Tell Me a Story: Parents Find Answers for Son’s Brachial Plexus Injury

Tell Me a Story: Parents Find Answers for Son’s Brachial Plexus Injury


“Hi I’m Suzie Tieber, I’m Chase Tieber’s mom.” “Hi I’m Steve Tieber, I’m Chase Tieber’s father.” “Chase has Erb’s palsy. Its the result of a Brachial Plexus injury.” “When Chase was born his shoulders were
stuck” “in the birth canal, and the doctor
had to” “pull Chase out as quick as possible
because his air was also cut off.” “The whole process took 45 seconds, and
I” “still remember this day. I still remember the doctors saying” “his shoulders were stuck. When we realized
how severe his injury was,” “I mean, his arm didn’t move, it didn’t function,
and that’s why we sent him to Children’s” “because we found out they had a Brachial Plexus clinic, one of only a few” “hospitals in the country that actually
had a clinic specializing in this injury. “Having an has been thinking
about, you know, wanting to get him a son and” “give him,” “you know, someone maybe he could throw around a football with. I mean that,” “I think, was the first thing I was thinking. You know, oh my gosh what kind of” “relationship, like what can they do together? You know,” “in my mind he was just never gonna have
an arm that worked. he had surgery when he” “was four months old.” “They took and grafted his sural nerves from his legs, then they” “implanted those nerves into his neck,” “and then it was basically a wait and see” “for almost a year until the nerves would
have time to” “regenerate into repair and for the signal to travel from his neck” “to his arm.” “You know, it’s funny.
Immediately” “you find out that your child has an
injury you go from” “the parent, the woe-is-me factor, oh my god,” “you know, what am I gonna go through with
my child? My child’s not going to be normal.” “My child is not going to be” “the same as other kids. All about a
million things got your head about, you” “know, how cruel kids can be,” “and how he’s going to be different. You
want you child to be as normal as possible,” “to fit in as best as possible. And we went through that” “probably right up until our first time
walking into Children’s. The moment we walked into” “Children’s we were here for about 15 minutes,” “and you take a quick look around and you realize how fortunate you are” “because things could be worse.” “It could be so much worse. What we’ve learned” “is never take anything for granted with
your children.” “Seek out the answers. You have to be an
educated parent,” “you have to learn quickly to answer the
questions, and you have to seek out the best” “medical treatment for your child.” I can tell you without question that Chase is going to live a normal life and he’ll be able to do” “whatever he wants with his arms.”

What OT Can Do For You: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

What OT Can Do For You: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)


You ready? 1, 2, pull up. I see
Scott engaged more, I see him lift his head up, I see him attend to things. Give me one more hit with the soccer ball. Thank you, that’s awesome. All right, let’s
try ultimate problem-solving profession,
because every day I have a chance to engage with somebody like Scott and I’m
going to figure out how to break through. I can use things that are really
familiar to him. He’s a race car driver, so I can use the steering wheel. If it’s
something that he knows about, he’s going to be like, oh yeah, that’s mine, I know what that is. Every idea that she’s had I’ve never even thought of. Just like we were
practicing over on the mat, we’re going to practice on keeping your head up. We’re
going to practice sitting up on your own. You got it? Nice. He didn’t move, he
wouldn’t do anything, and we’ve only been here three weeks and I would have never
thought we would have made it this far. It’s going great, he’s doing good. You got
it.