Does Utah culture have a stigma toward mental illness?


I still don’t understand why mental
illness has the degree of stigma associated to it that it does. we sense
the complexity of such matters when we hear professionals speak of neuroses and
psychoses, of genetic predispositions and chromosome defects, of bipolarity and
paranoia and schizophrenia. However bewildering this all may be,
these afflictions are some of the realities of mortal life. Mental illness is something that is still over the edge for most people. In Utah we have a predominant culture and religion and that culture and religion does a
fantastic job of someone who’s struggling, we embrace the opportunity to
help provide support and there’s a line of people there with casseroles. But if somebody is diagnosed a the mental illness, there’s an awkwardness, there’s
an uncertainty of how do we how do we interact with that and as a result nothing happens. As we experienced firsthand someone that
was very close to us being diagnosed with schizophrenia, that was a moment
that we really tried to really understand what do we do next how do we
become a part of helping as opposed to just responding to a bad situation. We have this tendency to feel like how did I negatively influence, how did I frankly
screw up someone I love dearly. It’s not about me. It’s about the person we love and once you get the me out of the equation then you can start really
focusing on getting that person you love the help and the treatment that they need. maybe these afflictions are some of the
realities of mortal life and there should be no more shame in acknowledging
them than acknowledging a battle with high blood pressure or the sudden
appearance of a malignant tumor.

How Can We Care for Those with Serious Mental Illness?


So it’s like it’s actually proximity, it’s actually being close to somebody. Two words, proximity and eversion. Bear with me for a second,
’cause there’s this idea of being close to people. You know that series that Brux just did, just before this one about John 9, there’s this guy who’s
blind and Jesus heals him. Okay, at the beginning of
the story, he’s an outcast. He’s got a disability, he’s poor, he’s the wrong age, too
young, he’s excluded. He’s on the margins of
society and of religion. He’s cast out from the temple. But by the end of the story, Jesus has turned that narrative around and now he’s the guy who can
see and the Pharisees can’t. It’s this massive miracle that happens, and actually that is, if you
can reframe so that eversion, the word eversion is the
opposite of inversion, that’s turning something upside down, eversion is turning something
from the inside out, and from the outside in, so now those people who
were in the margins, who were really far
away, those who are poor, those who are unwell,
those who are struggling, where all the humanity is, Jesus comes right into the midst of our really messy humanity. He’s born in a manger, he comes to dwell with all those places that we
want to kind of throw away. So you evert the circle, you
hang around with proximity, you bring people close who
are unwell who are struggling. You just hang out there, do
life with people, be present, and you’ll find that Jesus
will show up in that place because he dwells where the struggle is, where our humanity is.

Can Mental illness PHYSICALLY affect you? | Kati Morton

Can Mental illness PHYSICALLY affect you? | Kati Morton


Hey everyone. Happy Thursday. Now today I’m going to just answer a question. I was gonna do coffee and a chat, but it is later in the day and I don’t know if you are like me, but I can’t drink coffee that late, ’cause then I can’t sleep. It gives me the jitters. So today’s question is actually something that I’m surprised I haven’t talked about before, so we’re gonna talk about it. And the question is “Hey Kati. Can mental illness/illnesses physically affect you?” Good question. “I don’t mean behavior. I mean physical illness and pain. More specifically, I’ve been diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorder. I wake up almost every morning feeling physically ill. (sick heavy head)” -they say in parentheses- “but more than that, it’s really hard to compare it to any other feeling. I’m pretty sure it’s not an anxious stomach, but it’s only when I wake up, even when I’ve had a really good night sleep. I stay off of school because of it and it’s hard to explain it to my dad so I just refuse to go.” And the truth of it is that this is very very common. Yes, it is completely normal to physically feel what’s going on with us mentally. And I’m sure you’ve heard people talk about how powerful the human mind is, and how powerful it can be. I mean I can get anxious and make my stomach upset likefinger snapif I want to. So we know that it is linked, and those are actually called somatic symptoms. Not to be confused with somatic disorder and all of those different things, but somatic symptoms are the physical manifestation of mental illness, and that is very common. Some of the most common ones that people talk about are stomachaches, headaches, heavy heads kinda like what she talked about. Like a sick, heavy head. Those are very common, and that is why we usually end up, if we’ve never been diagnosed, we haven’t gotten treatment, a lot of people end up in their GP or regular doctor or primary care doctor’s office first. Because we don’t feel well. We think we’re sick, but we don’t have like green snot or other things that tell us we’re sick or a fever. But we just don’t feel well and it keeps going on and persisting so we go to our doctor and we say “What gives? Why do I feel so sick?” And then they usually refer us to a therapist, psychologist, psychiatrist, something like that. So if you are out there and you are feeling achy- That’s the most common symptom by the way that I’ve heard, is that people who are depressed or anxious have like body aches like ugh kinda like when you’re sick and you ache. We feel that way and so if you have any symptoms like that and you’ve maybe even gone to the doctor and they checked you out and they’re like “Nothing’s wrong but you can take these antibiotics if you want”. This is somethin to think about and consider, because our bodies work as a whole. Right? Healthy mind, healthy body. That is our motto. And that is because they’re so intrinsically linked. If one is off, the other’s off. If the other one’s off, the other one’s off. So you can see that if something is wrong in our brain If we are feeling really down and out, that body aches might be common. We might wanna sleep a lot. A lot of symptoms that we could think of and associate with illness. So get checked out by your doctor first because we all know it could be sickness, but if it’s been going on and you’ve gotten checked out and everything is fine. Ask them for a referral to see a therapist, psychiatrist, psychologist, someone, some mental health professional, so that you can get properly diagnosed and get the help that you want. And if you have not hopped over to the Shorty awards. I’m gonna put the link in the description. Mental health is finally being recognized, and we as a community are finally on the board! And so you can vote once a day, each day. Once a day until February 18th. And if you put it on your Twitter or Facebook, we get an extra point like another vote that counts twice. So exciting! So if you could share the link. Share it on your Twitter or Facebook. We could really rally the masses and mental health could get an award. That’s so exciting. I used to like beg and plead to try to get us involved in this stuff and I never heard from anybody. And now we’re on it so please vote if you haven’t. Link in the description. Also I wanna give a whole-hearted thank you to all of my patreon patrons. I usually put their names at the end of a Monday video but I had a collab this Monday so everything was off so thank you so much. Here are the people who give and if you are interested in helping the kinion community helping us reach more people and supporting this channel, I’ll put the link in the description for that as well. I love you all and I will see you on Monday. Bye! I think that’s about the only dance I know. Subtitles by the Amara.org community

How Can Apps Help People with Brain Injury?

How Can Apps Help People with Brain Injury?


Apps are really important for individuals
with traumatic brain injury and PTSD and other kinds of brain conditions. What I found is that they really allow individuals
to apply cognitive skills in a very practical functional way in a way other than often they
get in more traditional kids of therapies. When an individual has a brain injury they
have difficulty with organization and time management and memory and decision making. And one of the interesting things about apps
is that apps allow them to apply strategies to deal with some of those issues that they
might be facing on an everyday life. But the apps give them immediate feedback
that they can then use in order to sort of determine whether or not they’re on the
right track. Whereas if you’re using something like paper
and pencil it’s not so easy to see the results. The other thing about apps is that they’re
with them every day, all day long. And so they’re able to actually use the
applications throughout the day to ben them and to help them with some of the cognitive
struggles that they have.

🔴 RELAXING Ambient MUSIC for STRESS RELIEF, Study, Meditation, Sleep


RELAXING PIANO MUSIC, INSTRUMENTAL Music, Meditation + Soothing + Relaxing We often hear that music therapy, spiritual music, Shamanic music, meditation music, music to relax the body and mind, relaxing music, music to stop thinking, music to put the mind blank, music to sleep, RELAX MUSIC, music for studying, nature music, baby music, alpha waves, relaxing music, music for meditation, relaxing music, music to reduce stress, quiet music, relaxed music, healing music, piano music, celtic music, flute music, Tibetan bowls, Binaural Beats, Focus music, guitar music, background music, Baby Sleep Music, Stress and Anxiety Music, Relaxing Piano to Relieve Stress, can make people relieve work stress, reduce stress from life, avoid all kinds of chronic diseases, sleep better, concentrate more to study, etc. Benefits of mental music: It can relax the body and avoid chronic diseases caused by autonomic nervous tension. by Hindu music, African music, music that helps to enter a trance yoga. If you know the work of Yogacast, Hare Krishna, Michael Franti and Keshna, then, use this music also in the same way. In Zen and Reiki healing sessions it favors an easy entrance to the Zen state. Let the subtle, relaxing and calming sounds take you to a higher, higher state of consciousness. Get ready to receive the Reikis vibrations. Soft instrumental music facilitates the relaxation of the body after an arduous day of work and helps you enter a state of perfect tranquility. Spa music, nature sounds, soft piano sounds, musical instruments that are easy to listen to and appreciate favor to achieve a complete state of relaxation. The music you will find on the RELAX MUSIC channel is great for massage therapy, as it will help relax the body and mind. Music to study, music to memorize, music for concentration: The music of our channel is ideal to put in the background during the study. It helps you concentrate, pay attention, focus and work in a more effective way. Our study of music for concentration uses powerful alpha waves and Binaural Beats to increase concentration and brain power and is the ideal music to relax and relieve stress. This Study Music and Focus Music, is relaxing instrumental music that will help you study, concentrate and learn for that great test or exam and naturally allow your mind to reach a state of concentration, ideal for work and study. Relaxation music is perfect for Deepak Chopra meditations, Buddhist meditations, Zen meditation, conscious meditations and Eckhart Tolle meditation. This music carries elements of Japanese meditation music, East Indian music, Tibetan music, shamanic music. One of the benefits of listening to this music is the cleansing of the Chakra, as it helps to open the third eye and improve the transcendental ability of meditation. Music to sleep and Music to sleep babies:
Sleep music or sleep music is the perfect music to help you relax and go to sleep deeply, leaving your mind blank, and enjoy a deep sleep. Sleep music is the best music to relieve stress, reduce insomnia and promote sleep. Quiet sleep music uses delta waves and soft instrumental music to help achieve deep relaxation and sleep. Relaxing sleep music can be used as background, meditation, relaxation, calm and sleep music. Let our relaxing and soothing music help you enjoy a deep and relaxing sleep. Music to reduce anxiety, musical to stop thinking, music to blank your mind: Our music to reduce anxiety, facilitates the relaxation of the body after a long day of work and helps you enter a state of perfect tranquility. Spa music, nature sounds, soft piano sounds, musical instruments that are easy to hear and appreciate favor a complete state of relaxation. RELAX MUSIC music is great for massage therapy, and our music will help you relax your body and mind.

What is Illness Anxiety Disorder?

What is Illness Anxiety Disorder?


Hello, this is Dr. Grande. Today’s question is what is Illness Anxiety Disorder If you find this video to be interesting or helpful, please like it and subscribe to my channel. That way you won’t miss any new videos. Now when we talk about illness anxiety disorder, we talk about a mental disorder where an individual is preoccupied with concern about having a serious illness and this is an interesting disorder because it’s fairly similar to Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and there’s even a debate in a mental health community About whether or not Illness Anxiety disorder is really just a variant of OCD So when we look at the criteria for Illness Anxiety Disorder there’s another interesting feature a lot of mental disorders in the DSM have a symptom criteria section and Then other criteria so there may be Nine symptoms in the symptom criteria section and somebody might have to meet four or five of those symptoms to qualify For that criterion and then there are other criteria that have to qualify for as well With illness anxiety disorder all of the different criteria are required There is no section in the DSM with illness anxiety disorder That has a number of symptoms where somebody only has to meet a certain Number less than that for the diagnosis. For example if we consider Borderline Personality Disorder that disorder has nine symptoms in the symptom criteria But an individual only needs to have five of those to qualify for that diagnosis So again with Illness Anxiety Disorder, all the symptoms are required. So the first symptom is a preoccupation with having or acquiring a serious illness now the DSM doesn’t specifically say that this would be a mental disorder or a medical disorder but most of the time we interpret this as relating to a possible medical disorder a concern over having or getting a medical disorder because we usually conceptualize this first criterion as being related to medical disorders this brings up an important point in terms of the distinction between a talk therapist and a physician For example, I have a PhD in counselor education and supervision and I’m a licensed counselor I’m not a physician and most talk therapists are not physicians either. So with this particular diagnosis of illness anxiety disorder as a talk therapist you would be working with somebody who has complaints or concerns about a medical disorder. So it’s important to make the referral to a physician so that you know if they in fact have the disorder or don’t That’s an important element in terms of the mental health treatment to know if that medical disorder is really there or not. Now, of course a lot of times when we treat individuals with Illness Anxiety Disorder, they have been referred by a physician and we already have the information that shows that they did not qualify for a diagnosis of any type of medical disorder at least not the medical disorder that they’re worried about. The second criterion is that there are little or no somatic symptoms. So there’s another disorder which is difficult to differentiate from Illness Anxiety Disorder called Somatic Symptom Disorder and I have another video that discusses these two disorders together. With Illness Anxiety Disorder there can be mild somatic symptoms but that’s really not the emphasis as the symptom criterion suggests the anxiety is not coming primarily from physical sensations of the person’s having but rather the meaning or significance of having the illness that they’re worried about having. The third symptom criterion is the individual is experiencing a high level anxiety about health-related concerns. The fourth is that there’s excessive health-related behavior like checking or maladaptive avoidance, so a lot of times we think of this disorder and compare it to OCD, it’s this particular symptom criterion that makes it difficult to distinguish the two because that health-related behavior as I mentioned oftentimes involves checking and of course OCD oftentimes involves checking. The fifth symptom criteria is that the disturbance has been present for six months. but the illness that the person is worried about can change in that time. So a lot of times we think of Illness Anxiety Disorder, we think of one particular illness that the person is worried about having or acquiring. But sometimes with this disorder if they have evidence that shows that they don’t have a particular medical disorder they were worried about, Then they might develop a fear about another potential medical disorder. So the illness can change but the disturbance would be present for at least six months and The sixth symptom criterion is that this disturbance is not better explained by another mental disorder and there’s a number of mental disorders listed in the DSM as examples. One of them is OCD. Again, emphasizing this difficult differentiation between illness anxiety disorder and OCD It’s important to note here as well that somebody can have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Illness Anxiety Disorder at the same time These can be comorbid and oftentimes they are comorbid. This six symptom criterion that not better explained by another mental disorder criterion doesn’t mean that the two can’t co-occur. It just means that if you’re looking at a presentation that you think is Illness Anxiety Disorder and the symptoms are in fact better explained by OCD then you would consider OCD over illness anxiety disorder. This can certainly become confusing but the term not better explained doesn’t mean that the two are mutually exclusive, that the two disorders cannot co-occur. Now it’s also important to note that with illness anxiety disorder. There are two subtypes These are not specifiers but rather subtypes So an individual would have to have one and only one of these subtypes There’s the care-seeking type and the care-avoiding type. So an individual with Illness Anxiety Disorder would have to be categorized as one of these two types, they could not be assigned both types. Some other interesting associated characteristics with Illness Anxiety Disorder include that there’s usually not a desire for perfectionism with this disorder like we would see with OCD and also, in terms of what medical disorder or serious illness somebody’s worried about it’s oftentimes not a communicable illness so the concern would more likely be over a medical disorder like cancer or heart disease as opposed to influenza. Now in terms of the treatment for Illness Anxiety Disorder, we don’t have a lot of research on the treatment effectiveness for illness anxiety disorder specifically, but generally we believe that mental health talk therapy is somewhat effective in relieving the symptoms of Illness Anxiety Disorder. I hope you found this description of Illness Anxiety Disorder to be interesting. Thanks for watching.

A young person’s experience of living with a mental illness – Wagga Wagga

A young person’s experience of living with a mental illness – Wagga Wagga


I was diagnosed with bipolar disorder back in 2010 after I finished the year 12 HSC and so now I’ve been I guess recovering with bipolar disorder for the past five years living with the bipolar disorder as a young person is at times very challenging most people when they’re between the ages of 18 to 22 are out partying and a very carefree they don’t have to think about all of these other things so for me going out and wanting to drink with friends I have to think of a lot of other different various things and at times it makes me think that I guess I used to be the one that was the the life of the party and at times now I have to think gee I must be the boring one so it can be very isolating and can mean that your friendship circles reduce dramatically and at the moment I’m currently trying to understand how I’m supposed to get through that because I guess the word to really describe how it is is isolating at times I definitely think that the mental health system living in Wagga is very uneven I guess it was comments from my psychiatrist in April this year when I said to him you know I’m, I’m wanting to have this you know huge Empire for business and he said to me Sam I hope that you’re getting ready I said you wouldn’t what should I be getting ready for and he said that when you’re about 40 your cognitive function is going to decline your memory is going to decline when I asked him what can I be doing he said nothing I think that that type of mentality within the mental health system isn’t helpful I think the proper the approach that needs to be taken needs to be one that’s very flexible to each person that’s living with that mental illness I think that what needs to be considered is that everybody is going to have a different experience or lived experience of living with bipolar disorder and I believe that mental health specialists need to not be closed mind in their approach as they speak to each of those individuals one of the main things I’ve seen or have learnt from other people that have been diagnosis they often go to their GP and their GP will write a script however that scripts never followed up and I guess their cause is often lost I would really like to see some more rules or regulations around GPS in their involvement with psychiatric illnesses as well as more support groups for the use so that they can come to that space where they can voice how they’re feeling and then get support for that I wouldv’e thought in today’s modern society that we would be taking a more holistic approach to mental illness one that’s not only with medication but where you can come to have help from a dietitian sport and actually creating this routine because for me that’s the absolute reason why I’m currently managing my bipolar disorder you

Medication and mental illness


>>Jen Aboki: I’ve had a very tattered relationship
with medication. It’s not my favourite part of the journey. Often when you’re in the acute
setting in the hospital, which is where I was, they don’t really talk about other aspects
like ‘how are you going today?’ It’s like ‘here’s your medication, take it’. Medication
for me really represents from people are certainty that if you take this, you’ll be well. And
I don’t believe that that’s all you need to do to stay well.
>>Pat Beinke: I had to do what was told otherwise I would be put back in hospital. I was in
jail within my own body anyway but then I was also in jail with what they were telling
me. So I was outside but still not free. I really wasn’t in the right headspace to remember
too much of it because you’re a little bit like a zombie, I suppose you could call it.
>>Kerin O’Halloran: No-one wants to see their child diminished you know. She was a very
smart person. She was very clever. She had tremendous political wit. I mean you should
have seen her political cartoons [laughs]. They were really a joy. And then you see them
being diminished, bit by bit, because of a medication.
>>Dr Roderick McKay: The first key issue is medication should very rarely be the first
line option. Definitely for mild to moderate mental illness, first line option should be
looking at your lifestyle, things you’re doing, not doing. It also means looking at what sorts
of talking therapy you might be comfortable with. Clearly sometimes some people are not
comfortable with talking therapy. That’s legitimate as well.
>>Dr Michael Tam: The evidence would suggest that psychological therapies, interpersonal
therapies, more psychodynamic based supportive therapies, those sort of approaches I think
are really first line. People with the more severe end, severe spectrum of illness, using
pharmacotherapy – you would consider it earlier.>>Dr Roderick McKay: There’s never one right
medication. It’s always the right medication, for the person, for a purpose. What’s best
for a person is very much dependent on that person and their desires as well as the illness
they’ve got.>>Jen Aboki: To me medication represents the
whole clinical process of psychiatry, of hospitalisation, of the whole process that kind of ties in
with that. Taking medication every day means to me that you need to rely on something to
be well. And so what if that thing wasn’t there? Does that mean you can’t rely on yourself
to be well? The impact of knowing you need to take something forever or indefinitely
is really scary.>>Kerin O’Halloran: She became very toxic
often on medication. So we live with a lot of very severe side effects. She had quite
significant weight gain, she had breast milk, she looked six months pregnant, menstruation
had stopped. So there was all those very severe hormonal impacts.
>>Pat Beinke: I suppose it held me down a bit, it felt like to me, because I had to
do the monthly blood test, I had to make sure I was available to do that. It also makes
you tired. The weight issues and also heart problems. I’ve had a heart attack and I’ve
got tachycardia so they really have to monitor that.
>>Judith Mackson: So if you try to see it from a consumer’s point of view, when adverse
events occur, that they’re actually able to be appropriately managed, and being responsive
enough to see when things change. You need to step in and play a role.
>>Dr Roderick McKay: Medication for mental illness is the same as medication for any
other illness. There’s side effects as well as benefits. And so it’s being able to have
that conversation up front about the fact there are risks as well as benefits and discussing
with the person which risks they’re prepared to take.
>>Dr Michael Tam: Trying to make sure my patients feel comfortable having those discussions
with me is a very important part of making sure the right person gets the right medication
for the right length of time. It’s not just about mental illness, it’s also about the
whole person care.>>Dr Roderick McKay: Unless each person that’s
prescribing is actually aware of the range of problems a person has, be they physical
health problems, social problems, mental health problems, and the medications they’re on,
then things are likely to go wrong. In terms of how do collaborative roles work best, the
key thing is having clear communication and agreeing what the roles are. Because there’s
many ways of working best, but none of them work well unless you communicate.
>>Dr Michael Tam: I think at the moment unfortunately it does tend to be fairly fragmented. One
of the themes that tends to come out is that they have to repeat their story time and time
again to individuals and that becomes a very tiring process. It can be a very re-traumatising
process.>>Kerin O’Halloran: There was all this lack
of continuity. You never knew who to speak to. Just not working in a team.
>>Judith Mackson: I think one of the things that needs to be in place to enable a consumer
to get best possible care is the complete medication regime is known to your providers.
And also the goals of therapy, that the intention of the treatment plan is actually communicated.
>>Jen Aboki: They are very reluctant when I’ve told them in the past I want to get off
medication. I ended up bringing my husband along to an appointment and I said the same
thing to them and then they changed their tune. They said, ‘ok well if your partner’s
here to support you, ok we’ll look at reducing the medication’. I was upset that it took
that. Not everyone knows that they have a voice or a choice.
>>Pat Beinke: I liked going to see the psychiatrist. She actually showed empathy, she would remember
everything. She would obviously make her notes after the appointment. I suppose when you’re
schizophrenic and they’re writing in front of you, it doesn’t really help. I didn’t mind
just opening up and talking to her which made me feel comfortable just to talk and not hide
anything from her.>>Kerin O’Halloran: When it’s a team and everyone’s
equal, there’s kind of this open dialogue. To treat her with respect and give her a very
clear role in the decision making that is incredibly helpful.
>>Dr Michael Tam: Almost all the actual care is provided by the consumer themselves and
they’re carers. What we’re really doing in the longer term is empowering consumers and
the carers so that they can recover.>>Jen Aboki: I can look back and go it’s come
in handy when I have been unwell because it has gotten me well a lot sooner I guess than
if there wasn’t any medication available.>>Pat Beinke: Medication was a big part for
me obviously. It did help me. But, there is no one solution I don’t think for every single
person with mental illness. She actually wanted to help me get off the medication which was
brilliant. So I’m like, let’s give it a shot. It took three years. It’s been nearly a year
now, no meds.>>Jen Aboki: We need to be treated as equals.
The consumer has the lived knowledge and the lived experience and those are equally as
important.

Being Trans is No Longer a Mental Illness?!

Being Trans is No Longer a Mental Illness?!


Hey! My name’s Grayson, and welcome to my channel. So– Oh, that was a weird noise. Did you hear that? That was strange. Um, so the World Health Organization has declassified
being trans as a mental illness. This has gotten a lot of mixed reactions from
what I gather. Most of it is positive, but I thought I would
present, I guess, both uh… Both sides, so to speak, of the issue and
then give my opinion on it. So, let’s start with the backlash a little
bit, or the concerns, with this. From what I’ve heard, a lot of the concern
comes from insurance coverage. People are worried, now that it’s no longer
considered a mental health issue, that it’s not going to warrant insurance covering things
like gender-affirming surgeries or hormone replacement therapy. I can understand where they’re coming from
with that. It is a concern. We need access to those kinds of things. But the reality is that this is remaining
a diagnosis. It’s just not in the same category. So, the International Classification of Diseases,
the ICD– The new version is the ICD 11. In the previous version, the ICD 10, it was
listed under mental health. It was considered a mental health disorder. That wasn’t really a great thing because you
had maybe transphobic people who would say, “It’s not a real thing. It’s an illness, a disease.” Uh, but in the newer version, the ICD 11,
it’s listed under sexual health, and so it’s now called Gender Incongruence. And all it means is your gender identity doesn’t
match the sex you were assigned at birth. But again, some people are worried that this
is a move towards demedicalizing, and there are people in this community who think that
being trans is a medical condition, it is a mental health issue. And, kind of separate from that, the one other
concern I’ve heard is that it moves to the sexual health category. Some people are concerned that that would
reduce teen’s and youth access to things like either therapy or, um, medical treatment because
sexual– sexuality in general– is very much stigmatized for younger people. I think that concern is definitely warranted
to some degree because it’s true. Sex ed, anything to do with sex, is very taboo
for younger people, at least in this culture. So, that’s kind of the concern from some people,
is that it’s demedicalizing it. Some say it’s ignoring the fact– the mental
health aspect of being trans as well. You know, dysphoria and such. And then on the other hand, there’s also a
lot of celebration because this is a big deal, you know. To not have being trans considered a mental
illness anymore is a huge deal because it reduces a ton of stigma behind people thinking
that we are delusional or crazy for– for, you know, “thinking” we’re this way. It reduces a lot of that, and it stops people
from being able to say that because it’s no longer classified that way. And because this is an international thing,
I think that that could help more conservative countries to– to kind of move past uh…
some of their older ways of thinking. There’s also some celebration because it’s
still a diagnosis. It’s still medicalized enough to the point
where we can have access to medical care. And personally, I think this is a good thing. I don’t think that this is going to have many
negative impacts, as long as we have access to care, which I think is still gonna be the
case. There’s no signs that it won’t be. It is gonna reduce stigma. It’s giving our community some ammunition
to– to kind of fight back with as far as, “No, this is real. This is not just some delusion or some mental
illness.” Yes, dysphoria is still very much um… a
mental health issue, I think. It affects your ability to– to kind of function
day-to-day, and it’s very difficult to deal with. Do I think that’s still kind of a mental health
issue? Sure. You know, as far as… There’s a difference between dysphoria and
being trans. Um, and so dysphoria is, in my mind, still
a mental health issue because it interferes with, you know, your daily functioning. It’s distressing. It, you know, it’s persistent as well. It makes sense that this would be a mental
illness and just being trans, just having a gender identity that doesn’t match the sex
you were assigned at birth– That’s just a variation in human beings. Like it’s not– It’s not inherently an issue,
I guess. It’s the dysphoria that’s the problem. So, yeah. I think this is a good thing, and I also like
that it’s listed under sexual health, rather than mental health, because that’s saying
that our brains are not the issue here. That’s saying more that the way our bodies
developed, or anatomical sex, I guess– It’s saying that that’s more of the issue than
our brain, and I like that. And in the end, honestly, I doubt this is
going to have huge impacts um… onhow trans people are cared for, at least medically-wise,
because the DSM, which is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, which is put out by the
APA, the American Psychological Association– That’s still really what we use, at least
here in the US, as far as diagnosis and treatment goes. The DSM-V still has the diagnosis of Gender
Dysphoria, which is what all insurance coverage is really based off of. So, this new change might change stigma, um,
in the US, which is great. I think that’s amazing. Uh, but I don’t think, at least right now,
it’s really gonna change much as far as care. Um, I’m gonna link here the video that the
World Health Organization put out regarding this change. In it, they explain, you know, why they did
it, and what it really means, and what changes were made. So, check that out. I watched it, and it really helped to kind
of explain this because from what I’ve seen, there isn’t a ton of really clear information
right now on that sort of thing, so I figured go right to the source of where it came from. You’ll be better off. That’s this video. Thank you for watching! My name is Grayson. Have a wonderful day.