The Joy of Illness

The Joy of Illness


hi internet so I’ve got through about
10,000 tissues and forty dvds this week now i’m not going to porn marathon I’m
sick. I know what you’re thinking who gets a fucking cold in August well I do ok now I could have spent this time wallowing in self-pity and my own fluids but i thought no I’m going to take my anger and
discomfort and force people on the internet to listen to it everybody keeps
telling me to just enjoy having a cold and sit in bed and watch a bunch of
movies but people forget that that’s not how it works because when your body
isn’t busy trying to eject your lungs out of your face your brain is like and you just can’t concentrate on anything I tried to play halo and it didn’t work
right oh oh what’s the point in living and I’ve found that the older you get the
less you can tolerate just doing nothing when you’re in school it’s like well I
guess it could be doing algebra or being punched in the face by some dickhead right
now so this is pretty fun but as soon as you’ve left school it’s like how can I
just sit here and do nothing I should be doing taxes or answering
emails when you are responsible for your own life you can’t enjoy having a cold
because you’re just wasting what little time you have left before you inevitably
die and don’t expect any sympathy if your parents aren’t around my friends don’t even believe I have a cold so gross
oh you probably just have man flu you what
come here huh come here
why
let me sneeze on you
excuse me let me sneeze on your face
what
if I just have man flu and I sneeze on your face then tomorrow morning you won’t wake up in a coma Dan you’re scaring me
come here
Dan let go in my attempt to recover I bought many different kinds of medicine
and they don’t do FUCKING anything it’s all bullshit look it’s just the same thing in
different forms with different shitty flavors you know this you know what it
taste like it tastes like a FUCKING corpse and I don’t know what the corpse
tastes like before you all say that in the comments but I imagine it tastes like
this the people that made this I think they
invented the common cold so we have to keep constantly buying this crap if I
die after this is uploaded it wasn’t the illness it was the drug companies hit man the
one thing I know is how much I am going to appreciate life when I’m better you just
don’t think about it day to day it’s all oh my life is so hard nobody liked my
facebook status and then bam everything gets taken from you listen
here you little shit unless you have a terminal illness or
something you better be appreciating your life right now you are healthy you’re free you can do anything you want
to go climb a goddamn moutain just because you can because i’m telling
you now this has changed my perspective as soon
as I have won this battle I know exactly how I’m going to spend my
life it’s the sick bed ridden screen yeah if
you enjoyed this and you want to see more from me then you can click on this tissue box to
subscribe to my channel to be told when I make a new video and
if you know any secrets or you always do something to help you recover from a
cold and please let me know what that is down in the comments I mean none of them are going to work because if they did then I think everyone would know about
it by now but I want to anyway I need the hope so for now I’m going to
stay exactly where I’m sat and there will be a new video next friday bye guys

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : General Allergic Reactions

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : General Allergic Reactions


Allergic reaction is nothing more than your
bodies? response to a foreign substance, this called an allergen. Allergic reaction can
be caused by any number of things. Basically, anything can cause an allergic reaction. Some
examples that I have on screen here are the four different ways that you can be exposed
to allergic reaction. One of them over here is skin contact through a plant, through animal,
through pollen or through latex are all ways the common allergic reactions happen. Another
way is through injection either through a needle at a hospital setting or through a
bee sting or any type of insect bite can also trigger an allergic reaction. If you ingest
something such as food, medication, nuts and shells are very common. Several people have
shell allergies and also to peanuts. Another one is through inhalation through pollen,
dust, mold mildew and animals. I am sure everybody has someone that they know that has an allergic
reaction of some sort and this is just overview of some of the things that can cause it.

How to PACK a WOUND | Bitesize First Aid

How to PACK a WOUND | Bitesize First Aid


– Catastrophic bleeding
and how to pack a wound. So many of us have heard of tourniquets and how you can stop bleeding on limbs by actually occluding or
blocking the blood supply below the wound. Or what if it’s more of a blast and you
can’t get to the source of the bleeding? Maybe it’s on the side of you and it’s not suitable for a tourniquet. So another way to stop
bleeding in this sort of wound is to actually pack the wound. Now what you are doing
when you’re doing this is, please wear gloves, so with your gloved hand, you are putting your finger
into the source of the bleeding. So you’re actually stopping
where the blood is coming out. You are then getting something to pack that wound. Now the military and the
NHS use things like Cellux or trauma gauze, which has a clotting agent on it. And that will increase the clotting and allow the wound to clot far quicker than you packing a wound. However, packing a wound
with an improvised dressing is still incredibly powerful. You can save somebody’s life with a sock. How about that? And what you would do is find
the source of the bleeding with your finger, so a gloved finger, gloved hand, and you get something like this, so this is just a triangular
bandage or it could be a sock or it could be a bit of
cotton shirt or whatever, and what you are doing is
literally putting that in and then bit by bit, you are lifting up and pushing down on top of this packing so that you are packing that wound in all the different areas, so that as you are packing it, which you would do relatively quickly, you are then filling the
wound with this material so that when you are now pushing down, you are applying pressure
directly to the source of the wound, because you have filled it. So you would put it in like this. You would apply pressure on top, ideally with a dressing or, if you have access to one of
these great blast dressing type of things, you can do a really good
compression over the top where you will put this
in and you can use this with this natty, little gadget to get it on as tight as you possibly can. ‘Cause you will need the pressure to stop the bleeding coming through. So you would put this on, you twist it, this one, as you go round, but you would put this on tightly and you would get emergency
help as quickly as possible. Look for signs of shock. If they’ve got a catastrophic bleed, they will be showing signs of shock. Keep them warm, keep them dry. Elevate the legs if at all possible. And this is an emergency, get help fast. (gentle music)

Jefferson fracture – radiology video tutorial (x-ray, CT)

Jefferson fracture – radiology video tutorial (x-ray, CT)


Hi I’m doctor andrew dixon from radiopaedia.org and in this video we’re going to take a look at the Jefferson fracture which
is a burst type fracture of C1 due to excessive axial loading with
fractures occuring through both the anterior and posterior arches so here is a case from our iPad app of a
twenty-year-old male involved in a motorcycle accident. Here’s his lateral
cervical spine radiograph and we’ll just zoom in to show you some of the abnormalities. You can
see here that the altantodens interval is significantly widened. This should
normally be less than 3mm and you can see out the back this lucent line through the posterior arch representing a fracture. On the PEG view we see that both at the lateral masses of C1 are displaced laterally
relative to the lateral masses of C2 you can see with my laser
pointer that C1 is overhanging C2. This should normally be a straight line like
this, however we can see that both sides have displaced laterally. Now the only way that can happen is if
the arch of C1 is broken in two spots. And we can see here on the CT that is in
fact the case. you can clearly see a fracture through
the posterior arch and a fracture line here through the anterior arch. now the other important thing to note
is this bone fragment here which represents an avulsed fragment from
the insertion of the transverse ligament. this is a rare but important finding in
the setting of Jefferson fracture as it implies instability and explains
why this patient had a widened altantodens distance of the lateral view. so unlike the vast majority of Jefferson’s fractures which can be managed conservatively with immobilization, this
patient may in fact require more definitive surgical management. so there you have it, the Jefferson’s fracture
of C1. you can find out more on our radiopaedia website where there are several other case examples. and this case is featured in our radiopaedia iPad aap which can be found in the App Store.

Healing illness with the subconscious mind | Danna Pycher | TEDxPineCrestSchool


Translator: Queenie Lee
Reviewer: Peter van de Ven What if I told you, you might not be
who you think you are? What if I told you that your
very perception or idea of who you are has been weaved into your mind over time? What if you don’t agree
with what your mind has to tell you? I’ve always had an inquiring mind.
I’ve always questioned everything. I felt the need to get
to the bottom of everything and never took anything at face value. This ever curious personality
would one day save my life. Let me tell you who I am.
Hi, I’m Danna. I’m a hypnotherapist, specializing
in trauma and chronic illness. I also do a lot of public speaking
about the Holocaust because I’m a third generation descendant, about trauma, and my favorite topic to speak about,
the subconscious mind and how it works, because, holy moly, it’s fascinating. I want to take you
on a little journey, today, that will expose the connection
between your mind, who you think you are,
and the potential onset of disease. So if you may, please follow along
as we go through the human experience. From conception until death. OK, so it won’t be that morbid. We, all of us, are born as blank slates. We, all of us,
then, through our experiences, are programmed to have certain beliefs about who we are, what we can achieve in life,
and what type of person we should be. From birth until six, we are essentially living life
in a hypnotic trance. It’s why we learn languages
so quickly at this young age. We are sponges just joyously absorbing
everything around us. At this precious age,
we’ve set up the rest of our lives, that’s right. What we learned from
about the age of zero until six is essentially the patterns or programming
we begin to develop from then and repeat again and again
from adolescence into adulthood. I want to tell you something
that might offend you: people, we are patterns. I also want to relate
something else to you: sometimes our patterns do not serve us. Those patterns are called disease,
depression, obesity, and the list, unfortunately,
goes on and on. OK, let’s rewind for a minute. I want to rewind to a really
serious pattern that I had in the past. I had what’s called
chronic fatigue syndrome, which later turned into fibromyalgia. Both are chronic illnesses
that, to put them lightly, are no fun, and to put them into context
can be seriously debilitating. I was 18 years old, and I would suddenly go
in and out of these intense spurts of not being able to function. I was dead tired to a point where if I couldn’t take a nap
in the moment I needed to, I felt as if my heart would give out. The fact that I was so young,
I knew something was wrong. I went to many doctors, many doctors, who all told me
I was either stressed or depressed. And I looked at them, and I said,
“I’m a freshman in college. Really, what do I have
to be depressed about?” So for years, I did research
into why I felt the way I felt, and I became my own advocate. I began experimenting with diet,
with lifestyle, many different things, just to try to get a handle
on my symptoms. And I started to feel better, and I was able to really
get a handle on my life and to manage life really well. And when I finally
had a big handle on my health, I got severely knocked down again. And when I say knocked down, I mean almost killed
in a near-fatal car accident. T-boned, smashed, left hanging upside down in my car
until the firefighters came to cut me out, not sure if I was paralyzed or dead. Without going into the gory details, I knew that I was in
for a long ride ahead of me. I was handicapped for six months, and I developed what’s called PTSD,
or post-traumatic stress disorder. And on top of that,
I began to feel sick again. In 30 seconds, I wasn’t the same Danna anymore. I developed PTSD, and because I knew that I was one person
and I wasn’t that person anymore, I knew I had to see someone
or do something about it. So I began to see this therapist,
and she was a very nice woman. She would tell me things when you
get to a stop sign, you need to breathe. So I thought to myself, am I really paying you
this much money for that? That I got. So eventually after six months
of minimal improvement, I met a woman who survived cancer, and she said she would not
have survived cancer were it not for this
trauma therapist she went to. So I said, “That’s my woman.” So I went, and the first appointment
with her, this trauma therapist, she looked at me, and she said, “I’m a bit alternative.
I hope that’s okay with you.” And I said, “I’m desperate,
whatever you got.” She said, “I do this thing
called hypnosis.” I said, “There is no way
you’re touching my brain with that stuff.” I was super skeptical, I had no idea what it was, and my only reference was show hypnosis, and hypnotherapy is not show hypnosis. So basically, after about six
or seven sessions of meeting with her, I decided that I liked her. She was smart, forward-thinking,
compassionate, so I thought to myself, “What the heck! What can it hurt?” So I walked into that session, I walked in feeling one way,
I walked out feeling another. I wasn’t exactly sure what she did. I just felt better. Within six weeks, my PTSD was gone. The next month my depression,
the next month my anxiety. This woman saved my life. OK, so that’s all interesting, and I want to tell you something
even more interesting. So I mentioned to you earlier
that I started with chronic fatigue and later developed
what’s called fibromyalgia. I view these two ailments
as sisters, very similar. Yet fibromyalgia
on top of the intense fatigue is a serious muscular pain. Yet what’s the interesting part is, I didn’t develop this pain
until after my accident. So here’s the interesting part. When I was healing my trauma
through hypnosis, the pain in my legs began to dissipate. Bit by bit, little by little, the pain in my body was leaving. I thought to myself,
“Wow, what’s happening here?” So that brings us
to where we’re going today. I want to walk you through the mechanics
of the hypnotic process and how it works, and how the mind and body
and disease and thought are all interconnected. But first, let’s jump into the science
of how minds and bodies interact. So, how exactly are trauma
and disease correlated? I want to mention to you that trauma doesn’t have to be
a near-fatal car accident; it doesn’t have to be
coming back from war. In my mind, the way I view trauma is if you viewed the world one way
and then some situation happened to you and now you view the world
in a different way, that can be a traumatic circumstance. So it doesn’t have to be
this overwhelming experience. Have you ever heard
the phrase “stress kills”? OK. So, I used to hear that phrase
and I used to scoff. Yet now, I see just how valid
that statement is. Physical and psychological stressors
cause inflammation to occur in the body. Inflammation is the keyword
in many diseases. Reducing inflammation
is the key to healing many diseases. Are you with me this far?
OK, beautiful. When events happen in life,
they’re recorded; when stressful events happen,
they are recorded as is. And that creates a certain level
of shock on the mind, which therefore sends distress signals
down the nervous system, which in turn will tell
the endocrine system to increase adrenaline and cortisol, and while those levels are increased,
our immune levels are lowered. The fact that we have
these stress responses initially is not a bad thing, yet the fact that our minds
compound all of these situations over time without ever letting them go. Every situation builds upon each other. So the real reason
we experience stress in reality is for our own good,
for our own safety. If you think of an animal,
for example, a mouse. A mouse sees a cat, gets anxiety,
has stress levels. Why? Because it needs to make
the decision to run away. Yet once the mouse runs away,
once the mouse finds cover, that anxiety is gone. The mouse doesn’t over-analyze
what the cat was thinking, how to feel about it now,
and what to do about it. No, that’s only something humans do. Humans encounter a stressful situation, we instantaneously attach meaning to it,
and then it’s recorded forever. So the initial stress isn’t bad, the continual attachment
to the stress is bad. Follow me so far? Good, OK. So just to reiterate, when we experience stress there’s a recording
in the subconscious mind. And enough of those recordings, over time, will cause havoc and
an overstressed nervous system, which in turn will cause
an overproduction of stress hormones and a suppression of immune function. So, now the golden question:
How do we reverse all of this? So there’s a new study
dedicated to all of this called psychoneuroimmunology. Psychoneuroimmunology, meaning the branch of medicine that deals with the influence
of emotional states and nervous system activity
on immune function, especially in relation to disease. So that’s the textbook definition. In reality, the best way that I have found to take the study off of paper
and into real life, to intervene in the influence
of stress on immunity, I have found is hypnotherapy. How? Let me tell you. So I do this fascinating therapy,
it’s called regression therapy. Essentially what this means is I take my clients to the first time,
the very first, first, first initial time, that a stressful event or events
caused the ailment at hand. For example, let’s say
we’re working with depression. I’ll guide a client
through a visualization, through their subconscious mind, it’s very cool, and then through this visualization, I’ll say something like this:
“We’re going to go to the first time, the very first time you
had emotions around depression.” And so what happens
in the subconscious mind is the subconscious mind then links up
with these specific memories that are tied to that specific ailment. So it goes something like this: A client would describe something that happened
when they were two years old. “I was two, my parents were fighting, I felt very upset, confused,
responsible for my parents, etc.” So then I start asking them
questions like this: “In that moment, how did you
need to feel as a two-year-old?” And then they would respond
something to the effect of: “I needed to feel like a baby,
like a two-year-old, comforted, etc.” So at this point, I would then direct them to feel
as if in that memory, they were filling their body
as the two-year-old with the resources that he or she
needed in that moment. In that moment, there is healing. You cannot change what has happened
to you in the past. Instead, you’re changing
the mind’s perception and the weight of the heavy feelings
that the past memory holds. Then after resolving that memory, we would then proceed through other
memories in a similar fashion. So what exactly is this doing? It is completely allowing
the subconscious mind to cope with things
it never got to cope with in the past. This reduces the recorded stress
that we’ve carried around our whole lives. When the subconscious mind heals,
it allows the nervous system to relax. When the nervous system relaxes,
there are less erratic signals. When there are less erratic signals, the endocrine system does not need to be
in a chronic state of fight or flight, therefore sending out inflammatory
hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. You see all this is all coming together? OK, I know I overloaded you
with a ton of information. So I want to finish up with this. A bit of an experience I had
with a client who came to see me. There’s a woman, she came to see me,
and she came to see me for weight loss, which many people do, many people come
to see hypnotists to lose weight. And I asked her: “What’s the issue? No motivation to get to the gym,
you don’t have a taste for healthy food; what’s going on?” So she said, “No,
I have motivation get to the gym. Yet every time I go,
I get into more pain.” So I asked, “Why are you in pain?” I said, “Oh, am I familiar?” So I said to her,
“Let’s start from the inside out. Instead of working on your
motivation to get to the gym, we should work on your
fibromyalgia pain first.” I asked her: “Where do you feel
most of it right now?” She said in her neck. I said, okay, let’s go for it. We did a regression session
around the pain in her neck. And the memory that came up
was at the time she was 12 years old, her and her brother got into a fight. He pushed her down the stairs and she essentially
got a stiff neck for a few weeks, and then it went away. Ten years later, it came back, and she told me that for 20 years
she couldn’t move her neck. We resolved that trauma – the trauma surrounding
that memory and a few others. When we finished,
she came up out of hypnosis, and she went like this. For the first time in 20 years,
she moved her neck. My mouth dropped and so did hers. We carry our lives with us
not only in our minds yet all over our body. Our bodies and minds
are intrinsically connected. There’s so much more detail
I can go through on this topic, yet really, this is the takeaway
I want to give to you today: The mind and body are resilient and have the innate ability
to heal themselves. Yet sometimes they just
need a bit of guidance. My wish for you is to be informed and to know that there are
resources out there to help you feel like the best you. I was told, time and time again,
that I would be sick or have PTSD forever. I was told by many doctors that I’d have to be
on high-level antidepressants, that there was no hope for me – this was the pathway of my life. Yet, in reality, I knew, and I was determined
with every ounce of my being to get back to who I knew I was: that girl that existed
somewhere deep down inside me. And now, I speak about chronic illness
and PTSD in the past, behind me, no longer part of me. If there’s someone you know
who doesn’t feel good, please tell them that there is hope. If you can heal your mind,
you can heal your life. So here’s to you,
your healthy mind and body, and here’s to never give up
the fight for your vitality. Thank you very much. (Applause)

How to make diseases disappear | Rangan Chatterjee | TEDxLiverpool

How to make diseases disappear | Rangan Chatterjee | TEDxLiverpool


Translator: Queenie Lee
Reviewer: Rhonda Jacobs I can make diseases disappear. To be more precise, I can make chronic diseases disappear. You see, chronic diseases
are the long-term conditions, like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, depression or even dementia. There are 15 million people in England who have already been diagnosed
with a chronic condition. So that means looking out amongst you now, there are probably
about 250 people in here who have one of these
long-term conditions. Just one of these alone, type 2 diabetes, is costing the UK
20 billion pounds every single year, and I’m standing here before you saying I can make these diseases disappear. See, I’m not a magician, I’m what the Americans call an MD. That’s not a magical doctor, that’s a medical doctor
or what I call a mere doctor. You see, the reason
I can make diseases disappear is because diseases are just an illusion; diseases are not real. In fact, diseases don’t really exist, at least not in the way
that we think they do. So 15 years ago, I qualified for medical school,
and I was ready, I was full of enthusiasm,
full of passion, ready to go out and help people. But I always felt like
there was something missing. I started off as a specialist. I moved from being a specialist
to becoming a generalist, or a GP. And I always got this nagging sense that I was just managing disease
or simply suppressing people’s symptoms. And then, just five and a half years ago,
came the turning point for me. See, five and a half years ago,
my son nearly died. My wife and I,
we were on holiday in France with our little baby boy, and she called out to me,
said ‘He’s not moving’, so I rushed there, and he was lifeless. I thought he was choking, so I picked him up,
I tried to clear his airway. Nothing happened, and I froze. She called out to me and said, ‘Come on, we’ve got to get to hospital’. So we rushed there; we were worried because when we got there,
he still wasn’t moving. The doctors were worried because they didn’t know
what was happening. That night he had two lumbar punctures because they thought
he might have meningitis, and he stayed in
a foreign hospital for three days. What actually transpired was my son had a low level
of calcium in his blood that was caused
by a low level of vitamin D. My son nearly died
from a preventable vitamin deficiency and his father, a doctor,
knew nothing about it. You see, as a parent that is a harrowing experience
that never leaves you. But I was a doctor, I was his dad; and the guilt that stayed with me,
and is still here today, that changes you. So I started reading, I started reading
about this vitamin deficiency. And as I started reading I started to learn a lot of science – a lot of science that I did not learn
in medical school, a lot of science that I thought: ‘Hey, this makes lots of sense to me’. So I started applying this science. I started applying it,
first of all, with my son, and I saw the amazing benefits. So then I started applying it
with my patients, and do you know what happened? People started getting better, really better. You see, I learnt how to resolve
the root cause of their problems rather than simply
suppressing their symptoms. Just over a year ago, I had the opportunity to make
a series of documentaries for BBC One where I got to showcase
this style of medicine. I’m going to tell you
about one of the patients – a 35-year-old, Dotti, lovely, lovely lady, but she was struggling with her health, weight problems,
joint problems, sleep problems. See, despite Dotti’s best efforts, Dotti was unable to make
any sustainable changes. So I went into Dotti’s house, and in the first week
I did some blood tests, and I diagnosed her with type 2 diabetes. Six weeks later when I left Dotti’s house, she no longer had type 2 diabetes. You see, her disease had disappeared. So health exists on a continuum. Okay? At the top right we’ve got disease, and at the bottom left
we’ve got optimal health, and we are always moving
up and down that continuum. Take Christmas, New Year,
for example, right? We drink too much,
we eat too much, we stay up late; we probably start to move up that curve. But if we recalibrate
in January and February, we start to move back down it again. We get involved in medicine and give you a diagnosis
of a chronic disease … here, but things have been starting
to go wrong … back here. See, when I met Dotti,
she was up here, she had a disease. You see, you can think of it
a little bit like a fire that’s been burning
in Dotti’s body for years; it’s getting bigger till it’s finally raging out of control. At that point, I can say,
‘Hey Dotti, you have a disease’. And I told her that,
‘You do have a disease.’ But what caused it in the first place? The thing we have to understand is that acute disease and chronic disease
are two different things. Acute disease is something
we’re pretty good at as doctors, we’re good at this. It’s quite simple. Okay? You have something like a pneumonia, that’s a severe lung infection. So in your lung you have
the overgrowth of some bugs, typically a bacteria. We identify the bacteria,
we give you a treatment, typically an antibiotic,
and it kills the bacteria. The bacteria dies and hey, presto,
you no longer have your pneumonia. The problem is we apply
that same thinking to chronic disease and it simply doesn’t work, because chronic disease
doesn’t just happen. You don’t just wake up
with chronic disease one day and there are many different causes
of chronic disease. By the time we give you that diagnosis, things have been going wrong
for a long, long time. So when I met Dotti
and she had her ‘diagnosis’, her blood sugar was out of control, because that’s what people say, many people say that type 2 diabetes
is a blood sugar problem, but they’re missing the point. There is a problem
with blood sugar in type 2 diabetes, but type 2 diabetes
is not a blood sugar problem. The blood sugar is the symptom,
it’s not the cause! If we only treat symptoms
we’ll never get rid of the disease. So when I met Dotti, I said, ‘Dotti, you’ve got a problem
with your blood sugar. Dotti, for the last few years your body has become
more and more intolerant to certain foods. At the moment, Dotti, your body does not tolerate refined or processed carbs
or sugar at all. So you’ve got to cut them out’. So what does that do? Well, it stops putting fuel
on Dotti’s raging fire. But then we’ve got to work out
what started the fire in the first place? And what was the fuel
that caused it to burn for so long? In most cases of type 2 diabetes, this is something
called insulin resistance. Now insulin is a very important hormone, and one of its key functions is to keep your blood sugar
tightly controlled in your body. So, let’s say you’re at the bottom left
in optimal health, like all of us in here, and you have a breakfast
of say, a sugary bowl of cereal. What happens is your blood sugar goes up, but your body releases
a little bit of insulin, and it comes back down to normal. As you move up that curve, you are becoming more
and more insulin resistant; that means you need
more and more insulin to do the same job. And for all those years
before you get anywhere near a diagnosis, that raised level of insulin
is causing you a lot of problems. You could think of it
a little bit like alcohol. The very first time you have a drink, what happens? Say, you have a glass of wine,
one or two sips, maybe half a glass; you feel tipsy; you feel a little bit drunk. And as you become a more seasoned
and accustomed drinker, you need more and more alcohol
to have the same effect; so that’s what’s going on with insulin. You need more and more insulin
to have the same effect, but that insulin itself is problematic. And when the insulin can no longer
keep your sugar under control, at that point we say,
‘Oh, you’ve got a disease’; at that point, you have type 2 diabetes. So what causes this insulin resistance that then causes type 2 diabetes? Well, there are many different things. It could be your diet. It could be that your diet
for the last ten years has been full of processed junk food. That could be a cause. Or there’s something else. What if it’s the fact that you
are chronically stressed? Work stress, emotional stress, perceived stress. For me, just seeing
my email inbox sometimes, that’s a stress. See, that raises
levels of cortisol in your body, and cortisol, when it’s up,
raises your sugar which causes insulin resistance. What if it’s something else? What if it’s the fact
you have been sleep deprived because you are a shift worker? See, in some people,
one night’s sleep deprivation can give you as much insulin resistance
as six months on a junk food diet. What if it’s the fact that as you’re
getting older, you’re losing muscle mass? That causes insulin resistance. Or what if it’s something to do with
something we call your microbiome? See, inside our body,
we have trillions of bugs living there, and the balance of those bugs
is critical for our overall health. If you have a disruption to that balance, you can get the overgrowth
of certain bacteria, and on their jacket, these bacteria have something
called lipopolysaccharide, or LPS. And what that does
is when it gets in your blood, it causes insulin resistance. You see, the problem is there are many different causes
of insulin resistance, and if we don’t address the causes
for that particular patient, we will never get rid of the disease. That’s what I did with Dotti, and that’s why six weeks after I met her, she no longer had a disease. What about something else
completely unrelated? What about depression? You see, one in five people are going to get depression
at some point in their lives. So what is depression? There’s no blood test for depression; there’s no scan for depression. Depression is simply the name
that we give to a collection of symptoms. But what causes the depression? Well, we know that
many cases of depression are associated with something
called inflammation. Now this isn’t the same inflammation
as if you trip up, you sprain your ankle, it gets red, it gets swollen,
it gets hot for a few days. But this is entirely different.
This is chronic inflammation. This happens when your body thinks
it is under constant attack. Now, King’s College London three weeks ago
published a study on this. This is current up-to-date stuff. Patients with depression, if they had high levels
of inflammation in their body, they did not respond
to antidepressants. Take a step back,
it sort of makes sense, doesn’t it? Because an antidepressant is designed to raise the level
of a chemical in your brain. But what if the cause of your depression is actually coming from your body
and the inflammation that’s in your body? Surely, it makes more sense
to address that. See, what causes this inflammation? Well, your diet plays a part in that, your stress levels play a part. Chronic sleep deprivation. Physical inactivity. A lack of exposure to the sun
which gives you vitamin D. Disruptions in the gut microbiome. There are many different things. If we do not address the cause,
we’ll never get rid of diseases. Diseases are the symptom. What about something else? What about Alzheimer’s disease? See? We’re all living longer, aren’t we? But we’re scared. We’re scared that as we live longer
and as we live older we may have to live with the devastating
consequences of things like Alzheimer’s. I’m sure many of us in here
have experienced that ourselves, with our family. It’s a heart-wrenching condition, and we, the doctors,
we’re scrambling around, and we’re trying to find the cure. There’s a professor in San Francisco,
Professor Bredesen, who was actually demonstrating
that you can cure dementia. He’s shown that you can
reverse cognitive decline in his patients with dementia; and how is he doing that? Well, one thing he’s not doing
is he is not saying, ‘Well, all these patients
in my office have got dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, what is the cure?’ No, he’s going the other way; he’s saying, with all these patients,
let’s say ten patients in my office, he’s trying to work out what have been the triggers
for the last 20 years that have ended up with this patient
expressing themselves as dementia? And he identifies them, and he corrects every single one of them. And when he does that,
guess what’s happening? They are reversing their symptoms, they are no longer being classified
as having dementia. It’s a brand new way
of looking at disease. It’s looking at what is causing
this disease in this individual patient. It’s totally different. So what factors is he looking at? Well, he’s looking at their diet; he’s looking at their stress levels, their sleep quality, their physical activity levels, their exposure
to environmental toxins, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Is this starting to sound
a little bit familiar? See, what if all these seemingly
separate diseases actually at their core
share common root causes? See, we need to update our thinking: Our genetics are not our destiny. Our genes load the gun, but it’s our environment
that pulls the trigger. All these factors here, these are the factors
that basically interact with your genes and determine how your genes
are expressed, whether you are in optimal health,
whether you have a disease, or whether you are somewhere in between. Collectively, as a society, I genuinely believe
we can do better and we have to do better. Type 2 diabetes alone
is costing us 20 billion pounds a year. Just a 1% saving there
would be 200 million pounds. I think we can do way better than 1%. In the United States today, the new generation of kids that are born
have a lower life expectancy than the generation before them. Is this evolution or is this devolution? You see, we need to evolve
the way that we practice medicine. We need the medicine of aetiology,
not symptomatology – the medicine that asks why,
not only tells you what. This is personalized medicine,
this is precision medicine, this is progressive medicine. And actually, if you take a step back, this is preventative medicine
in its purest form. We have got to stop applying 20th century thinking
to 21st century problems. We need to take back control,
empower ourselves, and re-educate ourselves
away from our fear of disease and right back down the curve
to optimal health. Because if we do, together, I genuinely believe that we can
change not only our health, not only the health of our communities, but maybe, just maybe we could start to change the health
of the entire world. Thank you. (Cheers) (Applause)

The Hell of Chronic Illness | Sita Gaia | TEDxStanleyPark

The Hell of Chronic Illness | Sita Gaia | TEDxStanleyPark


Translator: Katie Poole
Reviewer: Peter van de Ven Did you know that one in three individuals suffers from at least
one chronic health issue? If that’s not you, then it’s either the person
in the seat to your left or your right. A chronic illness is an illness that persists
for longer than three months, and there is no cure
through vaccinations or medications. You know plenty
of medical chronic illnesses: diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, fibromyalgia, epilepsy. It goes on and on and on. I am an epileptic. Uncontrollable, intractable seizures. I might stiffen up and fall to the ground
(Snaps fingers) like that. Or I might daydream and stare really hard, and if you’re in my line of focus, you might think
I’m giving you a good look. (Chuckling) That’s not the case. (Chuckles) I might also do some weird,
repetitive activities such as picking things up
and putting them into a bag. It makes no sense, but that’s the seizure. I want you to sit here and take it in, feel it, and in the end, act
in a useful and helpful way. I have fallen multiple times
on concrete and cement, which have resulted in concussions. I have also burned
the entire top half of my torso with hot tea. This resulted in four months
of bandage-changing and on morphine. Two years later,
and my burn is still healing. Finally, I needed a root canal and a cap because I fell face-forward on brick. I’m not going to tell you
which tooth it is, though. (Chuckling) I’m not the only one
who’s in physical jeopardy. I was hanging out
with my friend Jordan one time, and he’s a type 1 diabetic. Thanks to my mom, she recognized that his blood sugars
were painfully low. We called a paramedic, and if we hadn’t, he was this close from slipping
into a diabetic coma. I also have two friends
who’ve been hit by cars in the last year. One of them has a visual impairment, and the other one uses a scooter
because of an acquired brain injury. If I have a large amount of seizures
in a short period of time, I lose a lot of short-term memory. This sucks, (Chuckling) especially if I’m trying to
achieve something, and it can also be embarrassing if I’m trying to have a
conversation with someone. I don’t know where I started
and they ended. Seniors moment much?
I think I’m starting early. I also feel so fatigued. I might need to sleep
for three to four days. This fatigue is on top of
the medication that I take. You know, you’ve seen
the ads for medication. The side effects are like this long. It’s insane! With chronic illness,
depending on your chronic illness, you might have to say goodbye
to a lot of things. You have heart disease? Kiss goodbye hiking in the mountains
with your friends. With chronic illness,
it is a world of loss. Now that I have painted
a picture for you of what it’s like to experience
chronic illness on a physical level, let me paint for you a picture
of what it’s like to live with mental health issues
and emotional issues. I have been plagued by anxiety, and I did not leave my house
for an entire week. That’s a long time. I have also fallen into a pit
of despair and depression, not knowing where I was going to go
or where I was going to end up, and I felt like a total failure. I’ve seen this among my other friends
with chronic illness too. So if you see someone
who is isolating themselves, I tell you, reach out a hand, talk to them. Talking to them shows them that you care. Help in whichever way you can. On top of all of this,
the icing on the cake, is how people treat you
based on your chronic illness. For my age, the challenges
of dating loom large. I’m often very up-front about my epilepsy when I’m meeting someone
for the first time. They’re generally pretty cool about it. “You’ve got epilepsy? No problem.” “Seizures? Seen them in the movies.” But, sometimes people can be unkind. I was on a date one time,
and it seemed to be going pretty well. We were in a restaurant
making casual conversation, and we decided to walk down by the water. We weren’t really talking
about anything in particular, and we got to a crosswalk. We got to the crosswalk,
and as we were crossing, boom! I had a seizure and fell flat on my face. Now, I had taught this person
about the appropriate seizure first aid. The first thing I told him – be calm. So when I came out of the seizure
two minutes later, I pulled myself up, back on my feet. “I’m here, it’s okay.” He was calm, but he was so full of fear. I could feel it. So I was getting my head
back together, and he said to me, “Well, I don’t see
a third date happening here.” Excuse me?! I would’ve expected you to at least
text me that after we said goodbye! (Laughter) (Applause) It would have been
a little bit more tactful. So in addition to
acceptance of other people, you need to come to terms
with your own chronic illness. Acceptance is the big job
of the chronically ill. No, it doesn’t happen overnight. It can take years and even a lifetime. Acceptance brings up ideas,
such as, what does this mean for me? Will I be able to find a partner? Will I have kids? Will I be able to raise these kids? Will I find a job
or live in constant poverty? These thoughts
can be so overwhelming, and it takes a lot out of you. Also, when we are children,
we are told, “Dream big!” “What do you want to do
when you’re an adult?” I have known that I have wanted to be
a social worker since the age of ten. I don’t know about you,
but for me, that’s a long time. I’m a registered social worker, but I don’t know if I will be able to do
what I want to do in my line of practice. I also have a good friend, Vanessa,
who used to be a competitive dancer. Then she was struck with arthritis. She had to completely alter her life path because of a diagnosis that had no cure. How would you feel
if you had to give up your dream? So I’ve thrown a lot at you
with regards to chronic illness and what it’s like to live with one and all of the things
that you have to go through, and you might be a little bit
overwhelmed at this point, but don’t worry – that’s why I’m here. So my three-point plan is this – super-easy; you can follow it. First of all, accept that there is
no such thing as a norm. Everybody is different with regards to mental health,
ability, and well-being. Accept that, and act accordingly. Also, you may be struck down
with a chronic illness at some point in your life too. My second plan to action
is to have empathy. You have no idea what people
are going through on a day-to-day basis. If you do, though,
reach out to that person. Tell them, “Hey, I’m here for you,
and I’m willing to do whatever I can.” My final call to action is –
consider this: Maybe a person’s chronic illness
isn’t their problem, but your problem, and the problem of society at large. If we had a more inclusive paradigm that included people with chronic illness, we might be able to pull people
out of the hell that is chronic illness. (Applause) (Cheers)

Healing a Fracture with a Fracture | Penn Medicine

Healing a Fracture with a Fracture | Penn Medicine


(slow inspiring music) – Heather’s case is actually
fairly typical of what we see in our Limb Salvage and
Extremity Reconstruction Center. Young, active individual,
unanticipated injury. Roller derby for Heather was a passion, and she broke her tibia. She went to a local hospital, and she had a rod placed, and from a technical perspective, everything looked great, and Heather went on for several months, rehabing, trying to recover, but continued to have
pain at her fracture site. Why didn’t this young, healthy person, with a well-aligned
tibia, heal her fracture? We did a fairly extensive work-up on her. We looked at the way her
fracture was aligned, and then we got a CT scan of her leg. And her CT scan clearly showed a nonunion. The two ends of the bone
were not coming together. And so, we had a very lengthy conversation at that point about what
to do for her nonunion. And there’s lots of options, right? We talked about things like do nothing, you might do okay, the
hardware might break, and if it breaks, then we know we have to
do something, it may not, you’ll always have a little bit of pain, and just don’t do the
activities that cause pain. We talked about doing something as simple as injecting the bone, the nonunion site with
bone marrow aspirate. Taking bone marrow from the body, concentrating it and injecting
it into the fraction site, giving the biology a
kickstart, if you will. We talked about taking out
the screws and dynamizing her. What that means is basically
we take the screws out, and let the fracture
compress itself over the rod. Almost like it slides
and squeezes itself down. But getting into the technical
aspects of it a little bit, she had broken her tibia,
but not her fibula, and because the fibula hadn’t broken, my hypothesis at least was
the fibula was taking some of the load from the tibia and not allowing the tibia
to compress and heal. So when we did her surgery, we took out the existing
rod that was there, we actually broke her fibula, we did what’s called a
osteotomy of her fibula, to create a fracture there. Then we put a new rod in and
from a technical perspective, we compressed the fracture
in the operating room. We’re not talking inches
or centimeters here, we’re talking a millimeters
of bone compression, put new screws in the rod, and let her walk on it right away. Now, some would argue that breaking the fibula is somewhat
controversial as well, but based on her symptoms, based on her CT, based on the mechanics, based on what was already done, it made the most sense. She was aggressive with her rehab, she was an active participant in her care, she was motivated, she was enthusiastic. At six weeks, she had no pain. By three months, we
had her back in skates, and by four and a half months, we had her back to contact sports. I think for Heather, Penn Medicine really provided
a unique opportunity, because of our approach to complex malunions and nonunions, infections, and complex polytrauma. We leverage our
experience, our technology, and our various clinical partners to optimize the outcome
for patients like Heather. (slow inspiring music)

8 Feb 2018 news today – benefit, relief mental health advice and news


hi I’m Andy Bailey from and the Emmys
video diary walking and talking v-log on Facebook and on YouTube and E and M s
that’s where you see me that’s where you find me come along and you’ll be part my
community now every morning I have Google Alerts go off well I shouldn’t
come into my inbox and tell me about certain things to do with multiple
sclerosis depression anxiety those kind of things so I can keep up to date with
what goes on in those things these are some of the things that have caught my
eye this morning we’ve got the social care system is in crisis okay with
patients receiving 15-minute visits what the hell are you gonna do with 15
minutes forget about it oh dear see what are you gonna do with 15 minute things
what are you gonna do what are you gonna do what you’re gonna do come in come in
hey yeah we’re gonna talk okay bye and forget about it hmm
what are you gonna do with 15 minutes there are some people that are only
getting one minute visits please please that’s unacceptable there are these are
the most vulnerable people in our society they’re elderly the disabled the
the mentally healthfully challenged people the vulnerable people and they’re
not getting proper thing I can understand where the NHS is coming from
they’ve got a cut corn not cut corners but cut costs it’s the bottom line
because other people are telling them that but you can’t just look at the
price because look at the cost of that my friend says his mum my Polish friend
says his mom says cheap is expensive and that’s so true especially in this case
if you’re keeping it out on on the assessments on the care on the system
within and looks after the vulnerable people that’s gonna cost you in the
future in palliative care in depression for the
people that are the carers oh there’s so many though a ripple effect go now so
you take care of this you take care of a lot of the other things happen but they
can’t do that because that bits expensive to do
they don’t look ahead to see when it costs in the future the bean counters
talking about bean counters the DWP bean counters they’ve got to review 220,000
benefit claims so people with mental health conditions like autism depression
anxiety etc etc all those people those kind of things are gonna be reassessed
and that’s because dwb have just messed it up and talking of bean counters the
bean counters work out that how much does it cost to refuse you your pip and
how much does it cost to fight it in court and then how much will it cost if
they get told to do the proper job and they worked it out and the balance is
it’s cheaper for them to say screw off me oh you can’t have nothing and then
people like oh shit alright then because you know they might have mental health
anxiety and they don’t want to cause a fast and they’re too guilty about stuff
cos being stigmatized for having mental health problems mmm or do they know that
only a certain amount of people will appeal only a certain amount of people
will take you to court judges have ruled that most of these cases that come into
the court for appeal shouldn’t even have got to the appeal the police used a
Crown Prosecution Service system and if they don’t have the evidence you don’t
get taken to court that’s how it works for criminals that’s why the everybody
the knives everyone me because police have got to prove it before they any
even tell you to call different with the dwb a tox and independent Assessors
because it’s cheaper for them to say no because they know that a certain
percentage enough people will not appeal for it to be more profitable to say no
than it would be to just give you what you deserve and that’s just business
that’s how it works unfortunately that’s the that’s the game
so you’ve got to appeal especially if you’ve got mental health problems all
your caring for someone with mental health problems like autism depression
anxiety etc so stay on it good news there for you yeah now some good news
they could drinking four cups of coffee might help your ms well mines the
cappuccino of I said don’t do encapture anymore because the milk makes me fat
milk is basically baby cow growing juice they would grow baby cows with with milk
I have soy milk now cuz I’m a hippie can is help huh
but I knew that caffeine is supposed to be good for you either got a recipe from
Jamie Oliver how to make granola dust which I have everyday with vanilla
soymilk oh it’s gorgeous with some frozen fruit in Israel uh Aimee GERD
it’s so good so caffeine I put bear caffeine in my
granola as caffeine is supposed to be good for you I don’t
I’m not sure it can be as simple as against just having drinks of coffee but
you know puppy now I want to tell you about anxiety or overcoming a particular
period of anxiety this is really good this system is something that I use
constantly when I’m anxious in the mornings okay look at this try this if
you start to get me shaky there’s a woman she called Mel Robbins she wrote a
book called five four three two one the five-second rule she did the audiobook
as well listen to it I’ve read it is brilliant and she’s only telling you
stuff that you already know the best thing about it is she’s not inventing
anything new she’s using references to Harvard and to medical studies and stuff
and really is a good thing but she says something in one of her books about
anxiety she says if you ever been in the car as a passenger drive it doesn’t
matter and a card just misses you like you like internally externally whether
it shows all night doesn’t matter in turning your boom and your brains out
Wow I need weed I then fight or flight or it’s okay it’s over calm down calm
down everything’s go over this guy was it
gradually together now anxiety is like having that but it happened at the
kitchen sink just you and there is a disconnect there from what your brain
can see and experience and what you’re actually feeling the chemicals that have
been released in your brain the adrenaline the cortisone whatever it is
that gets released when you reveal like that so that’s what
anxiety is to her and it does make sense so if you ever get that kind of oh
here’s something that will help you because I used it loads and it does work
it really does it worth Gojo okay when you’re on your own and you’re feeling it
dumb at no one I know are you doing it right listen look find five things right
the you can see actually look at the things okay I can see a blind I see a
lighthouse thing for my VR exam I can see my audio mixer flashing there I can
see the bottle of water that I used to drink water and I can see an off monitor
I can see their things don’t just pluck things that are able to be seen but
things are you see right now it’s called grounding that’s part of mind for us
four things that you can touch you can reach out and touch I can reach out and
touch this mouse I can reach out and touch a keyboard I can reach out and
touch this cable feel what that cables I use mindfulness again I can reach out
and touch a vicks vapor nasal never I can imagine what it smells like
talkative things three things that you can hear right now that you can actually
feel the vibrations going into your brain I can hear the fan on the computer I can in the fridge downstairs gonna I can either rain outside hitting some
windows and we’re mindful things you can actually hear not things that can be
heard okay two things that you can smell I can smell the soap on my hands the
vanilla soap or lush I really like that so I like it a lot
well I can smell it is warm from the radiator it’s got that smell you know
yeah I know one thing that you can taste now this is something you could lick us
puros but i prefer something that can already taste cuz there’s always a
memory of something that i tasted before oh it’s the steamed veggies I had for
lunch I’ve tasted even the cheese right and that is the kind of thing the
mindfulness thing and that’s how you can reconnect and once you’ve done that you
realize you’re not anxious anymore just take five things five four three two one
just take a moment do it well worth it may I like it now good news if you have
a zit acne is increase risk of depression isn’t that good news they
would look I’m gonna spot oh good no the what they’re saying is within the
first five years about my acne you’re more likely to get depressed I remember
I got well sad and depressed one of those gonads is it actually I wasn’t I
was almost quite proud of that aspect we gonna draw a big circle ads are going
sit with a big arrow but when you get older is different and so now they’re
advising doctors in the first five years keep an eye out for depression and
depressive signs and people and GPS are trained to notify and notice these
things so those are the things that picked out in the news today I am loony
o of the geek fun I am Andy Bailey on M s video diary and Andy an MS on YouTube
and loony fun on some other streaming places by Mandy this has been the MS
news today this morning welcome see you later – louve did it oh I could do that
you know