according to the RIC II principle rest ice compression elevation this all-round treatment is always for the best of the patient giving pain relief and favorable healing for injuries to larger muscles it is more important to use pressure to the area rather than cooling because the cooling effect will not be absorbed deep enough the letters are I see II mean the following R is the first letter of rest rest means to rest and protect the injured area for the first 24 to 48 hours and to stop activity that causes pain and soreness I is the first letter of ice ice means reduce bleeding reduce swelling and relieve pain see is the first letter of impression this is most important during the first 24 hours compression is done to reduce bleeding and to reduce swelling it is important to observe the blood circulation below the injured area E is the first letter of elevation elevation is done to relieve pain and to improve blood circulation transporting a patient and choice of evacuation or transport method will always depend on the following how much time a disposal available material available personnel type at extent of the injury access to and from place of injury require treatment during the transport there are several methods on how to hand and transport a person we will now take a closer look at the most used methods the injured person is raised to a half sitting position and the rescuer grasps around his wrists the rescuer stands up and can now drag the patient this is no gentle way of transport but it is a fast and effective way of moving an injured person out of a dangerous area the method is relatively easy to practice and an effective way of moving heavy patients it may be difficult to open doors or move objects as the rescuer does not have his hands-free the basis of this lifting method is the drag method number one rescuer stands behind the injured person grasping his wrist number two rescuer takes hold of the injured persons thighs as close to his crotch as possible lifting each leg this is a relatively gentle and safe method of transport where the rescuers at all times can see where they are going this method should not be used if the injured person has fractures and an unconscious patient may easily get his Airways blocked you a well-known lifting method useful when the patient is conscious and able to cooperate this is the fastest method of moving a patient in addition the rescuer has one hand free to open doors move obstacles etc once the patient is up on your shoulders this is an easy way of transport that you must keep in mind that this is not a gentle way of transport this method is safe fast easy and a good way to put a patient onto a stretcher it requires four to five helpers who can lift the patient don’t forget the patient’s head if the patient is unconscious the head will roll sideways unless someone is responsible for securing the head this person should be the one giving the command okay lift so that everyone lifts at the same time one person shall push the stretcher under the patient if the patient has a back injury this is a good way to handle the patient when a scoop stretcher is not available it is very important that everyone lifts at the same time this is the most common used lifting method when placing an injured person on a stretcher the bearers three persons should kneel on the left side of the injured one bearers should be in command and he shall concentrate on the patient’s head neck and shoulders all three bearers shall lift the injured at the same time a fourth helper moving the stretcher under the injured with this lifting method there is very little movement of the patient’s body this method should not be used when moving a patient with counter stretcher you the first aider must at all times consider his own health and safety he can be of no help if he jeopardizes his own safety this means using correct lifting methods whenever possible some lifting operations may have to be carried out within very narrow passages and severe working conditions the following rules must be practiced whenever possible plan the lift and transport try to get help from others before lifting evaluate if the patient can be placed in a better more comfortable position keep your back straight lift your head and look straight ahead lift using your legs

Ankle Fracture Surgery | Nucleus Health

Ankle Fracture Surgery | Nucleus Health


If a person breaks their ankle, and the bones
no longer line up with each other, a doctor may need to perform a surgical procedure to
reposition and secure the bones. The ankle is the joint that connects the leg and the
foot. The ankle joint includes the two lower leg bones called the tibia and fibula, and
the ankle bone called the tailus. Together, the end of the tibia and fibula create a whartos
or “slot” for the talus which forms the bottom of the ankle joint. Tissues called
ligaments and tendons support the ankle bones. Ligaments attach bones to bones, and tendons
attach muscles to bones. The ankle joint allows the foot to move up and down. Ankle injuries
usually happen during athletic activities, falls, or car accidents. The most common type
of ankle fracture occurs when the foot turns inward, and the ankle rotates outward. If
the fracture is stable, the pieces of bone still line up in their normal position. In
any type of fracture, more than one bone may break. In a displaced fracture, the pieces
of bone no longer line up. If bone breaks through the skin, it’s known as a compound
or “open” fracture. In addition to broken bones, the ankle may be sprained. This means
the ligaments have been stretched or torn. If the ankle is very swollen, the surgeon
may delay a surgical procedure to allow the swelling to go down. During this time, the
surgeon may put the ankle in a splint to provide support. During this time, the surgeon may
recommend elevating the ankle above the level of the heart and applying ice to it. To treat
a stable ankle fracture, the healthcare provider may put the leg in a cast or a boot to keep
the ankle from moving so that the bones can heal together. Displaced and compound fractures
with multiple broken bones and torn ligaments may require a surgical procedure. The most
common surgical procedure to repair a displaced open fracture is called an open reduction
with internal fixation. To begin, the surgeon will make an incision over the area of the
fracture. The surgeon will open up the area to feel the pieces of bone and line them back
up with each other. A plate and screws will be used to keep them aligned. Additional screws
may be inserted through another incision to hold other fracture fragments in place. If
the ligaments holding the tibia and fibula together are severly damaged, the surgeon
will place a screw through both bones, or a suture device may be placed through both
bones. Either of these devices will help hold the bones together while the ligaments heal.
At the end of the procedure, the surgeon will close any skin incisions with stitches.

“This Relief Came In Time” after Hurricane Dorian

“This Relief Came In Time” after Hurricane Dorian


Today we are here with Direct Relief. The
donations that came in for the persons down at our hospitals in Grand Bahama
and our connection in Abaco. This relief came in time and very very timely
because Direct Relief knows exactly what we needed and all of the medical and
surgical and pharmaceutical items are on point. They are going to bring relief to
the people of Grand Bahama and Abaco and so on behalf of the Bahamas government
as all of the people in the Bahamas, we say thank you very much for much needed supplies that will go a long way in bringing relief to our patients and
institutions.

How to Better Treat Trauma Injuries in the Developing World

How to Better Treat Trauma Injuries in the Developing World


bjbj”9″9 RAY SUAREZ: Modern machinery has
caused a spike in injuries in the developing world. Now, a hospital in San Francisco aims
to train doctors to treat them. NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels has our story. And a warning:
This story does contains some graphic images. SPENCER MICHELS: In recent years, the number
of motorized vehicles on the roads in developing countries has skyrocketed, and so have the
accidents. DR. RICK COUGHLIN, University of California, San Francisco: We know that the
global impact of injury in road traffic crashes is more than HIV, T.B., malaria combined.
Did you know that? No one knows that. And yet that’s the case. SPENCER MICHELS: Rick
Coughlin, an orthopedic surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco, is on a crusade
to improve the care of those who sustain traumatic injuries in the developing world. DR. RICK
COUGHLIN: Anyone who goes to a foreign country, a developing-world country, your fear isn’t
that you’re going to get HIV. Your fear is that you’re going to be in a car accident
and your leg is going to be exposed, and you’re — you’re in trouble now. SPENCER MICHELS:
For the last four years, Dr. Coughlin has been spearheading a unique program which brings
orthopedic surgeons from low-income countries around the world to San Francisco, to one
of the country’s leading trauma hospitals, San Francisco General. MAN: And everyone has
got covers. SPENCER MICHELS: Five surgeons from Kenya and Tanzania recently arrived for
a week of training and hands-on experience, learning the most up-to-date surgical techniques.
Dr. Nedford Ongaro is one of only 70 orthopedic surgeons in all of Kenya, a country of more
than 40 million people. He says lack of supplies contributes to dangerous delays in treating
traumatic injuries. DR. NEDFORD ONGARO, Nigeria: We do not talk like surgical implants or surgical
resources, so we give a prescription, someone has to go to buy hardware. That can take several
days. So this accessibility is quite limited. And really that increases the burden, perhaps
infections. People can lose limbs. And they don’t get back to work that quickly. So they
have quite morbidity. SPENCER MICHELS: While accurate numbers are hard to come by, the
World Health Organization estimates that for every person killed by traumatic injury, somewhere
between 10 to 50 times more suffer non-fatal injuries, which often require advanced medical
care. Without that care, the risk of amputation increases dramatically. DR. RICK COUGHLIN:
The global burden or global impact of amputation is quite enormous. There are enormous numbers
of what we call open injuries, where the bone, especially lower leg injuries, the lower leg
bones get exposed to the air, the dirt, become contaminated. And the soft tissue surrounding
those bones are injured. And now the bones are exposed. And in that capacity, if we can
teach the surgeons how to cover these exposed bones in an expeditious fashion, then we eliminate
the cycle of going down the path of infection, soft tissue infection, bone infection. And
then the only salvage is an amputation. MAN: The biggest issue with osteotomies is that
you have some bone missing because, if you use a saw, it takes a tiny bit of bone away.
SPENCER MICHELS: On the day we visited, the surgeons from Africa were practicing on the
elbow bone of a cadaver and the soft tissue around it. And they were learning how to drill
and insert sophisticated orthopedic pins in artificial bones. Dr. Edmund Eliezer from
Tanzania says the training he’s received, especially in techniques to prevent amputations,
has saved more than limbs. DR. EDMUND ELIEZER, Tanzania: Most of the times, these patients
are the ones who are taking care of the families. So with the two legs, life is difficult. Now
you can imagine, with the only remaining one leg, life would be very difficult. SPENCER
MICHELS: In much of Africa rural hospitals have few supplies. Heavy stones are sometimes
used as traction devices. But both Dr. Ongaro and Eliezer work in the capital cities in
their countries in fairly well-equipped hospitals. Still, they say, they are having a hard time
caring for the rising number of road traffic injuries. DR. RICK COUGHLIN: So this is a
mutual exchange. SPENCER MICHELS: And, for his part, Dr. Coughlin says one main goal
is to simply spread the message that traumatic injuries in the developing world are not getting
the attention they deserve. DR. RICK COUGHLIN: Why? Because HIV has the lobbying power and
infection disease people have the lobbying power. I have no doubt in my mind that we
are undersupplied, underfunded for research in this regard. SPENCER MICHELS: The Kenyan
and Tanzanian doctors say they will share the techniques and skills they have learned
during their week in San Francisco with colleagues back home. With just over 100 orthopedic surgeons
in their two countries, serving a total of 80 million people, this program is admittedly
a small step. But doctors here say they expect what they call a multiplier effect to spread
the training to other surgeons in the developing world. RAY SUAREZ: Last year, the United Nations
launched the Decade of Action for Road Safety, which aims to prevent the loss of more than
a million lives each year by 2020. gdvb :pvb urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags
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I Tried Medical Marijuana For My Chronic Pain

I Tried Medical Marijuana For My Chronic Pain


(heavy breathing)
(crying) – My name’s Kelsey and most of you know me as the loud mouth, no filtered, boss ass bitch producer
from Buzzfeed, which I am, but something that very
few people know about me is that I suffer from a
neuropathic, chronic pain condition know as Trigeminal Neuralgia, or TN. The Trigeminal nerve is a
nerve located within the brain. It’s primarily responsible
for transmitting sensation from the brain to the face. TN is a type of neuropathic pain. A type of pain that can occur when nerves are damaged or injured. In the medical field, Trigeminal Neuralgia is considered to be one of the worst pains known to mankind,
sending excruciating pain throughout the face, head, and jaw. The pain of TN is
comparable to severe burns, childbirth, and even the
bite of a bullet ant. (crying) – Don’t, don’t, I’m okay. – At one point, TN was
nicknamed the suicide disease because people who suffer
from this would take their own lives because of
the severity of the pain. Because of the pain, I’ve
had multiple surgeries to try and fix it, along
with expensive medications, therapies, treatments,
injections, acupunctures. I just had Botox injected
all across my forehead, into my scalp and jawline to
try and help with the pain. You can kind of see the bruising. I mean that costs $1,200
just to get this area done. You name it, I have tried it. Well, I have tried almost everything. (upbeat music) Recently, I’ve heard news
stories and read articles about marijuana helping chronic pain. I am at a point in my pain and in my life where I can’t take it
anywhere and I’m willing to try anything. I don’t smoke weed. Anymore. Something you should know about me, I smoked weed back in high school and then once I got older, I kind of started having really adverse reactions
to it, and just quit. Though I may not be a smoker anymore, I know that there’s hundreds
of strains of cannabis, so I needed to know exactly
what I was looking for. So I decided to a really
smart place at UCLA and talk to a really
fancy doctor about it. – There’s pretty strong evidence that whole leaf marijuana, or extracts of it, can be helpful for nerve pain. Chronic pain, but specifically nerve pain. Is the strongest evidence. – Wait a minute there, doc. Just how far back does this evidence go? There are records from 2900 BCE of Chinese Emperor Fu
Hsi stating marijuana possesses yin and yang. Around 1000 BCE in Ancient India, cannabis was combined with milk to drink as an anesthetic. The Ancient Greek doctor Galen would use cannabis to treat flatulence and pain. The Mexican Revolution
of 1910 brought many Mexican immigrants to
the US who introduced Americans to the recreational use of weed. The Great Depression
increased racial tension which caused the public
demand for government to crack down on marijuana use. Marijuana was then associated
with lower class communities. So basically for forever,
marijuana use wasn’t seen negatively until an influx of immigrants and racial tension caused
it to be criminalized, causing it to lose its
historical association with medicine. But, back to Dr. Strouse telling me something that blew my mind. – It’s not at all clear that THC alone has much pain-relieving affect. – Oh. Gonna be on the hunt, not for weed, but something called CBD oil, which is actually THC free. What is the difference
between CBD and THC? – The psychoactive part of marijuana, the part that gets you high, is THC. – Right. – CBD does not tend to make people feel high or intoxicated, that
there’s a balance there that a roughly one to
one mix sort of makes it easier for people to get a pain relief without that highness
that at least some people experience as unpleasant. – What? Why don’t these teach us this
kind of shit in high school? That there’s a weed out
there that I can smoke and not get high. Today I’m gonna go try
and get my weed card. I’m actually walking to a place that’s on the corner of my street, because in Los Angeles,
these places are everywhere. So you can’t just go
to your regular doctor to get a marijuana card,
you have to go to a doctor that specializes in medical
marijuana evaluations. So, got the paper, and the card. It took what, how long? – [Man] Like five seconds. – Like five seconds. So literally I sat in a
room and a nurse brought in a computer screen and
a guy on the other side was on Skype and I told
him what was wrong with me and he said, “Great, I’m gonna
give you a recommendation.” It was very sketchy but super easy. So I had my card and now I knew what I was kind of looking for, so now I just needed to go to a dispensary. Dispensaries just like a store for weed. (upbeat music) – My name is Allen, we’re
at WHTC in Studio City. You know, we’re not doctors, so, we really work with the patients to see what’s bothering them,
what their ailments are, and how we could help them. – So I notice you’re
using the word “patients.” – Yes. – [Kelsey] Explain what that means. – A lot of people say
customers, it’s that, no, we’re a medical marijuana dispensary. Everyone here is a patient. They went to a doctor, they have a– – Medical marijuana card, I just got one. – Medical marijuana
card, which is actually their prescription or their
doctor’s recommendation, saying that they can come in here and that they have an ailment that
requires medical marijuana. We see a wide variety of patients, dealing with all sorts of ailments. Anywhere from Crohn’s, diabetes, neuropathy, fibromyalgia, and chemo and cancer patients, absolutely. – Right. And people know about cancer. A lot people don’t know about, like, the anxiety that it can
with, or depression, or other “invisible illnesses.” – CBD’s very helpful because
it’s an anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, anti-arthritis. – So, what is the most popular
medicine you sell here? – Between flowers,
edibles, and concentrates– – Wait, flowers? – Flowers, as in medical marijuana. – [Kelsey] Okay, I was like, “What?” – So yeah, we refer to that as flower, then you have concentrate, which is also know an oil. Then we have topicals and
tinctures and edibles, so there’s top sellers
within every market. There’s just a wide variety. – Now it’s time to get to schmokin’. I just left the dispensary
and I’m actually feeling like, insanely optimistic. I’m in the parking lot at work, and I’m gonna just try
one of these things now ’cause I can’t wait to get home, so. I’m going to use this stick. – Another popular method,
especially for neuropathy, is topicals. – [Kelsey] Lotion. – [Allen] Lotion, exactly. – Oh. Oh wow, that’s very nice. Ah, god, that feels so good. It definitely smells
like kind of, Icy Hot. It has this weird cooling. So it’s been about two hours since I used the roll on stick. My muscles feel so relaxed. I still have a lot of the tightness where the nerve damage is. As far as the muscles in
my actual jaws and temple, oh my god, it’s like no
amount of physical therapy has given me relief for this long. – When people hear CBD, they
don’t know what CBD looks like, but if you’re looking
at it from a raw form. This would be our Mai Tai Cookies, and this has actually won first place at the High Time Cannabis
Cup for best CBD flower. – I was also really
nervous to try the flower. It tastes like pot. Because it reminded me of what I smoked in high school to get really high. When I used to smoke weed,
I just knew about two kinds: mids and dro. How much should I smoke? This is weird. I don’t know, I don’t trust this. Jesus fuck. Okay, so, I’ll let that settle in. But I was nervous for nothing. It turns out it was really great, and the thing I loved
most about the flowers was that it helped me the
most out of all the methods with my headaches so, anyone who suffers from chronic migraines, I would highly recommend this product. We see those things on Facebook, those videos where
someone’s having some sort of seizure or convulsion and they’re given some weed, whether
through a pen or a dose, and then five minutes later,
they’re totally normal. If we have proof like
that, why is the research still so, I don’t know,
underfunded, or shunned upon? – I’m gonna sound like a nerdy doctor and try to answer this question. – Please do, that’s why we’re here. – I apologize. But, you know, I’ve seen
some of those amazing video footage, for example,
the kids with these horrible epilepsy problems who go to Colorado, who
get Charlotte’s Web. – Right, we’ve all heard it. – That looks very compelling, and I think the fact that it’s so compelling and there’s so many
really moving testimonials by parents is why there
are now clinical trials being done with CBD by major university medical center neurology,
epilepsy specialists. – So we’re moving in the right direction? – [Dr. Strouse] We are, we are. – Okay, so it’s 6:30 on a Friday night, and while everyone else is going out and doing shit, I can
barely function as a human. The only thing that I can equate it to is like red hot fire ants
just biting your face and no matter what you
do, you can’t stop it. So, I’m going to try Black Medicated Rub. One CBD to THC, it doesn’t
really say how much to take, so I just took that. Oh my god, it smells so good. Let this settle in. It kind of looks like I just have a really poppin’ gloss on. – It’s a process. Start very small the first night, see how that affected you. Take note. Moving forward, you adjust. – So it’s been about 30 minutes
and I don’t feel anything, so we’re gonna take it up a notch. Gonna use this pen. What do you find to be the most popular? – The vape cartridge,
which is really quick. This is like almost instant relief. You vape it, and within a minute, you’re probably gonna feel the effects. – Delicious. Yo, I still cannot get over
the fact that I am a vape bro. It’s also considered to be
one of the healthiest ways to ingest cannabis,
’cause you’re not smoking any chemicals or papers. It was fast, it was easy,
it was by far the most convenient way to ingest the cannabis, but its effects didn’t last very long. So if you’re gonna try this method, I would suggest bringing it with you wherever you go, or getting a
higher concentrate in the pen. I’d read online that
people had a lot of success with tinctures, so I
bought a variety of kinds with various amounts of CBD and THC. Was pricey at $60, but hey,
willing to try anything. They were the most expensive
method that I tried, and none of them really worked for me. I don’t feel shit. About halfway through, I
think after repeatedly failing with the tinctures, I really
started to get depressed. (slow music) I just got done with one of
my doctor’s appointments. The appointment is $195 for a 20 minute appoinemtnt for someone to tell you
it’s trial and error and shit may or may not work. These specialist kinds of doctors aren’t covered by insurance and they have to get paid because the work that they’re doing is so underfunded. Of course they have to charge a bunch ’cause all of this shit
is so experimental. The idea that medical
marijuana is something that you can keep in your home, it’s at my disposal whenever I want it, I can take it whenever I want it. That would be like a fucking miracle, ’cause I am so sick of these
fucking doctor’s appointments. But then I think medical marijuana maybe that is the best option to even try first. I don’t know, it’s starting to
really fuckin’ fuck with me. Is the legalization of marijuana kind of undermining the
use of it as medicine, too? Like, are people afraid
that if medical marijuana becomes kind of the norm, will people stop going to see doctors, will people stop writing prescriptions, will the pharmaceutical world collapse? Is that a concern? – Though yes, my hunches may be there are people concerned about that, at another level people,
many people are worried about how responsible is big
marijuana gonna be, right? Big marijuana, like big tobacco, which until whatever year it was, 1982, was telling us that cigarettes
didn’t cause lung cancer. So it’s a huge business opportunity here and they’re going for it
and so, in whose interest will that business development be? Marijuana’s still illegal according to the Controlled Substances Act
of the federal government. It’s simply to work with the organizations that the federal government sustains, is really complicated and bureaucratic and that’s one of the reasons
why there’s so much anger. – Right, around it. – Around it. – ‘Cause then it becomes
like a government thing. We’re letting the government
control whether or not people can get better. While there is research being done, the US is so far behind
compared to other countries. There are still so many
states where this is illegal, and there is a stigma of that hippy stoner, vibe attached to this medicine. I could not imagine
living in a state where I needed this to function
and then potentially having to go to a job where they drug test and not being able to take my medicine. I want people to watch this video and rethink their relationship and their opinions on marijuana. To cheer myself up, I
decided to take an edible which I have heard so many horror stories where people have eaten
it, don’t feel anything, they eat more, and then
like two hours later, they’re melting into the wall. So I made my roommate
try it with me, and guys, this was the one time
that I got super high. And we also made some
brownies and just laughed and I got nothing done, I
couldn’t even blog about it. I just realized that that method is not practical for my lifestyle. Last minute I decided to add
one more thing to the test. This was a medication that
I had talked to Dr. Strouse about, it’s called Charlotte’s Web. So they can actually sell
it to any state in America because it’s considered hemp, and not cannabis. This one I’m really excited to try because this is the kind of strain that we see in those Facebook videos. They recommend that you use
this and kind of integrate it into part of your diet so
they’re saying it might not work the first time,
maybe it does for some people, but it’s something that
you should do daily. Mmm, it tastes like mint chocolate chip. Charlotte’s Web. Oh my god, Charlotte’s Web. I promise, despite the look of my hair, I’m doing much better today. I actually slept, like, some of the best sleep
I’ve slept in a long time, which, to have a pain free
sleep night is pretty rare. So I’m gonna start using this a lot more. It took a couple days of
tinkering with the amounts to figure out what was most
effective, but I highly recommend any chronic pain
patients to try this first. Even though it’s $150 a bottle, which lasted me about a month, it was worth every penny. When I started this
journey, I think the thing I was most afraid of was, would ingesting the
cannabis affect my energy or my ability to function
or my personality? When in reality, I was
able to sleep better, and my headaches were less frequent, which gave me more energy. I just so badly want
others to be able to have the chance to experience what I did. What’s it gonna take for that to happen? Is it like a big company
backing medicinal marijuana? What is it gonna take? Is it money? Is it more signatures? I don’t know, what? – Well I think for us to do, for example, this kind of research in
the VA, a federal entity, would probably require a repeal of the Federal Controlled Substances Act. – If you get anything from this video, know that it’s, chronic pain sufferers don’t just want your sympathy. They want your support and your action. I put some links below to organizations that are working all across the country to reform medical marijuana laws as well as some resources for
chronic pain sufferers. I want to give a huge shout
out and thanks to WHTC, UCLA, and the Facial
Pain Research Foundation. And if you’re a sufferer, I
just wanna say, don’t give up. Keep trying different methods. Talk to your doctor, make
them listen to your concerns. Tell them about cannabis,
talk to them about cannabis. I am happy to have found an
alternative to prescription pills or opiates because a lot of times that’s the first option chronic
pain sufferers are given. And for people like me,
whose condition doesn’t even react to opiates, this
has been an incredibly life changing experience. I’ve been so happy to
be educated about this and learn more about how my body reacts to medical marijuana so
that I’m not so nervous or afraid of it anymore. I’m gonna keep using the CBD roll-on stick and I use the Charlotte’s Web everyday, but I’m not gonna stop trying things. This is definitely not the solution. It’s not over. And just seeing the widespread acceptance of this plant as medicine, makes me feel incredibly excited and optimistic about chronic pain. For the first time ever. (upbeat music)

Celox Rapid training video – Military emergency response (USA & FDA regions)

Celox Rapid training video – Military emergency response (USA & FDA regions)


Introducing Celox Rapid. The fastest hemostatic
gauze for moderate to severe hemorrhage. Uncontrolled hemorrhage remains the main cause
of death on the modern battlefield. 80% of preventable battlefield deaths are
due to bleeding. And is consistent in studies from recent conflicts
in Iraq and Afghanistan. Since those conflicts servicemen have been
issued with better ballistic protection but hemorrhage still accounts for a large proportion
of potentially preventable deaths. Stopping a severe bleed can challenge even
experienced medics. Help is often too far away or the casualty
bleeds to death before help arrives. In some situations, severe bleeding can lead
to exsanguination in under 5 minutes. Fast and effective treatment is needed to
save lives. Celox is proven to stop severe bleeding fast
and is trusted by militaries, emergency services and health professionals the world over.
Celox gauze is approved by the CoTCCC for compressible hemorrhage not amenable to tourniquet
use or as an adjunct to tourniquet removal. The next generation Celox Rapid is the fastest
acting hemostatic gauze and the only agent that can stop severe bleeding with only 60
seconds of compression. Not only does Celox reduce the total treatment
time it also packs faster. It’s 5 foot length fills the same volume as competitive 12-foot
hemostatic gauze products, but it reduces the packing time. Saving over 2 minutes from
start to finish. In independent tests Celox rapid was demonstrated
successfully in laboratory coagulopathic testing. Some hemostatic agents work by accelerating
the body’s own clotting factors, but these can become compromised in severely bleeding
casualties. Celox is different. It works independent of
the bloods intrinsic clotting mechanism. Celox works physically at the source of bleeding.
With Chito-R activated chitosan Celox Rapid swells and gels to form a coherent pseudo
clot and stops life-threatening arterial and venous bleeding with 60 seconds compression.
Celox Rapid is presented in a lightweight low cube foil pack that has a 5-year shelf
life and no allergies reported to date. The following training video is a guide to
using Celox Rapid to pack a wound according to the product indications and packaging instructions.
When responding to a casualty it’s important to identify massive hemorrhage as soon as
possible. Gain control of the bleeding.
Fully expose the wound, identify the point of bleeding and apply direct pressure to stem
the flow. If blood has pooled in the wound removed the
excess using plain gauze, swabs or whatever material is available.
Celox Rapid is indicated for moderate to severe bleeding.
Familiarize yourself with the products packaging, it has a tear notch at each corner.
While maintaining pressure on the open wound open the pack and remove Celox Rapid from
the packaging. Take one end and begin to pack the wound directly
onto the source of bleeding, maintaining pressure at all times.
Continue packing the wound feeding in the Celox Rapid gauze until the wound cavity is
filled beyond the skin level. For larger wounds that are not filled up by
a single Celox Rapid use an additional plain gauze or another Celox Rapid to fill above
the skin level. As soon as the wound is packed, using two
hands with fingers interlocked apply firm constant pressure for 60 seconds.
Slowly visually check for bleeding around the dressing while still maintaining pressure.
If bleeding has not stopped reapply pressure for an additional one minute.
If necessary, tear off excess Celox Rapid before securing the dressing in place, but
the gauze should still be proud of the skin. Wrap the wound using bandaging or a pressure
dressing to secure the dressing in place. Maintain pressure at all times.
Remember to bandage tightly to maintain direct pressure through to the hemostatic.
Record that Celox Rapid has been used in the wound for the next stage of care.
Check periodically and reassess the wound for bleeding until reaching the next stage
of care. Remember to follow these steps when applying
Celox Rapid: Identify massive hemorrhage.
Use proximal pressure to gain control of the bleeding.
Expose the wound. Identify the point of bleeding and apply direct
pressure. Swab excess blood.
Pack onto the source of bleeding. Apply firm pressure for one minute.
If bleeding continues reapply pressure for an additional one minute.
Secure with a dressing. Extricate the casualty.
Celox Rapid is presented in a lightweight low cube foil pack that has a 5 year shelf
life and no allergies reported to date. It works with only 60 seconds compression
stopping life-threatening bleeding fast. The technology has been proven successful
in coagulopathic tests and stops hypothermic bleeding.
Celox Rapid the fastest hemostatic gauze for moderate to severe hemorrhage.
Stop bleeding. Save lives.

Trapped and Injured – Chicago Med (Episode Highlight)

Trapped and Injured – Chicago Med (Episode Highlight)


♪♪ -You okay?
-I’m fine. -How’s the boy? -Sats are down to 82. -What about your shoulder? -It’s all right.
I’m fine. ♪♪ ♪♪ -Got it?
-Yeah. [ Winces ] ♪♪ -Wait. Stop. Let me see if I can pry open
another window. -I told you, I’m fine. -Natalie, hold on.
You don’t have to be a hero. -Ow. -Come on! What do you want
to do, damage the nerve? -I don’t need your medical
advice, Will.