How Can Apps Help People with Brain Injury?

How Can Apps Help People with Brain Injury?


Apps are really important for individuals
with traumatic brain injury and PTSD and other kinds of brain conditions. What I found is that they really allow individuals
to apply cognitive skills in a very practical functional way in a way other than often they
get in more traditional kids of therapies. When an individual has a brain injury they
have difficulty with organization and time management and memory and decision making. And one of the interesting things about apps
is that apps allow them to apply strategies to deal with some of those issues that they
might be facing on an everyday life. But the apps give them immediate feedback
that they can then use in order to sort of determine whether or not they’re on the
right track. Whereas if you’re using something like paper
and pencil it’s not so easy to see the results. The other thing about apps is that they’re
with them every day, all day long. And so they’re able to actually use the
applications throughout the day to ben them and to help them with some of the cognitive
struggles that they have.

🔴 RELAXING Ambient MUSIC for STRESS RELIEF, Study, Meditation, Sleep


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Sleep music or sleep music is the perfect music to help you relax and go to sleep deeply, leaving your mind blank, and enjoy a deep sleep. Sleep music is the best music to relieve stress, reduce insomnia and promote sleep. Quiet sleep music uses delta waves and soft instrumental music to help achieve deep relaxation and sleep. Relaxing sleep music can be used as background, meditation, relaxation, calm and sleep music. Let our relaxing and soothing music help you enjoy a deep and relaxing sleep. Music to reduce anxiety, musical to stop thinking, music to blank your mind: Our music to reduce anxiety, facilitates the relaxation of the body after a long day of work and helps you enter a state of perfect tranquility. Spa music, nature sounds, soft piano sounds, musical instruments that are easy to hear and appreciate favor a complete state of relaxation. RELAX MUSIC music is great for massage therapy, and our music will help you relax your body and mind.

What is Illness Anxiety Disorder?

What is Illness Anxiety Disorder?


Hello, this is Dr. Grande. Today’s question is what is Illness Anxiety Disorder If you find this video to be interesting or helpful, please like it and subscribe to my channel. That way you won’t miss any new videos. Now when we talk about illness anxiety disorder, we talk about a mental disorder where an individual is preoccupied with concern about having a serious illness and this is an interesting disorder because it’s fairly similar to Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and there’s even a debate in a mental health community About whether or not Illness Anxiety disorder is really just a variant of OCD So when we look at the criteria for Illness Anxiety Disorder there’s another interesting feature a lot of mental disorders in the DSM have a symptom criteria section and Then other criteria so there may be Nine symptoms in the symptom criteria section and somebody might have to meet four or five of those symptoms to qualify For that criterion and then there are other criteria that have to qualify for as well With illness anxiety disorder all of the different criteria are required There is no section in the DSM with illness anxiety disorder That has a number of symptoms where somebody only has to meet a certain Number less than that for the diagnosis. For example if we consider Borderline Personality Disorder that disorder has nine symptoms in the symptom criteria But an individual only needs to have five of those to qualify for that diagnosis So again with Illness Anxiety Disorder, all the symptoms are required. So the first symptom is a preoccupation with having or acquiring a serious illness now the DSM doesn’t specifically say that this would be a mental disorder or a medical disorder but most of the time we interpret this as relating to a possible medical disorder a concern over having or getting a medical disorder because we usually conceptualize this first criterion as being related to medical disorders this brings up an important point in terms of the distinction between a talk therapist and a physician For example, I have a PhD in counselor education and supervision and I’m a licensed counselor I’m not a physician and most talk therapists are not physicians either. So with this particular diagnosis of illness anxiety disorder as a talk therapist you would be working with somebody who has complaints or concerns about a medical disorder. So it’s important to make the referral to a physician so that you know if they in fact have the disorder or don’t That’s an important element in terms of the mental health treatment to know if that medical disorder is really there or not. Now, of course a lot of times when we treat individuals with Illness Anxiety Disorder, they have been referred by a physician and we already have the information that shows that they did not qualify for a diagnosis of any type of medical disorder at least not the medical disorder that they’re worried about. The second criterion is that there are little or no somatic symptoms. So there’s another disorder which is difficult to differentiate from Illness Anxiety Disorder called Somatic Symptom Disorder and I have another video that discusses these two disorders together. With Illness Anxiety Disorder there can be mild somatic symptoms but that’s really not the emphasis as the symptom criterion suggests the anxiety is not coming primarily from physical sensations of the person’s having but rather the meaning or significance of having the illness that they’re worried about having. The third symptom criterion is the individual is experiencing a high level anxiety about health-related concerns. The fourth is that there’s excessive health-related behavior like checking or maladaptive avoidance, so a lot of times we think of this disorder and compare it to OCD, it’s this particular symptom criterion that makes it difficult to distinguish the two because that health-related behavior as I mentioned oftentimes involves checking and of course OCD oftentimes involves checking. The fifth symptom criteria is that the disturbance has been present for six months. but the illness that the person is worried about can change in that time. So a lot of times we think of Illness Anxiety Disorder, we think of one particular illness that the person is worried about having or acquiring. But sometimes with this disorder if they have evidence that shows that they don’t have a particular medical disorder they were worried about, Then they might develop a fear about another potential medical disorder. So the illness can change but the disturbance would be present for at least six months and The sixth symptom criterion is that this disturbance is not better explained by another mental disorder and there’s a number of mental disorders listed in the DSM as examples. One of them is OCD. Again, emphasizing this difficult differentiation between illness anxiety disorder and OCD It’s important to note here as well that somebody can have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Illness Anxiety Disorder at the same time These can be comorbid and oftentimes they are comorbid. This six symptom criterion that not better explained by another mental disorder criterion doesn’t mean that the two can’t co-occur. It just means that if you’re looking at a presentation that you think is Illness Anxiety Disorder and the symptoms are in fact better explained by OCD then you would consider OCD over illness anxiety disorder. This can certainly become confusing but the term not better explained doesn’t mean that the two are mutually exclusive, that the two disorders cannot co-occur. Now it’s also important to note that with illness anxiety disorder. There are two subtypes These are not specifiers but rather subtypes So an individual would have to have one and only one of these subtypes There’s the care-seeking type and the care-avoiding type. So an individual with Illness Anxiety Disorder would have to be categorized as one of these two types, they could not be assigned both types. Some other interesting associated characteristics with Illness Anxiety Disorder include that there’s usually not a desire for perfectionism with this disorder like we would see with OCD and also, in terms of what medical disorder or serious illness somebody’s worried about it’s oftentimes not a communicable illness so the concern would more likely be over a medical disorder like cancer or heart disease as opposed to influenza. Now in terms of the treatment for Illness Anxiety Disorder, we don’t have a lot of research on the treatment effectiveness for illness anxiety disorder specifically, but generally we believe that mental health talk therapy is somewhat effective in relieving the symptoms of Illness Anxiety Disorder. I hope you found this description of Illness Anxiety Disorder to be interesting. Thanks for watching.

A young person’s experience of living with a mental illness – Wagga Wagga

A young person’s experience of living with a mental illness – Wagga Wagga


I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder back in 2010 after I finished the year 12 HSC and so now I’ve been I guess recovering with bipolar disorder for the past five years living with the bipolar disorder as a young person is at times very challenging most people when they’re between the ages of 18 to 22 are out partying and a very carefree they don’t have to think about all of these other things so for me going out and wanting to drink with friends I have to think of a lot of other different various things and at times it makes me think that I guess I used to be the one that was the the life of the party and at times now I have to think gee I must be the boring one so it can be very isolating and can mean that your friendship circles reduce dramatically and at the moment I’m currently trying to understand how I’m supposed to get through that because I guess the word to really describe how it is is isolating at times I definitely think that the mental health system living in Wagga is very uneven I guess it was comments from my psychiatrist in April this year when I said to him you know I’m, I’m wanting to have this you know huge Empire for business and he said to me Sam I hope that you’re getting ready I said you wouldn’t what should I be getting ready for and he said that when you’re about 40 your cognitive function is going to decline your memory is going to decline when I asked him what can I be doing he said nothing I think that that type of mentality within the mental health system isn’t helpful I think the proper the approach that needs to be taken needs to be one that’s very flexible to each person that’s living with that mental illness I think that what needs to be considered is that everybody is going to have a different experience or lived experience of living with bipolar disorder and I believe that mental health specialists need to not be closed mind in their approach as they speak to each of those individuals one of the main things I’ve seen or have learnt from other people that have been diagnosis they often go to their GP and their GP will write a script however that scripts never followed up and I guess their cause is often lost I would really like to see some more rules or regulations around GPS in their involvement with psychiatric illnesses as well as more support groups for the use so that they can come to that space where they can voice how they’re feeling and then get support for that I wouldv’e thought in today’s modern society that we would be taking a more holistic approach to mental illness one that’s not only with medication but where you can come to have help from a dietitian sport and actually creating this routine because for me that’s the absolute reason why I’m currently managing my bipolar disorder you

Medication and mental illness


>>Jen Aboki: I’ve had a very tattered relationship
with medication. It’s not my favourite part of the journey. Often when you’re in the acute
setting in the hospital, which is where I was, they don’t really talk about other aspects
like ‘how are you going today?’ It’s like ‘here’s your medication, take it’. Medication
for me really represents from people are certainty that if you take this, you’ll be well. And
I don’t believe that that’s all you need to do to stay well.
>>Pat Beinke: I had to do what was told otherwise I would be put back in hospital. I was in
jail within my own body anyway but then I was also in jail with what they were telling
me. So I was outside but still not free. I really wasn’t in the right headspace to remember
too much of it because you’re a little bit like a zombie, I suppose you could call it.
>>Kerin O’Halloran: No-one wants to see their child diminished you know. She was a very
smart person. She was very clever. She had tremendous political wit. I mean you should
have seen her political cartoons [laughs]. They were really a joy. And then you see them
being diminished, bit by bit, because of a medication.
>>Dr Roderick McKay: The first key issue is medication should very rarely be the first
line option. Definitely for mild to moderate mental illness, first line option should be
looking at your lifestyle, things you’re doing, not doing. It also means looking at what sorts
of talking therapy you might be comfortable with. Clearly sometimes some people are not
comfortable with talking therapy. That’s legitimate as well.
>>Dr Michael Tam: The evidence would suggest that psychological therapies, interpersonal
therapies, more psychodynamic based supportive therapies, those sort of approaches I think
are really first line. People with the more severe end, severe spectrum of illness, using
pharmacotherapy – you would consider it earlier.>>Dr Roderick McKay: There’s never one right
medication. It’s always the right medication, for the person, for a purpose. What’s best
for a person is very much dependent on that person and their desires as well as the illness
they’ve got.>>Jen Aboki: To me medication represents the
whole clinical process of psychiatry, of hospitalisation, of the whole process that kind of ties in
with that. Taking medication every day means to me that you need to rely on something to
be well. And so what if that thing wasn’t there? Does that mean you can’t rely on yourself
to be well? The impact of knowing you need to take something forever or indefinitely
is really scary.>>Kerin O’Halloran: She became very toxic
often on medication. So we live with a lot of very severe side effects. She had quite
significant weight gain, she had breast milk, she looked six months pregnant, menstruation
had stopped. So there was all those very severe hormonal impacts.
>>Pat Beinke: I suppose it held me down a bit, it felt like to me, because I had to
do the monthly blood test, I had to make sure I was available to do that. It also makes
you tired. The weight issues and also heart problems. I’ve had a heart attack and I’ve
got tachycardia so they really have to monitor that.
>>Judith Mackson: So if you try to see it from a consumer’s point of view, when adverse
events occur, that they’re actually able to be appropriately managed, and being responsive
enough to see when things change. You need to step in and play a role.
>>Dr Roderick McKay: Medication for mental illness is the same as medication for any
other illness. There’s side effects as well as benefits. And so it’s being able to have
that conversation up front about the fact there are risks as well as benefits and discussing
with the person which risks they’re prepared to take.
>>Dr Michael Tam: Trying to make sure my patients feel comfortable having those discussions
with me is a very important part of making sure the right person gets the right medication
for the right length of time. It’s not just about mental illness, it’s also about the
whole person care.>>Dr Roderick McKay: Unless each person that’s
prescribing is actually aware of the range of problems a person has, be they physical
health problems, social problems, mental health problems, and the medications they’re on,
then things are likely to go wrong. In terms of how do collaborative roles work best, the
key thing is having clear communication and agreeing what the roles are. Because there’s
many ways of working best, but none of them work well unless you communicate.
>>Dr Michael Tam: I think at the moment unfortunately it does tend to be fairly fragmented. One
of the themes that tends to come out is that they have to repeat their story time and time
again to individuals and that becomes a very tiring process. It can be a very re-traumatising
process.>>Kerin O’Halloran: There was all this lack
of continuity. You never knew who to speak to. Just not working in a team.
>>Judith Mackson: I think one of the things that needs to be in place to enable a consumer
to get best possible care is the complete medication regime is known to your providers.
And also the goals of therapy, that the intention of the treatment plan is actually communicated.
>>Jen Aboki: They are very reluctant when I’ve told them in the past I want to get off
medication. I ended up bringing my husband along to an appointment and I said the same
thing to them and then they changed their tune. They said, ‘ok well if your partner’s
here to support you, ok we’ll look at reducing the medication’. I was upset that it took
that. Not everyone knows that they have a voice or a choice.
>>Pat Beinke: I liked going to see the psychiatrist. She actually showed empathy, she would remember
everything. She would obviously make her notes after the appointment. I suppose when you’re
schizophrenic and they’re writing in front of you, it doesn’t really help. I didn’t mind
just opening up and talking to her which made me feel comfortable just to talk and not hide
anything from her.>>Kerin O’Halloran: When it’s a team and everyone’s
equal, there’s kind of this open dialogue. To treat her with respect and give her a very
clear role in the decision making that is incredibly helpful.
>>Dr Michael Tam: Almost all the actual care is provided by the consumer themselves and
they’re carers. What we’re really doing in the longer term is empowering consumers and
the carers so that they can recover.>>Jen Aboki: I can look back and go it’s come
in handy when I have been unwell because it has gotten me well a lot sooner I guess than
if there wasn’t any medication available.>>Pat Beinke: Medication was a big part for
me obviously. It did help me. But, there is no one solution I don’t think for every single
person with mental illness. She actually wanted to help me get off the medication which was
brilliant. So I’m like, let’s give it a shot. It took three years. It’s been nearly a year
now, no meds.>>Jen Aboki: We need to be treated as equals.
The consumer has the lived knowledge and the lived experience and those are equally as
important.

Being Trans is No Longer a Mental Illness?!

Being Trans is No Longer a Mental Illness?!


Hey! My name’s Grayson, and welcome to my channel. So– Oh, that was a weird noise. Did you hear that? That was strange. Um, so the World Health Organization has declassified
being trans as a mental illness. This has gotten a lot of mixed reactions from
what I gather. Most of it is positive, but I thought I would
present, I guess, both uh… Both sides, so to speak, of the issue and
then give my opinion on it. So, let’s start with the backlash a little
bit, or the concerns, with this. From what I’ve heard, a lot of the concern
comes from insurance coverage. People are worried, now that it’s no longer
considered a mental health issue, that it’s not going to warrant insurance covering things
like gender-affirming surgeries or hormone replacement therapy. I can understand where they’re coming from
with that. It is a concern. We need access to those kinds of things. But the reality is that this is remaining
a diagnosis. It’s just not in the same category. So, the International Classification of Diseases,
the ICD– The new version is the ICD 11. In the previous version, the ICD 10, it was
listed under mental health. It was considered a mental health disorder. That wasn’t really a great thing because you
had maybe transphobic people who would say, “It’s not a real thing. It’s an illness, a disease.” Uh, but in the newer version, the ICD 11,
it’s listed under sexual health, and so it’s now called Gender Incongruence. And all it means is your gender identity doesn’t
match the sex you were assigned at birth. But again, some people are worried that this
is a move towards demedicalizing, and there are people in this community who think that
being trans is a medical condition, it is a mental health issue. And, kind of separate from that, the one other
concern I’ve heard is that it moves to the sexual health category. Some people are concerned that that would
reduce teen’s and youth access to things like either therapy or, um, medical treatment because
sexual– sexuality in general– is very much stigmatized for younger people. I think that concern is definitely warranted
to some degree because it’s true. Sex ed, anything to do with sex, is very taboo
for younger people, at least in this culture. So, that’s kind of the concern from some people,
is that it’s demedicalizing it. Some say it’s ignoring the fact– the mental
health aspect of being trans as well. You know, dysphoria and such. And then on the other hand, there’s also a
lot of celebration because this is a big deal, you know. To not have being trans considered a mental
illness anymore is a huge deal because it reduces a ton of stigma behind people thinking
that we are delusional or crazy for– for, you know, “thinking” we’re this way. It reduces a lot of that, and it stops people
from being able to say that because it’s no longer classified that way. And because this is an international thing,
I think that that could help more conservative countries to– to kind of move past uh…
some of their older ways of thinking. There’s also some celebration because it’s
still a diagnosis. It’s still medicalized enough to the point
where we can have access to medical care. And personally, I think this is a good thing. I don’t think that this is going to have many
negative impacts, as long as we have access to care, which I think is still gonna be the
case. There’s no signs that it won’t be. It is gonna reduce stigma. It’s giving our community some ammunition
to– to kind of fight back with as far as, “No, this is real. This is not just some delusion or some mental
illness.” Yes, dysphoria is still very much um… a
mental health issue, I think. It affects your ability to– to kind of function
day-to-day, and it’s very difficult to deal with. Do I think that’s still kind of a mental health
issue? Sure. You know, as far as… There’s a difference between dysphoria and
being trans. Um, and so dysphoria is, in my mind, still
a mental health issue because it interferes with, you know, your daily functioning. It’s distressing. It, you know, it’s persistent as well. It makes sense that this would be a mental
illness and just being trans, just having a gender identity that doesn’t match the sex
you were assigned at birth– That’s just a variation in human beings. Like it’s not– It’s not inherently an issue,
I guess. It’s the dysphoria that’s the problem. So, yeah. I think this is a good thing, and I also like
that it’s listed under sexual health, rather than mental health, because that’s saying
that our brains are not the issue here. That’s saying more that the way our bodies
developed, or anatomical sex, I guess– It’s saying that that’s more of the issue than
our brain, and I like that. And in the end, honestly, I doubt this is
going to have huge impacts um… onhow trans people are cared for, at least medically-wise,
because the DSM, which is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, which is put out by the
APA, the American Psychological Association– That’s still really what we use, at least
here in the US, as far as diagnosis and treatment goes. The DSM-V still has the diagnosis of Gender
Dysphoria, which is what all insurance coverage is really based off of. So, this new change might change stigma, um,
in the US, which is great. I think that’s amazing. Uh, but I don’t think, at least right now,
it’s really gonna change much as far as care. Um, I’m gonna link here the video that the
World Health Organization put out regarding this change. In it, they explain, you know, why they did
it, and what it really means, and what changes were made. So, check that out. I watched it, and it really helped to kind
of explain this because from what I’ve seen, there isn’t a ton of really clear information
right now on that sort of thing, so I figured go right to the source of where it came from. You’ll be better off. That’s this video. Thank you for watching! My name is Grayson. Have a wonderful day.

Gay Man Confronts Mental Illness, Addiction And His HIV Diagnosis With The Help Of Others.


So my name is Coleman Goode. I’m from Hallettsville, Texas. When I was 25 years old, I checked myself
into a mental hospital because I tried to commit suicide. I, also, at that time had left my boyfriend
who was living with HIV. I was on meth – crystal meth. I’ve been doing that for, on and off for a
couple – 2 years. So my life was on not at its highest point. And I found myself one day in this lime green
two-toned room with a nurse coming into the room and sitting down in front of me. It was March 21, 2005 – 2006 and she told
me that I was HIV positive. I remember staring at her and she – so I think
she was waiting for me to have a reaction but I didn’t. So she responded, “Well, you don’t seem
to be too surprised.” And I’ll never forget this – I said, “Well
if you’ve been doing things I’ve been doing, you wouldn’t be surprised.” I remember leaving the room and I remember
just feeling like the entire world is fell down on me, like what am I gonna do? I’m 25. I’m now HIV+, I’m probably going to die. You know, these are the thoughts that went
through my mind because I didn’t know anyone with HIV, I didn’t know what that looked like. I just didn’t know what my life looked like
after that. So I broke down. I’m in this mental hospital with people I
don’t even know, but they came up to me, they’re hugging me, and they were being supportive
and they didn’t even – like, they didn’t know me. Like, they were some people I just met maybe
the day before, but it was such support that I didn’t understand it or didn’t really expect
it. I felt like the nurses have to be supportive
but these were, like, people – like actual patients. And I jokingly said my time in the hospital
was like “Girl, Interrrupted.” I was like Winona Ryder and we were just these
cast of characters of like, you know, the Island of Misfit Toys. You know, and we were cast away and yet there
was this moment of real connection and it felt very genuine. I mean actually, I decided to call my mom. And so I remember picking up the phone and
calling her and just letting her know where I was, because at that point, my mom and I
weren’t really that close. So I don’t think I had spoken to her in
– probably in months. And so I called her and got her on the phone
and told her that I was HIV+ and that I was, you know, suffering from depression and I
was in a mental hospital because I tried to kill myself. And she was like, “Okay…” She later told me that when she hung up the
phone, she, like, broke down sort of crying. And I knew that was going to hurt her but
it was the first time I was ever actually able to be really honest with her in a very
long time and I think that later played very greatly into our relationship getting a lot
better. You know, later when I was released from the
hospital after being there for three months, getting myself care, you know, finding out
that I was suffering from depression, I had a great therapist that was like this lesbian
and she was telling me about all these great things to do in the community and just kind
of helping me, I guess, feel good about myself, and telling me that there is support for me. The whole experience in the hospital and I
– it sounds really crazy, was so beautiful because I just felt very supported for the
first time and very, very supported by people that didn’t know me and didn’t have – I feel
like they didn’t have – there was nothing they could get out of supporting me and loving
me, but it was very beautiful for me. The hospital set up so I can go to another
– an HIV+ sober house facility. So I got moved there and from there I decided
to go to treatment. I decided that maybe treatment with a better
option for me. And so I got to be in this 90-day program
with people living with HIV, and I got to be newly diagnosed and work through what that
meant and work through what it was – what my life is gonna be like. Through this same program, through this same
agency, I was able to move into another halfway house which is for people living with HIV,
all the way up through a three-quarter home and stayed two years. And another HIV service – agency helped me
get a job. I did job training. And they found me an apartment. You know, I was getting my life together. I was making friends and developing relationships
and finding my first community. I would love to say that I stayed sober for
all the time since then and that things were magically better but it wasn’t, I haven’t
– I’ve struggled with my sobriety. I’ve struggled with my mental illness. Luckily because of the support I have, it
never got to the point where it was in 2005 where I was alone and felt desperate enough
to take my own life. If you had told me in 2005 when I was – I
had been diagnosed at 25 as being HIV+ March 21st, that I would be where I am today…
that I would be an advocate, that I get to go into the community and teach and teach
about advocacy and go to Washington DC and go on the Hill and fight against the Trump
administration, it’s – I would have laughed. I just would have laughed because that’s not
what I thought my life would be. Slowly and surely it’s gotten better. And I’ve developed this really good core of
people around me and I found my place in the gay community. The value of surrounding myself with good
people, positive people is just – I can’t really put a price on it. It’s just really important thing for people
to understand that there is a place for them. They might just have to look for it or make
their own place, but there is a place for people and I think there’s – you don’t have
to be alone if you don’t want to be.

On Frustration & Feeling Like a Failure With Chronic Illness #DisabledYouTuber


Are you chronically ill and self-hate is getting you down? I got you covered [chipmunk voice], because that’s what’s coming next! [cute xylophone theme plays] I know I look fancy, but I don’t feel fancy. [sings Blue (Da Ba Dee) by Eiffel 65] I’m blue – da ba dee da ba dye – da ba Hi there! I’m Victoria and welcome to Chronicles, a place where we, Kate and Victoria, are just trying to make invisible illness visible. If you’ve stumbled onto this corner of the web, for the first time, I’d love for you to be a part of our family! As we chronicle ha ha ha? our sick-as adventures. We post weekly, when we have the spoons… Which is almost never, but anyway! Onto the video! If you’ve been following Chronicles, you would have noticed that I haven’t been around… Aside from some really personal stuff, which I can’t talk about – and general horrible health which there’s no point talking about right now – I’ve been dealing with the very debilitating feeling of feeling like a complete failure of a person. So today, I wanted to talk about feeling like a failure and frustration with chronic illness. [breathy laugh/heavy breathing/turns to cry] I don’t want this video to be depressing – like I had other videos planned, but I just wanted to be real – I mean, honesty and authenticity is the point of this whole channel. I know that this isn’t something that is just, me, so I thought it’s important to explore it today. Disclaimer: I do want to point out that I totally know all of these feelings that I have come from a completely
internalised ableist view, and this unrealistic strive for perfection that can’t exist in my body, because I’m sick and you know, it’s not my fault, bla bla bla, don’t be so hard on yourself, but you know easier said than done. I am a type A perfectionist, and my ultimate flaw is being the absolute worst to myself [scoffs at self]. I’m really hard on myself, and ableism is like, insidiously present in this world… So existing as me is like, just not acceptable, to society and cultural standards. [SIGH] It’s impossible not to internalise all of that and get confused, and not feel worthless in the process. Feeling like a failure is a feeling, it doesn’t mean that I am a failure, I get that. [inhales] But, it’s not a feeling I can control. I somehow always come back to this same place. My best just isn’t good enough… Or at least it’s not good enough to me, or Society. I’m trying to exist in this body that really doesn’t want to do much. It’s like a huge tug of war. The Spirit is willing but the flesh, the
flesh, it’s weak. Right now, I feel like, so crap and it’s raining, but I knew that I had to make this video, because I haven’t been able to make any videos like literally haven’t had the capacity. …Mentally, physically, emotionally, a lot of
stuff. It’s really hard not to see that as a failure. And I know that like, all of you guys are so supportive, and so like just cool about us like leaving and taking care of our bodies – but like, when I don’t follow through with my own promises that I’ve made to myself… it makes me feel like I’ve just completely failed my whole life. It’s part of how my brain works and it’s like no matter how much therapy I get, these feelings never leave… Because of this constant total war within myself between: ‘yes I want to do this! and ‘I (physically) can’t do this.’ I despise having to cancel the things that I want to do. I want to do everything, but here I am, I drop after a shower so… How do I? How? HOW? Like, I’m doing graded exercise, because I have chronic fatigue syndrome (or CFS/ME). In my graded exercise, the most I can walk comfortably, without making myself feel any worse, is three minutes and 45 seconds. It’s frustrating, and this video is basically gonna be a rant of frustration, because my body can’t keep up with what my mind wishes it could do. As a disabled spoonie, there are true words that are the bane of my existence: ‘I can’t.’ It just kills me not to have… the choice to make memories and take opportunities on a whim. The amount of things that I’ve had to give up because of my health… My body will just let me down. I despise missing out. My soul aches for exploration and adventure. Like, the other day, I was going to go to see one of my favourite artists, Nai Palm of Hiatus Kaiyote. And I had the ticket and I was like planning to go. And then, the night came, it took me so long to decide whether it was worth going, because I knew that afterwards there would be consequences for me going out. OR I could stay home and probably cry my eyes out, because this was like the millionth thing that I have had to cancel. UGH. so I took the plunge and I actually just went, because I couldn’t handle having to say ‘I can’t go’ one more time. It’s like I want to [stumbles on words] I want to be nice to myself and say, ‘okay you know we had a shower, we ate, we
exercised, we like did one thing that we wanted to do, we made progress… But then there’s this other side of me that’s like ‘that’s not good enough.’ I guess, also the main problem is that like [tuts] I set really high unrealistic expectations for myself, and… I always have to remind myself that
I’m not able-bodied. ‘No Victoria, you can’t… make a video edit it and post it in a day.’ I know that I can do the things and be the person that I want to be, but
my body is just like in the way all the time. And so… I don’t know if I can do those things and be who I want to be, because, I only have so much control over
this [points to self]. So please [exhale] Never tell a sick person that they are in any way lucky, and dismiss their feelings if they open up to you about these things – because – imagine you’ve contracted the worst flu you could ever imagine, but it just never got better, but you’re also expected to just get on with life. And that’s just like, a very one-dimensional view of the picture. So, cut your fellow chronically ill loved ones some slack. If you’re trying to help someone else in your life, with talking about their spiralling thoughts, The best and only tip I can think of, for helping someone else who’s going through this situation, is just to listen. Don’t try to talk them out of the feelings that they have: listen, don’t interrupt and be present with them. Trust me, there’s like no way you can take this pain away, but having you there for them – whether even through like a message, a
call, or hanging out with them in person – That support means everything. And that is all I want from the people in my life. And I [stumbles on words] yeah. I just needed to share that today. Uh, if you’ve made it to the end of this video, thank you for sticking around and for listening to me talk about really heavy stuff . What are your experiences with these feelings? Tell me in the comments below. If you liked this video, um I’d love to talk (more) about ways to combat these feelings. Sharing this caring and subscribing means that you become part of the family! So do those things, yay! You can find me or Kate on social media. We’re on Facebook, Twitter. Till next time, I’m Victoria, [ol’ timey american accent] you’re watching Chronicles and I’d like to invite you to join me in the fight for making invisible illness visible!

5 Do’s and Dont’s of Dealing with Other’s Mental Illness


We’ll be sharing five tips for helping someone with a mental illness based on an article from issue two of our magazine One of the biggest factors in whether those who are mentally ill will open up to a person about their feelings is How that person reacts. It can be frustrating when someone in our life is ill. And we don’t like seeing our loved ones in pain and often want to help. These five tips should help assure that your loved one and open up more to you. Tip number one: Don’t allow your negative emotions to be visible Like I said, it can be frustrating trying to help someone who’s ill. You might feel anger, pity, sadness or even hopelessness when trying to help. It’s best not to show these emotions Don’t sigh when your loved one responds in a way you don’t like, and don’t talk to them as if they are stupid. Keep in mind, if they could act healthy they would and if you show a negative reaction to your loved ones, they are much more likely to hide their feelings. On to tip two: do show them that you still care This one may seem obvious but often mental illness makes a person feel broken or somehow let down. Therefore your loved ones should be reminded that you care greatly about them without this reinsurance, they may feel as if no one cares. Tip three: and this one is an important one Don’t tell or remind them that it could be worse. This is extremely unhelpful The idea that knowing that some people are worse off will feel better is simply not true. In fact, it might make your loved one feel even worse Firstly, all that matters to your loved one right now is that they feel bad so bringing up others doesn’t really factor into how they feel. Secondly this reminder may cause guilt within your loved one. They may feel guilty for talking about the illness or even worse feel guilty for being ill at all. This means that your loved one is less likely to open up about their illness to you or to anyone else in the future. Tip 4: Don’t try to relate how they feel to your own experiences, that is unless you have the same illness of course. It can be tempting to try and relate how they feel two things you’ve been through but telling someone who has bipolar that you understand because you have mood swings Or your friend with anxiety that you understand because you get anxious before exams isn’t helpful. Mental illness is a more extreme than other behavior in feelings and it can often feel Invalidating to the person to hear these things. Also, doing this tends to focus the conversation back on you when it is the other person who needs support, so it’s best to listen rather than try to offer up your own stories. And finally, tip 5: do try and research their illness The Internet is a wonderful tool that allows you to research whatever illness your loved one has. You can research symptoms, helpful tips, and read others experiences. This all means that you can support your loved one in the best way possible. Something good to research is particular warning signs and how best to deal with them. Knowing for example, that someone’s first sign of anxiety Can be them feeling very hot is good for spotting when a possible anxiety attack is about to rear its head. That’s it for our tips. We hope that you now feel better equipped to help support someone with mental illness Remember it’s always good for someone with mental illness to seek medical attention and help. If you liked this video Please like, share, and subscribe also, if you’d like more from our magazines they are on sale at www.psych2go.shop You can also check out our patreon at patreon.com/psych2gomagazine