8 Feb 2018 news today – benefit, relief mental health advice and news


hi I’m Andy Bailey from and the Emmys
video diary walking and talking v-log on Facebook and on YouTube and E and M s
that’s where you see me that’s where you find me come along and you’ll be part my
community now every morning I have Google Alerts go off well I shouldn’t
come into my inbox and tell me about certain things to do with multiple
sclerosis depression anxiety those kind of things so I can keep up to date with
what goes on in those things these are some of the things that have caught my
eye this morning we’ve got the social care system is in crisis okay with
patients receiving 15-minute visits what the hell are you gonna do with 15
minutes forget about it oh dear see what are you gonna do with 15 minute things
what are you gonna do what are you gonna do what you’re gonna do come in come in
hey yeah we’re gonna talk okay bye and forget about it hmm
what are you gonna do with 15 minutes there are some people that are only
getting one minute visits please please that’s unacceptable there are these are
the most vulnerable people in our society they’re elderly the disabled the
the mentally healthfully challenged people the vulnerable people and they’re
not getting proper thing I can understand where the NHS is coming from
they’ve got a cut corn not cut corners but cut costs it’s the bottom line
because other people are telling them that but you can’t just look at the
price because look at the cost of that my friend says his mum my Polish friend
says his mom says cheap is expensive and that’s so true especially in this case
if you’re keeping it out on on the assessments on the care on the system
within and looks after the vulnerable people that’s gonna cost you in the
future in palliative care in depression for the
people that are the carers oh there’s so many though a ripple effect go now so
you take care of this you take care of a lot of the other things happen but they
can’t do that because that bits expensive to do
they don’t look ahead to see when it costs in the future the bean counters
talking about bean counters the DWP bean counters they’ve got to review 220,000
benefit claims so people with mental health conditions like autism depression
anxiety etc etc all those people those kind of things are gonna be reassessed
and that’s because dwb have just messed it up and talking of bean counters the
bean counters work out that how much does it cost to refuse you your pip and
how much does it cost to fight it in court and then how much will it cost if
they get told to do the proper job and they worked it out and the balance is
it’s cheaper for them to say screw off me oh you can’t have nothing and then
people like oh shit alright then because you know they might have mental health
anxiety and they don’t want to cause a fast and they’re too guilty about stuff
cos being stigmatized for having mental health problems mmm or do they know that
only a certain amount of people will appeal only a certain amount of people
will take you to court judges have ruled that most of these cases that come into
the court for appeal shouldn’t even have got to the appeal the police used a
Crown Prosecution Service system and if they don’t have the evidence you don’t
get taken to court that’s how it works for criminals that’s why the everybody
the knives everyone me because police have got to prove it before they any
even tell you to call different with the dwb a tox and independent Assessors
because it’s cheaper for them to say no because they know that a certain
percentage enough people will not appeal for it to be more profitable to say no
than it would be to just give you what you deserve and that’s just business
that’s how it works unfortunately that’s the that’s the game
so you’ve got to appeal especially if you’ve got mental health problems all
your caring for someone with mental health problems like autism depression
anxiety etc so stay on it good news there for you yeah now some good news
they could drinking four cups of coffee might help your ms well mines the
cappuccino of I said don’t do encapture anymore because the milk makes me fat
milk is basically baby cow growing juice they would grow baby cows with with milk
I have soy milk now cuz I’m a hippie can is help huh
but I knew that caffeine is supposed to be good for you either got a recipe from
Jamie Oliver how to make granola dust which I have everyday with vanilla
soymilk oh it’s gorgeous with some frozen fruit in Israel uh Aimee GERD
it’s so good so caffeine I put bear caffeine in my
granola as caffeine is supposed to be good for you I don’t
I’m not sure it can be as simple as against just having drinks of coffee but
you know puppy now I want to tell you about anxiety or overcoming a particular
period of anxiety this is really good this system is something that I use
constantly when I’m anxious in the mornings okay look at this try this if
you start to get me shaky there’s a woman she called Mel Robbins she wrote a
book called five four three two one the five-second rule she did the audiobook
as well listen to it I’ve read it is brilliant and she’s only telling you
stuff that you already know the best thing about it is she’s not inventing
anything new she’s using references to Harvard and to medical studies and stuff
and really is a good thing but she says something in one of her books about
anxiety she says if you ever been in the car as a passenger drive it doesn’t
matter and a card just misses you like you like internally externally whether
it shows all night doesn’t matter in turning your boom and your brains out
Wow I need weed I then fight or flight or it’s okay it’s over calm down calm
down everything’s go over this guy was it
gradually together now anxiety is like having that but it happened at the
kitchen sink just you and there is a disconnect there from what your brain
can see and experience and what you’re actually feeling the chemicals that have
been released in your brain the adrenaline the cortisone whatever it is
that gets released when you reveal like that so that’s what
anxiety is to her and it does make sense so if you ever get that kind of oh
here’s something that will help you because I used it loads and it does work
it really does it worth Gojo okay when you’re on your own and you’re feeling it
dumb at no one I know are you doing it right listen look find five things right
the you can see actually look at the things okay I can see a blind I see a
lighthouse thing for my VR exam I can see my audio mixer flashing there I can
see the bottle of water that I used to drink water and I can see an off monitor
I can see their things don’t just pluck things that are able to be seen but
things are you see right now it’s called grounding that’s part of mind for us
four things that you can touch you can reach out and touch I can reach out and
touch this mouse I can reach out and touch a keyboard I can reach out and
touch this cable feel what that cables I use mindfulness again I can reach out
and touch a vicks vapor nasal never I can imagine what it smells like
talkative things three things that you can hear right now that you can actually
feel the vibrations going into your brain I can hear the fan on the computer I can in the fridge downstairs gonna I can either rain outside hitting some
windows and we’re mindful things you can actually hear not things that can be
heard okay two things that you can smell I can smell the soap on my hands the
vanilla soap or lush I really like that so I like it a lot
well I can smell it is warm from the radiator it’s got that smell you know
yeah I know one thing that you can taste now this is something you could lick us
puros but i prefer something that can already taste cuz there’s always a
memory of something that i tasted before oh it’s the steamed veggies I had for
lunch I’ve tasted even the cheese right and that is the kind of thing the
mindfulness thing and that’s how you can reconnect and once you’ve done that you
realize you’re not anxious anymore just take five things five four three two one
just take a moment do it well worth it may I like it now good news if you have
a zit acne is increase risk of depression isn’t that good news they
would look I’m gonna spot oh good no the what they’re saying is within the
first five years about my acne you’re more likely to get depressed I remember
I got well sad and depressed one of those gonads is it actually I wasn’t I
was almost quite proud of that aspect we gonna draw a big circle ads are going
sit with a big arrow but when you get older is different and so now they’re
advising doctors in the first five years keep an eye out for depression and
depressive signs and people and GPS are trained to notify and notice these
things so those are the things that picked out in the news today I am loony
o of the geek fun I am Andy Bailey on M s video diary and Andy an MS on YouTube
and loony fun on some other streaming places by Mandy this has been the MS
news today this morning welcome see you later – louve did it oh I could do that
you know

How to Stockpile Prescription Medicines For Bugging Out /Stockpiling Medicine

How to Stockpile Prescription Medicines For Bugging Out /Stockpiling Medicine


how to stockpile prescription medicines for Bug Out Emergency Survival Situations stockpile medicines and prepper first aid supplies What would you do if you needed prescription medicine in an emergency or Bug Out situation? It doesn’t even need to be a Bug Out. If you take life sustaining medications and forgot them at home or were stranded overnight, what would you do? Make a plan to have prescription medicines you or family members depend on. Follow these tips on how to obtain extra prescription meds, where to store them, and how to rotate your prescription medicines. Never be caught in an emergency because you forgot to bring your prescription medication and risk an emergency survival situation. hi it’s AlaskaGranny do you take any kind of prescription medication medicine What would you do if you needed prescription medicine in an emergency or Bug Out situation? It doesn’t even need to be a Bug Out. or are you concerned that you have enough vitamins or supplements that you take daily well if you take a medical or health regime that you are on you need to make sure that you are storing some of your medication medicine in several places to make sure you always have the medicine you need have some of your prescription medicines in your Bug Out Bag your Get Home Bag your gym bag your car kit because in the event of an emergency you don’t know where you will be and if you are dependent upon medication medicine for you should be storing a few days supply of your medicine in each of these places medicine in critical areas then you need to figure out if the medicine is something that you don’t have extras of you need to speak to your medical professional doctor about how you can obtain extras so that you can have some on hand no matter what keep them in several places so your medication is always accessible to you if you have a life threatening situation if you do not have your medicine find a way to secure extras so that you can stash some medicine in places that you may have them if for some reason you can’t go home or you forgot to take one when you were at home make sure you never go with out life sustaining medication medicine think about every six months you need to rotate your extra stored medication medicine take the stored medicine out and replace them with your fresh supply you are using and restock your emergency kits with the medicines you need think where do I have medicine stored keep a list of where you have your extra medicine so you do not forget where you put it don’t be caught without life sustaining medication medicines in an emergency situation take one day to set this up that you have emergency medicine in important first aid kits and bug out bags and then rotate the medicine every six months make sure that you do not have a problem having enough of the medicines you need in any kind of situation What would you do if you needed prescription medicine in an emergency or Bug Out situation? It doesn’t even need to be a Bug Out. If you take life sustaining medications and forgot them at home or were stranded overnight, what would you do? Make a plan to have prescription medicines you or family members depend on. Follow these tips on how to obtain extra prescription meds, where to store them, and how to rotate your prescription medicines. Never be caught in an emergency because you forgot to bring your prescription medication and risk an emergency survival situation. please subscribe to AlaskaGranny channel alaskagranny.com

Child Care & First Aid : Getting a Newborn to Sleep Through the Night

Child Care & First Aid : Getting a Newborn to Sleep Through the Night


You’re exhausted, you have a new baby, and
you’re anxious to sleep through the night. My name is Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health
and Wellness Consultant, and I’m here to talk to you a little bit about babies and sleep.
The first thing you ought to know is that babies sleep a lot. You probably do know that
already you, just wish that they would sleep all night long. The thing about babies nervous
systems is that they tend to wake up every two, three, or four hours. Often they wake
up to be fed. A baby needs to get to be a certain age and a certain body weight in order
for them to be able to not need nutrition during the night. Sometimes that magic weight
might be somewhere around 12 pounds for example. By the time your child is about 3 to 6 months
old they ought to be sleeping 5 to 9 hours a night. In the mean time you can take some
steps to set it up so that your baby is likely to sleep for longer periods of time. Here’s
some things to do. One is during the day time; make sure that when the baby’s awake that
you provide some stimulation for them. That you talk to them a little bit, that you kind
of keep them a little more awake rather than just letting them sleep as much as they like.
The baby’s been sleeping for 2 or 3 hours during the day. You might kind of go in and
jostle a little bit and see if they aren’t perhaps ready to wake up. The second thing
to pay attention to is the night time routine. You want to signal to your baby that it’s
time to go to bed. What you do when they’re an infant carries over as they get to be several
months old; and you’ll be happy that you did this. You’re going to perhaps give them a
bath. You’re going to put them in some night time clothes. You’re going to give them a
bottle in a calm environment; maybe in their room while you’re rocking them or you’re breastfeeding.
Then you’re going to put them in bed. It’s best to put your baby to bed while they’re
still a little bit awake, you want your baby to get use to putting themselves to sleep.
Once they’re in their crib, then you say goodnight, and you leave the room. If they cry a little
bit don’t rush right back, you’re reinforcing that behavior. If they are crying a lot you’re
going to have to go back in and console them, pat them on the back, talk to them, maybe
start the mobile back up, and then quietly leave; stay calm. So what we are wanting to
do is to establish a good night time routine and also keep them awake a little bit more
during the daytime. Those are two strategies that you can try. Check with your pediatrician
they have a wealth of information at your next well child checkup. Again my name is
Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health and Wellness Consultant and good luck getting a good night
sleep.

“This Relief Came In Time” after Hurricane Dorian

“This Relief Came In Time” after Hurricane Dorian


Today we are here with Direct Relief. The
donations that came in for the persons down at our hospitals in Grand Bahama
and our connection in Abaco. This relief came in time and very very timely
because Direct Relief knows exactly what we needed and all of the medical and
surgical and pharmaceutical items are on point. They are going to bring relief to
the people of Grand Bahama and Abaco and so on behalf of the Bahamas government
as all of the people in the Bahamas, we say thank you very much for much needed supplies that will go a long way in bringing relief to our patients and
institutions.

Child Care & First Aid : Getting a Newborn to Sleep Through the Night


You’re exhausted, you have a new baby, and
you’re anxious to sleep through the night. My name is Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health
and Wellness Consultant, and I’m here to talk to you a little bit about babies and sleep.
The first thing you ought to know is that babies sleep a lot. You probably do know that
already you, just wish that they would sleep all night long. The thing about babies nervous
systems is that they tend to wake up every two, three, or four hours. Often they wake
up to be fed. A baby needs to get to be a certain age and a certain body weight in order
for them to be able to not need nutrition during the night. Sometimes that magic weight
might be somewhere around 12 pounds for example. By the time your child is about 3 to 6 months
old they ought to be sleeping 5 to 9 hours a night. In the mean time you can take some
steps to set it up so that your baby is likely to sleep for longer periods of time. Here’s
some things to do. One is during the day time; make sure that when the baby’s awake that
you provide some stimulation for them. That you talk to them a little bit, that you kind
of keep them a little more awake rather than just letting them sleep as much as they like.
The baby’s been sleeping for 2 or 3 hours during the day. You might kind of go in and
jostle a little bit and see if they aren’t perhaps ready to wake up. The second thing
to pay attention to is the night time routine. You want to signal to your baby that it’s
time to go to bed. What you do when they’re an infant carries over as they get to be several
months old; and you’ll be happy that you did this. You’re going to perhaps give them a
bath. You’re going to put them in some night time clothes. You’re going to give them a
bottle in a calm environment; maybe in their room while you’re rocking them or you’re breastfeeding.
Then you’re going to put them in bed. It’s best to put your baby to bed while they’re
still a little bit awake, you want your baby to get use to putting themselves to sleep.
Once they’re in their crib, then you say goodnight, and you leave the room. If they cry a little
bit don’t rush right back, you’re reinforcing that behavior. If they are crying a lot you’re
going to have to go back in and console them, pat them on the back, talk to them, maybe
start the mobile back up, and then quietly leave; stay calm. So what we are wanting to
do is to establish a good night time routine and also keep them awake a little bit more
during the daytime. Those are two strategies that you can try. Check with your pediatrician
they have a wealth of information at your next well child checkup. Again my name is
Beverly Bitterman, ARNP Health and Wellness Consultant and good luck getting a good night
sleep.

How to Better Treat Trauma Injuries in the Developing World

How to Better Treat Trauma Injuries in the Developing World


bjbj”9″9 RAY SUAREZ: Modern machinery has
caused a spike in injuries in the developing world. Now, a hospital in San Francisco aims
to train doctors to treat them. NewsHour correspondent Spencer Michels has our story. And a warning:
This story does contains some graphic images. SPENCER MICHELS: In recent years, the number
of motorized vehicles on the roads in developing countries has skyrocketed, and so have the
accidents. DR. RICK COUGHLIN, University of California, San Francisco: We know that the
global impact of injury in road traffic crashes is more than HIV, T.B., malaria combined.
Did you know that? No one knows that. And yet that’s the case. SPENCER MICHELS: Rick
Coughlin, an orthopedic surgeon at the University of California, San Francisco, is on a crusade
to improve the care of those who sustain traumatic injuries in the developing world. DR. RICK
COUGHLIN: Anyone who goes to a foreign country, a developing-world country, your fear isn’t
that you’re going to get HIV. Your fear is that you’re going to be in a car accident
and your leg is going to be exposed, and you’re — you’re in trouble now. SPENCER MICHELS:
For the last four years, Dr. Coughlin has been spearheading a unique program which brings
orthopedic surgeons from low-income countries around the world to San Francisco, to one
of the country’s leading trauma hospitals, San Francisco General. MAN: And everyone has
got covers. SPENCER MICHELS: Five surgeons from Kenya and Tanzania recently arrived for
a week of training and hands-on experience, learning the most up-to-date surgical techniques.
Dr. Nedford Ongaro is one of only 70 orthopedic surgeons in all of Kenya, a country of more
than 40 million people. He says lack of supplies contributes to dangerous delays in treating
traumatic injuries. DR. NEDFORD ONGARO, Nigeria: We do not talk like surgical implants or surgical
resources, so we give a prescription, someone has to go to buy hardware. That can take several
days. So this accessibility is quite limited. And really that increases the burden, perhaps
infections. People can lose limbs. And they don’t get back to work that quickly. So they
have quite morbidity. SPENCER MICHELS: While accurate numbers are hard to come by, the
World Health Organization estimates that for every person killed by traumatic injury, somewhere
between 10 to 50 times more suffer non-fatal injuries, which often require advanced medical
care. Without that care, the risk of amputation increases dramatically. DR. RICK COUGHLIN:
The global burden or global impact of amputation is quite enormous. There are enormous numbers
of what we call open injuries, where the bone, especially lower leg injuries, the lower leg
bones get exposed to the air, the dirt, become contaminated. And the soft tissue surrounding
those bones are injured. And now the bones are exposed. And in that capacity, if we can
teach the surgeons how to cover these exposed bones in an expeditious fashion, then we eliminate
the cycle of going down the path of infection, soft tissue infection, bone infection. And
then the only salvage is an amputation. MAN: The biggest issue with osteotomies is that
you have some bone missing because, if you use a saw, it takes a tiny bit of bone away.
SPENCER MICHELS: On the day we visited, the surgeons from Africa were practicing on the
elbow bone of a cadaver and the soft tissue around it. And they were learning how to drill
and insert sophisticated orthopedic pins in artificial bones. Dr. Edmund Eliezer from
Tanzania says the training he’s received, especially in techniques to prevent amputations,
has saved more than limbs. DR. EDMUND ELIEZER, Tanzania: Most of the times, these patients
are the ones who are taking care of the families. So with the two legs, life is difficult. Now
you can imagine, with the only remaining one leg, life would be very difficult. SPENCER
MICHELS: In much of Africa rural hospitals have few supplies. Heavy stones are sometimes
used as traction devices. But both Dr. Ongaro and Eliezer work in the capital cities in
their countries in fairly well-equipped hospitals. Still, they say, they are having a hard time
caring for the rising number of road traffic injuries. DR. RICK COUGHLIN: So this is a
mutual exchange. SPENCER MICHELS: And, for his part, Dr. Coughlin says one main goal
is to simply spread the message that traumatic injuries in the developing world are not getting
the attention they deserve. DR. RICK COUGHLIN: Why? Because HIV has the lobbying power and
infection disease people have the lobbying power. I have no doubt in my mind that we
are undersupplied, underfunded for research in this regard. SPENCER MICHELS: The Kenyan
and Tanzanian doctors say they will share the techniques and skills they have learned
during their week in San Francisco with colleagues back home. With just over 100 orthopedic surgeons
in their two countries, serving a total of 80 million people, this program is admittedly
a small step. But doctors here say they expect what they call a multiplier effect to spread
the training to other surgeons in the developing world. RAY SUAREZ: Last year, the United Nations
launched the Decade of Action for Road Safety, which aims to prevent the loss of more than
a million lives each year by 2020. gdvb :pvb urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags
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I Tried Medical Marijuana For My Chronic Pain

I Tried Medical Marijuana For My Chronic Pain


(heavy breathing)
(crying) – My name’s Kelsey and most of you know me as the loud mouth, no filtered, boss ass bitch producer
from Buzzfeed, which I am, but something that very
few people know about me is that I suffer from a
neuropathic, chronic pain condition know as Trigeminal Neuralgia, or TN. The Trigeminal nerve is a
nerve located within the brain. It’s primarily responsible
for transmitting sensation from the brain to the face. TN is a type of neuropathic pain. A type of pain that can occur when nerves are damaged or injured. In the medical field, Trigeminal Neuralgia is considered to be one of the worst pains known to mankind,
sending excruciating pain throughout the face, head, and jaw. The pain of TN is
comparable to severe burns, childbirth, and even the
bite of a bullet ant. (crying) – Don’t, don’t, I’m okay. – At one point, TN was
nicknamed the suicide disease because people who suffer
from this would take their own lives because of
the severity of the pain. Because of the pain, I’ve
had multiple surgeries to try and fix it, along
with expensive medications, therapies, treatments,
injections, acupunctures. I just had Botox injected
all across my forehead, into my scalp and jawline to
try and help with the pain. You can kind of see the bruising. I mean that costs $1,200
just to get this area done. You name it, I have tried it. Well, I have tried almost everything. (upbeat music) Recently, I’ve heard news
stories and read articles about marijuana helping chronic pain. I am at a point in my pain and in my life where I can’t take it
anywhere and I’m willing to try anything. I don’t smoke weed. Anymore. Something you should know about me, I smoked weed back in high school and then once I got older, I kind of started having really adverse reactions
to it, and just quit. Though I may not be a smoker anymore, I know that there’s hundreds
of strains of cannabis, so I needed to know exactly
what I was looking for. So I decided to a really
smart place at UCLA and talk to a really
fancy doctor about it. – There’s pretty strong evidence that whole leaf marijuana, or extracts of it, can be helpful for nerve pain. Chronic pain, but specifically nerve pain. Is the strongest evidence. – Wait a minute there, doc. Just how far back does this evidence go? There are records from 2900 BCE of Chinese Emperor Fu
Hsi stating marijuana possesses yin and yang. Around 1000 BCE in Ancient India, cannabis was combined with milk to drink as an anesthetic. The Ancient Greek doctor Galen would use cannabis to treat flatulence and pain. The Mexican Revolution
of 1910 brought many Mexican immigrants to
the US who introduced Americans to the recreational use of weed. The Great Depression
increased racial tension which caused the public
demand for government to crack down on marijuana use. Marijuana was then associated
with lower class communities. So basically for forever,
marijuana use wasn’t seen negatively until an influx of immigrants and racial tension caused
it to be criminalized, causing it to lose its
historical association with medicine. But, back to Dr. Strouse telling me something that blew my mind. – It’s not at all clear that THC alone has much pain-relieving affect. – Oh. Gonna be on the hunt, not for weed, but something called CBD oil, which is actually THC free. What is the difference
between CBD and THC? – The psychoactive part of marijuana, the part that gets you high, is THC. – Right. – CBD does not tend to make people feel high or intoxicated, that
there’s a balance there that a roughly one to
one mix sort of makes it easier for people to get a pain relief without that highness
that at least some people experience as unpleasant. – What? Why don’t these teach us this
kind of shit in high school? That there’s a weed out
there that I can smoke and not get high. Today I’m gonna go try
and get my weed card. I’m actually walking to a place that’s on the corner of my street, because in Los Angeles,
these places are everywhere. So you can’t just go
to your regular doctor to get a marijuana card,
you have to go to a doctor that specializes in medical
marijuana evaluations. So, got the paper, and the card. It took what, how long? – [Man] Like five seconds. – Like five seconds. So literally I sat in a
room and a nurse brought in a computer screen and
a guy on the other side was on Skype and I told
him what was wrong with me and he said, “Great, I’m gonna
give you a recommendation.” It was very sketchy but super easy. So I had my card and now I knew what I was kind of looking for, so now I just needed to go to a dispensary. Dispensaries just like a store for weed. (upbeat music) – My name is Allen, we’re
at WHTC in Studio City. You know, we’re not doctors, so, we really work with the patients to see what’s bothering them,
what their ailments are, and how we could help them. – So I notice you’re
using the word “patients.” – Yes. – [Kelsey] Explain what that means. – A lot of people say
customers, it’s that, no, we’re a medical marijuana dispensary. Everyone here is a patient. They went to a doctor, they have a– – Medical marijuana card, I just got one. – Medical marijuana
card, which is actually their prescription or their
doctor’s recommendation, saying that they can come in here and that they have an ailment that
requires medical marijuana. We see a wide variety of patients, dealing with all sorts of ailments. Anywhere from Crohn’s, diabetes, neuropathy, fibromyalgia, and chemo and cancer patients, absolutely. – Right. And people know about cancer. A lot people don’t know about, like, the anxiety that it can
with, or depression, or other “invisible illnesses.” – CBD’s very helpful because
it’s an anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, anti-arthritis. – So, what is the most popular
medicine you sell here? – Between flowers,
edibles, and concentrates– – Wait, flowers? – Flowers, as in medical marijuana. – [Kelsey] Okay, I was like, “What?” – So yeah, we refer to that as flower, then you have concentrate, which is also know an oil. Then we have topicals and
tinctures and edibles, so there’s top sellers
within every market. There’s just a wide variety. – Now it’s time to get to schmokin’. I just left the dispensary
and I’m actually feeling like, insanely optimistic. I’m in the parking lot at work, and I’m gonna just try
one of these things now ’cause I can’t wait to get home, so. I’m going to use this stick. – Another popular method,
especially for neuropathy, is topicals. – [Kelsey] Lotion. – [Allen] Lotion, exactly. – Oh. Oh wow, that’s very nice. Ah, god, that feels so good. It definitely smells
like kind of, Icy Hot. It has this weird cooling. So it’s been about two hours since I used the roll on stick. My muscles feel so relaxed. I still have a lot of the tightness where the nerve damage is. As far as the muscles in
my actual jaws and temple, oh my god, it’s like no
amount of physical therapy has given me relief for this long. – When people hear CBD, they
don’t know what CBD looks like, but if you’re looking
at it from a raw form. This would be our Mai Tai Cookies, and this has actually won first place at the High Time Cannabis
Cup for best CBD flower. – I was also really
nervous to try the flower. It tastes like pot. Because it reminded me of what I smoked in high school to get really high. When I used to smoke weed,
I just knew about two kinds: mids and dro. How much should I smoke? This is weird. I don’t know, I don’t trust this. Jesus fuck. Okay, so, I’ll let that settle in. But I was nervous for nothing. It turns out it was really great, and the thing I loved
most about the flowers was that it helped me the
most out of all the methods with my headaches so, anyone who suffers from chronic migraines, I would highly recommend this product. We see those things on Facebook, those videos where
someone’s having some sort of seizure or convulsion and they’re given some weed, whether
through a pen or a dose, and then five minutes later,
they’re totally normal. If we have proof like
that, why is the research still so, I don’t know,
underfunded, or shunned upon? – I’m gonna sound like a nerdy doctor and try to answer this question. – Please do, that’s why we’re here. – I apologize. But, you know, I’ve seen
some of those amazing video footage, for example,
the kids with these horrible epilepsy problems who go to Colorado, who
get Charlotte’s Web. – Right, we’ve all heard it. – That looks very compelling, and I think the fact that it’s so compelling and there’s so many
really moving testimonials by parents is why there
are now clinical trials being done with CBD by major university medical center neurology,
epilepsy specialists. – So we’re moving in the right direction? – [Dr. Strouse] We are, we are. – Okay, so it’s 6:30 on a Friday night, and while everyone else is going out and doing shit, I can
barely function as a human. The only thing that I can equate it to is like red hot fire ants
just biting your face and no matter what you
do, you can’t stop it. So, I’m going to try Black Medicated Rub. One CBD to THC, it doesn’t
really say how much to take, so I just took that. Oh my god, it smells so good. Let this settle in. It kind of looks like I just have a really poppin’ gloss on. – It’s a process. Start very small the first night, see how that affected you. Take note. Moving forward, you adjust. – So it’s been about 30 minutes
and I don’t feel anything, so we’re gonna take it up a notch. Gonna use this pen. What do you find to be the most popular? – The vape cartridge,
which is really quick. This is like almost instant relief. You vape it, and within a minute, you’re probably gonna feel the effects. – Delicious. Yo, I still cannot get over
the fact that I am a vape bro. It’s also considered to be
one of the healthiest ways to ingest cannabis,
’cause you’re not smoking any chemicals or papers. It was fast, it was easy,
it was by far the most convenient way to ingest the cannabis, but its effects didn’t last very long. So if you’re gonna try this method, I would suggest bringing it with you wherever you go, or getting a
higher concentrate in the pen. I’d read online that
people had a lot of success with tinctures, so I
bought a variety of kinds with various amounts of CBD and THC. Was pricey at $60, but hey,
willing to try anything. They were the most expensive
method that I tried, and none of them really worked for me. I don’t feel shit. About halfway through, I
think after repeatedly failing with the tinctures, I really
started to get depressed. (slow music) I just got done with one of
my doctor’s appointments. The appointment is $195 for a 20 minute appoinemtnt for someone to tell you
it’s trial and error and shit may or may not work. These specialist kinds of doctors aren’t covered by insurance and they have to get paid because the work that they’re doing is so underfunded. Of course they have to charge a bunch ’cause all of this shit
is so experimental. The idea that medical
marijuana is something that you can keep in your home, it’s at my disposal whenever I want it, I can take it whenever I want it. That would be like a fucking miracle, ’cause I am so sick of these
fucking doctor’s appointments. But then I think medical marijuana maybe that is the best option to even try first. I don’t know, it’s starting to
really fuckin’ fuck with me. Is the legalization of marijuana kind of undermining the
use of it as medicine, too? Like, are people afraid
that if medical marijuana becomes kind of the norm, will people stop going to see doctors, will people stop writing prescriptions, will the pharmaceutical world collapse? Is that a concern? – Though yes, my hunches may be there are people concerned about that, at another level people,
many people are worried about how responsible is big
marijuana gonna be, right? Big marijuana, like big tobacco, which until whatever year it was, 1982, was telling us that cigarettes
didn’t cause lung cancer. So it’s a huge business opportunity here and they’re going for it
and so, in whose interest will that business development be? Marijuana’s still illegal according to the Controlled Substances Act
of the federal government. It’s simply to work with the organizations that the federal government sustains, is really complicated and bureaucratic and that’s one of the reasons
why there’s so much anger. – Right, around it. – Around it. – ‘Cause then it becomes
like a government thing. We’re letting the government
control whether or not people can get better. While there is research being done, the US is so far behind
compared to other countries. There are still so many
states where this is illegal, and there is a stigma of that hippy stoner, vibe attached to this medicine. I could not imagine
living in a state where I needed this to function
and then potentially having to go to a job where they drug test and not being able to take my medicine. I want people to watch this video and rethink their relationship and their opinions on marijuana. To cheer myself up, I
decided to take an edible which I have heard so many horror stories where people have eaten
it, don’t feel anything, they eat more, and then
like two hours later, they’re melting into the wall. So I made my roommate
try it with me, and guys, this was the one time
that I got super high. And we also made some
brownies and just laughed and I got nothing done, I
couldn’t even blog about it. I just realized that that method is not practical for my lifestyle. Last minute I decided to add
one more thing to the test. This was a medication that
I had talked to Dr. Strouse about, it’s called Charlotte’s Web. So they can actually sell
it to any state in America because it’s considered hemp, and not cannabis. This one I’m really excited to try because this is the kind of strain that we see in those Facebook videos. They recommend that you use
this and kind of integrate it into part of your diet so
they’re saying it might not work the first time,
maybe it does for some people, but it’s something that
you should do daily. Mmm, it tastes like mint chocolate chip. Charlotte’s Web. Oh my god, Charlotte’s Web. I promise, despite the look of my hair, I’m doing much better today. I actually slept, like, some of the best sleep
I’ve slept in a long time, which, to have a pain free
sleep night is pretty rare. So I’m gonna start using this a lot more. It took a couple days of
tinkering with the amounts to figure out what was most
effective, but I highly recommend any chronic pain
patients to try this first. Even though it’s $150 a bottle, which lasted me about a month, it was worth every penny. When I started this
journey, I think the thing I was most afraid of was, would ingesting the
cannabis affect my energy or my ability to function
or my personality? When in reality, I was
able to sleep better, and my headaches were less frequent, which gave me more energy. I just so badly want
others to be able to have the chance to experience what I did. What’s it gonna take for that to happen? Is it like a big company
backing medicinal marijuana? What is it gonna take? Is it money? Is it more signatures? I don’t know, what? – Well I think for us to do, for example, this kind of research in
the VA, a federal entity, would probably require a repeal of the Federal Controlled Substances Act. – If you get anything from this video, know that it’s, chronic pain sufferers don’t just want your sympathy. They want your support and your action. I put some links below to organizations that are working all across the country to reform medical marijuana laws as well as some resources for
chronic pain sufferers. I want to give a huge shout
out and thanks to WHTC, UCLA, and the Facial
Pain Research Foundation. And if you’re a sufferer, I
just wanna say, don’t give up. Keep trying different methods. Talk to your doctor, make
them listen to your concerns. Tell them about cannabis,
talk to them about cannabis. I am happy to have found an
alternative to prescription pills or opiates because a lot of times that’s the first option chronic
pain sufferers are given. And for people like me,
whose condition doesn’t even react to opiates, this
has been an incredibly life changing experience. I’ve been so happy to
be educated about this and learn more about how my body reacts to medical marijuana so
that I’m not so nervous or afraid of it anymore. I’m gonna keep using the CBD roll-on stick and I use the Charlotte’s Web everyday, but I’m not gonna stop trying things. This is definitely not the solution. It’s not over. And just seeing the widespread acceptance of this plant as medicine, makes me feel incredibly excited and optimistic about chronic pain. For the first time ever. (upbeat music)

How astronauts handle medical meltdowns in space

How astronauts handle medical meltdowns in space


– We’re here in Boston at
Brigham and Women’s Hospital and we’re about to get a crash course in how to deal with a
medical emergency in space. I’m terrified! (techno music)
(coughing) (alarm blares) – The smoke seems to be going down so, (coughing)
and the alarm stopped so we should be– (background noise drowns out voices) NASA astronauts go into space when they’re at their
peak physical ability. But like the rest of us,
they can still get sick. And when that happens, it’s not as if they can just drive to the hospital. Astronauts in low Earth orbit like those on the International Space Station still have constant
contact with ground control if there’s a medical emergency. A flight surgeon can talk them through it and provide professional expertise. Astronauts flying to Mars
won’t have that luxury. They’ll need to solve
emergencies on their own without much help from Earth. And that’s why we’ve come
to the STRATUS Center. It specializes in medical simulations from doctoring robotic dummies to using virtual reality to
practice microscopic surgery. STRATUS received funding from NASA to build its own spacecraft sick bay, where they run medical
emergency simulations. While astronauts are currently trained in basic medical procedures,
this program is focused on how teams should behave
during a medical emergency on a deep space mission and what it will take to work autonomously without constant support
from ground control. So what I love about this center is that we’re in a regular
old hospital hallway and then we turn here and we’re in space. – Incredible, right? – I have to hand it to y’all, it looks like you ripped it straight
out of a sci-fi movie. – Thanks, well, we had a
lot of input from experts from NASA and it’s based
on the Destiny module so it’s the same kind of height and width so it feels compact. Just as in space. – Weight is such an issue for launching so how did you decide
what tools you would need, you know, what are some of the
basics that you have to have? – Heat load is a huge concern, and even things like fluids,
so we use a lot of IV fluid in the hospital and it’s
so heavy to take fluids, so you can’t really do that. And so we’ve got like a basic cardiac kit, a respiratory kit, like a first
aid kit that you would have with bandages and gauze and so on. It’s a low resource
healthcare environment. – [Loren Grush] So it’s
not a lot of equipment but it seems like you have
a lot of different things that could be used for different purposes. – This has all of the medicine you’d need, so this is like a medicine kit, it has some key drugs for
dealing with cardiac conditions such as epinephrine, it has
atropine, it has albuterol, other drugs and this is actually
what it really looks like. They’re in these little pouches so what would happen normally
is you’d open the door and things would start to
fly all over the place. – Right, gotta keep things down. – People come through
here and they expect us to have a switch so we can flick thew gravity
off and people will be floating so we don’t have that functionality. – [Loren Grush] So, I suit
up for the simulations. We’re gonna run through three of them. A common emergency, a
dire medical emergency, and a full out meltdown situation. The common medical situation we dealt with first, was cardiac arrhythmia, or an irregular heartbeat. – [Woman On Microphone]
How are her vital signs? – The pulse ox is 96 and
heart rate’s about 140. Blood pressure is 128/70.
– Okay, can you get an EKG? – So the stickers, it
tells you where to put ’em, so right, left, upper, and lower. – It’s nervous. – [Woman On Microphone]
I’m looking at the images from the monitor right now
and I think we’re gonna need to give her some medications. – It takes one, two, three, medicine’s in, so we got a pause on the monitor. And heart rate’s back, it’s
slower, I think we’re good, she’s looking much better. – Whoo, we did it, I think. (laughs) Next we faced a more
dire medical emergency. Ripley had a collapsed lung and I got to try out my shot-giving skills. – [Woman On Microphone]
You just go right in and you should hear a rush of air. – [Brett] Looks like the oxygen is maybe a little bit better. – You are really thinking
now of how does the crew deal with these events in a
semi-autonomous or autonomous way? If you have an acute
episode and it’s 20 minutes to wait for a response
from the flight surgeon on the ground, you don’t
have that functionality. – You need answers now.
– You got to do it. So the crew then has to work autonomously. – But we’re lucky in these simulations. We have communication with ground control to help us do these trainings. And good thing too, because our last test, we faced a critical emergency. Toxic exposure, plus a ship
malfunction on top of that. Hi, we have an alarm going off, it looks like we have a
leak, maybe an ammonia leak. An issue with the ship
causes a toxic ammonia leak. We need to put on our
personal protective equipment. – There’s no time. – We don’t have time for that. – [Woman On Microphone] Seems like your solar panels are overheating. – Oh crud, okay. On top of all this, one of our solar panels starts overheating, which we have to address for
the safety of the entire crew. – [Woman On Microphone]
Alright, we need to get that solar panel shut down
so it doesn’t overheat and cause more problems. – Okay. – Okay, I’m in the process
of getting that going. – [Female Crew Member] What
should we do about this? – Okay, hold on, can we put
the solar panel on pause? We need to talk about Ripley. – Wait, no, we can’t put that on pause. – Okay. What does Brett need to do to isolate the solar panel problem? – [Woman On Microphone] So he needs to go into Control Panel Three. – Okay, go to Control Panel Three. – [Woman On Microphone] Section J – Section J. Alright. (coughing) – Okay, that’s the sound that you’re over. (groaning) – We failed! These simulations help teams practice better communication and learn how to work together efficiently under stress. If you’re dealing with a new emergency, you don’t wanna be figuring out how to work together at the same time – In an extraterrestrial environment, simulating things before
they actually occur, figuring out the ergonomics of how do you take care of patients under very challenging circumstances
is a real opportunity to improve the care that we
provide potential patients in a space mission. – And you can’t really go to space all the time and practice. – Unfortunately, you can’t go to space all the time to practice, so doing this is at least the beginning of the work towards improving the quality of
care in space medicine. – No astronauts have gone
through these simulations yet, but STRATUS plans to do
more behavioral studies and improve their sick bay simulations and their methods could be incorporated into astronaut training someday. So, I think it’s clear that I have a lot more medical training I need to do before I’m equipped to deal with one of these emergencies in space. I think it’s clear that NASA does too. They’re gonna have to
do a lot of simulations like this one before they
send astronauts to Mars. NASA is still many years
away from sending crews into deep space, but when that time comes, simulations like these will be critical to training crews to work together so that they’ll be able to handle emergencies without much help from home. If you enjoyed this video
and want more space content with yours truly, you should
check out and subscribe to our new YouTube channel, Verge Science. Thanks for watching!