Tell Me a Story: Parents Find Answers for Son’s Brachial Plexus Injury

Tell Me a Story: Parents Find Answers for Son’s Brachial Plexus Injury


“Hi I’m Suzie Tieber, I’m Chase Tieber’s mom.” “Hi I’m Steve Tieber, I’m Chase Tieber’s father.” “Chase has Erb’s palsy. Its the result of a Brachial Plexus injury.” “When Chase was born his shoulders were
stuck” “in the birth canal, and the doctor
had to” “pull Chase out as quick as possible
because his air was also cut off.” “The whole process took 45 seconds, and
I” “still remember this day. I still remember the doctors saying” “his shoulders were stuck. When we realized
how severe his injury was,” “I mean, his arm didn’t move, it didn’t function,
and that’s why we sent him to Children’s” “because we found out they had a Brachial Plexus clinic, one of only a few” “hospitals in the country that actually
had a clinic specializing in this injury. “Having an has been thinking
about, you know, wanting to get him a son and” “give him,” “you know, someone maybe he could throw around a football with. I mean that,” “I think, was the first thing I was thinking. You know, oh my gosh what kind of” “relationship, like what can they do together? You know,” “in my mind he was just never gonna have
an arm that worked. he had surgery when he” “was four months old.” “They took and grafted his sural nerves from his legs, then they” “implanted those nerves into his neck,” “and then it was basically a wait and see” “for almost a year until the nerves would
have time to” “regenerate into repair and for the signal to travel from his neck” “to his arm.” “You know, it’s funny.
Immediately” “you find out that your child has an
injury you go from” “the parent, the woe-is-me factor, oh my god,” “you know, what am I gonna go through with
my child? My child’s not going to be normal.” “My child is not going to be” “the same as other kids. All about a
million things got your head about, you” “know, how cruel kids can be,” “and how he’s going to be different. You
want you child to be as normal as possible,” “to fit in as best as possible. And we went through that” “probably right up until our first time
walking into Children’s. The moment we walked into” “Children’s we were here for about 15 minutes,” “and you take a quick look around and you realize how fortunate you are” “because things could be worse.” “It could be so much worse. What we’ve learned” “is never take anything for granted with
your children.” “Seek out the answers. You have to be an
educated parent,” “you have to learn quickly to answer the
questions, and you have to seek out the best” “medical treatment for your child.” I can tell you without question that Chase is going to live a normal life and he’ll be able to do” “whatever he wants with his arms.”

Brachial Plexus Injury Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo

Brachial Plexus Injury Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody, it’s Doctor Jo. And today I’m
gonna show you some stretches and exercises for a brachial plexus injury. So let’s get
started. Sometimes, a brachial plexus injury is called a burner or a stinger. You see it
a lot in football players. And what basically happens is they over stretch their neck, and
that brachial plexus that brings all those nerves out to the arm gets overstretched and
then it’s really painful those nerves are all flared up and it can cause a lot of problems.
So the first set of exercises are gonna be those isometric exercises where you’re not
actually moving your head or your neck, but you’re activating those muscles to get them
stronger. So the first one, you’re just gonna place your hand on the side of your head.
And the motion that you’re doing is this, but your hand’s gonna stop your head from
actually moving. So you’re just gonna kind of push into your hand for about 3-5 seconds,
and then relax. Now don’t push hard, don’t feel like you have to crank it into your hand,
just start off with a light push. Hold it for 3-5 seconds. And then relax. Do about
5 of those and then switch sides. So same thing on the other side, just kind of pushing
in to the hand, but you’re not really moving your head or neck a whole lot. Then place
your palm on your forehead and you’re gonna do this motion, but your hand’s stopping it.
So again, 3-5 seconds kind of pushing in, holding it and then relaxing. Next one is
behind your head. So I like to just hold the back of my head, you don’t have to do your
palm or anything. And then just push backwards. So it would be this motion pushing into your
hand. So holding it, again 3-5 seconds, relax and do about 5 of those. So now, just lying
down on your back with your feet propped up. We call this hook-lying. Just bring your chin
towards your chest. So just coming up like this and then slowly coming back down. So
not going fast, going nice and controlled and just getting that motion in the neck area.
Coming up and slowly coming back down. So do about 10 of these and then work your way
up to about 20 of them. Then you’re gonna lie down on your side and put your arm kind
of up in front of you so you can rest your head here. And then just bring it up to the
side. Now still try and keep your ear up towards the ceiling, sometimes people kind of turn
their head and come up, but try and keep your eyes facing forward and your ear facing up
towards the ceiling. And then come up and slowly come back down. So again, not fast,
control that movement and then coming back down. So do about 10 on one side, switch and
do ten on the other side. So then you’re gonna come up into the quadruped position on all
fours. So this time, try and keep your head straight forward, eyes looking down, and then
look straight up ahead in front of you and then come back down. So looking up, getting
that stretch, and slowly coming back down. Again starting off with just 10, you don’t
want to over irritate those muscles in the brachial plexus and then coming back down.
And then work your way up from there. And then the last stretch/exercise is just shoulder
shrugs. So you’re just gonna come up and slowly come back down. So bringing those shoulder
straight up, not hunching your ears down, but bringing then straight up and then come
back down. So again, just about 10 – 15 of those to start off with. There you have it.
Those were your stretches and exercises for a brachial plexus injury, or a stinger or
burner. If you have any questions, leave them in the comments section. If you’d like to
check out some other videos, go to AskDoctorJo.com Don’t forget to like us, and remember. Be
safe, have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

Brachial Plexus Injury Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody, it’s Doctor Jo. And today I’m
gonna show you some stretches and exercises for a brachial plexus injury. So let’s get
started. Sometimes, a brachial plexus injury is called a burner or a stinger. You see it
a lot in football players. And what basically happens is they over stretch their neck, and
that brachial plexus that brings all those nerves out to the arm gets overstretched and
then it’s really painful those nerves are all flared up and it can cause a lot of problems.
So the first set of exercises are gonna be those isometric exercises where you’re not
actually moving your head or your neck, but you’re activating those muscles to get them
stronger. So the first one, you’re just gonna place your hand on the side of your head.
And the motion that you’re doing is this, but your hand’s gonna stop your head from
actually moving. So you’re just gonna kind of push into your hand for about 3-5 seconds,
and then relax. Now don’t push hard, don’t feel like you have to crank it into your hand,
just start off with a light push. Hold it for 3-5 seconds. And then relax. Do about
5 of those and then switch sides. So same thing on the other side, just kind of pushing
in to the hand, but you’re not really moving your head or neck a whole lot. Then place
your palm on your forehead and you’re gonna do this motion, but your hand’s stopping it.
So again, 3-5 seconds kind of pushing in, holding it and then relaxing. Next one is
behind your head. So I like to just hold the back of my head, you don’t have to do your
palm or anything. And then just push backwards. So it would be this motion pushing into your
hand. So holding it, again 3-5 seconds, relax and do about 5 of those. So now, just lying
down on your back with your feet propped up. We call this hook-lying. Just bring your chin
towards your chest. So just coming up like this and then slowly coming back down. So
not going fast, going nice and controlled and just getting that motion in the neck area.
Coming up and slowly coming back down. So do about 10 of these and then work your way
up to about 20 of them. Then you’re gonna lie down on your side and put your arm kind
of up in front of you so you can rest your head here. And then just bring it up to the
side. Now still try and keep your ear up towards the ceiling, sometimes people kind of turn
their head and come up, but try and keep your eyes facing forward and your ear facing up
towards the ceiling. And then come up and slowly come back down. So again, not fast,
control that movement and then coming back down. So do about 10 on one side, switch and
do ten on the other side. So then you’re gonna come up into the quadruped position on all
fours. So this time, try and keep your head straight forward, eyes looking down, and then
look straight up ahead in front of you and then come back down. So looking up, getting
that stretch, and slowly coming back down. Again starting off with just 10, you don’t
want to over irritate those muscles in the brachial plexus and then coming back down.
And then work your way up from there. And then the last stretch/exercise is just shoulder
shrugs. So you’re just gonna come up and slowly come back down. So bringing those shoulder
straight up, not hunching your ears down, but bringing then straight up and then come
back down. So again, just about 10 – 15 of those to start off with. There you have it.
Those were your stretches and exercises for a brachial plexus injury, or a stinger or
burner. If you have any questions, leave them in the comments section. If you’d like to
check out some other videos, go to AskDoctorJo.com Don’t forget to like us, and remember. Be
safe, have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.

Brachial Plexus Injury: Range of Motion Exercises

Brachial Plexus Injury: Range of Motion Exercises


Starting with shoulder flexion, you want to
hold at the wrist and the upper arm, kind of supporting that backbone in place, and you want to stretch it all the way up and all the way down. All the way up to the ear, and all the way
down. And then out to the side the same way, into shoulder abduction, holding that backbone in place. And stretching into shoulder abduction, and then shoulder external rotation — –is the big, big one we want to do every single time we get our diaper changed. So this is the one that most easily becomes tight as babies move and grow. Then we want to move to elbow flexion, which is rotating that forearm so the palm is up and then stretching it up…and down. All
the way straight. Up, and all the way straight. And then the wrist is up and down. Up being the most important, and then we want to open up that hand and the thumb and all those fingers, and stretch way high with the wrist extended at the same time. And you’re not going to do anything that’s going to cause additional harm to your child with stretching or with movement. Treat him or her just like any other little one.