Do you have shoulder pain and want relief?

Do you have shoulder pain and want relief?


raise your hand if you’re watching this
video oh you can’t raise your hand because
your shoulder hurts ? that’s why you’re watching this video hi I’m Steve Rapposelli and I’m here to tell you about a wonderful offer we have and that is that
we have been seen shoulder pain patients for almost 30 years and we’ve learned a
thing or two over those 30 years and we would like to share some of our wisdom
with you if you have shoulder pain so does your shoulder wake you up at night?
can you not find a comfortable position? do you have trouble putting on your seat
belt ? do you dread paying the tolls? not because you’re paying money but because
your shoulder hurts! do you have trouble fixing your hair ? fastening your bra?
putting on shoes ? picking up lifting of a container of milk in the
refrigerator ? if you answer yes to any of these questions you know what I’m
talking about and you need help everybody thinks that that shoulder pain
is gonna go away next week ! next thing you know it’s six months .so if that
sounds like you then you really owe it to yourself to download our free
shoulder pain tip sheet so you can learn how to try to fix your own problem . now
that doesn’t work for everybody some people need professional help you
need professional help well guess what we’re the professionals we’ve been doing
this like I said for 30 years who have been voted best of delaware multiple years!
this is what we do we fix shoulder pain and i’m gonna tell you another secret i
would love to put those orthopedic surgeons out of business that’s right
that means that by treating shoulder pain successfully we keep people away
from the old surgeon’s knife and that makes me really happy so number one i
want you to download down below just click the button enter your information
get your free shoulder tips or if you want to move to the head to the front of
the line you can call us and schedule time to see one of our doctors of
physical therapy who treats shoulder pain every day so we really know what
we’re talking about we’re going to treat you like a VIP
we’re going to treat you like family that we really like not the family that
we don’t like and we look forward to seeing you soon so download the
information and give us a call

Back Pain Relief (1 of 2) – Immediate Fixes


Hey guys welcome to the channel! Today
we’re going to talk about some things that do to alleviate my back pain. These
will be more immediate things that I do when I have back pain now. This
is going to be the first of a two-part series. In the second part of this series,
I’ll go over some things that I do to prevent back pain, but first a disclaimer. The opinions or information in this video should not be taken as advice in any form, medical, financial, legal, or anything else. Please pause the video now to read the rest of the disclaimer or read it in the show notes. I came up with this list over 15 to 20 years through trial and error. We’ll start with number 10 and count our way down to number 1. Number 10 is the Spineworx. This is an
item that I got off Amazon.com. I’ll have a link to it in the show notes, but
basically it is kind of a rigid piece of plastic thing and you lay on it. It is
supposed to align your spine. I did get some relief out of this thing. I have
been told that I have reverse curvature of the spine, and to be quite honest when I first lay on this thing it’s kind of painful and doesn’t feel very good. But,
after I lay on it for a little while, that starts to feel better, and I think
it does provide some help for me. Number 9 is an ice pack — not too long though. I only use one for ten to 15 minutes at a time and if my skin starts to feel numb in that area I will remove it immediately. I was a little skeptical
about this one, but it actually works better than I thought. It seems to have the effect of taking an ibuprofen or something similar. It’s a non-drug way to get some relief from inflammation. All ice packs aren’t created equal though.
This blue one that I’ll have a link to in the show notes is a lot better than just putting it in a plastic bag. It seems to sweat a lot less, and it’s a lot more comfortable. They’re dirt cheap too they are a pretty cheap and effective solution. Number 8, stretching, especially if my hamstrings are tight from working out too much from running or biking. I’ve got two simple stretches that I’ll do. For the first one, I just sit in the floor and try to touch my toes basically a lot of times I’m so tight I can’t even get close to touching my toes and I’ll just grab my leg or and try to pull forward as much as I can. I’ll hold these stretches for, you know, 20 seconds, maybe up to a minute, and over time I’ll get a little bit more
limber even during that stretching session. The other stretch I do is the
ballerina stretch. It’s where I hike my leg up on a bar, sometimes a windowsill,
just something a little over a hip height, and I’ll lean forward and when I
do these stretches it seems to loosen my back up. Number 7, a high density foam
roller, similar to the one I’ve got pictured here on the slide. I got this at Amazon.com. I’ll have a link to one of these in the show notes. I keep a smaller one of these
at work too which is very handy. I have an office that I can actually roll on it
sometimes if I’ve having some back pain at work but at home I’ve got the bigger
version it’s about 1 yard wide it’s probably 6 to 8 inches in diameter and
it’s pretty dense and it actually kind of hurts a little bit when you’re
rolling on it but there’s various different ways you can roll on it I
mainly just roll on it lengthwise sometimes all the way from my feet to my
head sometimes and it will loosen you up quite a bit I was quite pleased with how
well this works this thing works super good in my opinion it’s probably
one of the most bang for the buck stings that I have in my arsenal to treat my
back pain and it’s predict an or 20 bucks so I wish I’d found out about
these years ago number 6 magnesium as a muscle relaxer and non-steroidal
anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs those would be like ibuprofen naproxen those
sort of things of course before making any changes to
any of your supplement or medications please check with your doctor or
pharmacist or healthcare provider as far as the magnesium goes I take one capsule
nightly sort of as a preventative measure just to kind of keep my back
loose at night and that seems to work pretty well for me when I wasn’t taking
one nightly I would take one when I was having a back spasm and that seemed to
help other people I know use magnesium oil and will rub it in they get some
relief from that they’ve told me other people will use epsom salts and a bath
and soak in it and that seems to work well for them as far as the insects go
my preferred NSAID is naproxen i’ll usually just take one I think it’s a 220
milligram tablet I’ll take once or twice a day 12 hours apart and
I’ll just take that first little time as I possibly can
doing this seems to help get the inflammation down which provides me with
some immediate relief number five bio freeze spray this was
first recommended to me by my chiropractor
I bought it his office but I’ve since found it on Amazon and Walmart and I’ll
have a link in the show notes it has menthol in it so there is a bit
of a smell however I find that the spray evaporates pretty nicely and it doesn’t
get all over everything too bad I will wear a t-shirt or
something often to kind of shield that menthol from other things I don’t want
to contaminate but this stuff’s pretty awesome
number four warm water I start out my morning by taking a warm shower and of
course that just helps get me going but I also use it if I have acute back pain
I’ll jump in the shower or a tub or a hot tub and just soak for a bit
obviously not too long I used some precautions here but the warm water just
fine just loosens me up quite a bit number three movement movement in
general really helps out my back road biking really helped it out just that
movement from the pedaling walking about 400 meters even when I really don’t feel
like it which is basically every morning really helps to loosen it up also I’ll
do some exercises called cat and camel I’ll do about 10 of those quickly just
jumping on the floor and do those real quick google it and you’ll find some
really good examples on those number two a great chiropractor they are not all
equal let me tell you I have been to a few that have been awesome though and
I’ve really been able to help me out especially in the short term they didn’t
fix it for the long term but they definitely helped me over the short term
I like to steer clear the ones that want to put you on some sort of a payment
plan I’ll mention physical therapy here as well
I know that’s a lot different than chiropractors but I have seen a lot of
people get good results from them just not me personally because I haven’t
tried them but they do seem to provide a lot of help to a lot of people from what
I have seen and heard and finally number one
Bowen therapy also known as the bowing technique bowen therapy helped fix the
reverse curvature of my spine and other therapies never did you can google that
I didn’t get an official diagnosis but I had several chiropractors tell me that I
had it over the years they could never fix it locally it cost about $60 per
session and I saw a massive results after just three sessions those
three sessions made me feel so good and I went back and had several more just to
see what else they could fix it had long-lasting effects for months maybe
even years I haven’t been back probably in a year or two and I still feel better
from it it’s just phenomenal it’s kind of a weird technique so I’ll tell you to
go ahead and just google it right now it’s bizarre but it’s the best thing
I’ve ever found thank you so much for joining me today for the video if you
liked it please hit the thumbs up button and subscribe and also look for the link
for the second part in the video where I will explain some things that I do to
prevent back pain in the first place until next time we’ll see you

If You Have a Metatarsal Stress Fracture… WATCH THIS

If You Have a Metatarsal Stress Fracture… WATCH THIS


In this video, I’m going to show you some
great exercises to get your body ready to run again after a Metatarsal stress fracture. So you’ve been told that the foot pain you’re
suffering with is a metatarsal stress fracture. This is one of those injuries that I can unfortunately
speak about from personal experience. I can definitely confirm that this isn’t an injury
you can run through! As you’ve no-doubt been told, resting the
foot is hugely important to allow the the bone tissue to heal properly. However it’s important to remember that
while you’re resting the foot, there’s still loads you can do in terms of exercise. With the right rehab plan we can make sure
that when the time comes, you’re ready to get back to running stronger than ever. After all… it’s the foot we’re trying
to rest. As long as we’re careful to protect the foot there’s still the other 95% of
the body that we can work on! I’ve actually created a free downloadable
Metatarsal Stress Fracture rehab guide to go alongside this video with a series of bonus
exercises and rehab progressions. I’ll leave the link in the description of this video
– be sure to check it out Now, let’s take a look at the various different
phases of metatarsal stress fracture rehab and check-out a few of the key exercises you
can be working on at each stage… Ok so during this early stage of your injury,
we of course have to protect the foot from undue loading and stress while the bone begins
to heal. Whether you’re in a protective boot or not,
the this period of time where you’re not using the foot normally can have consequences for
areas higher up the body, such as the hips and the low back. While you can’t load the foot too much at
this point, you can still promote good movement throughout the rest of your body. Here are a couple of hip and back mobility
exercises you can work on without damaging your foot. Start on all fours. From there, take one knee
and bring it forwards towards your elbow. From there bring the knee out to the side
and straighten the leg backward from the hip. Repeat this circular movement ten times, then
reverse the movement. Aim for three sets of ten on each side. Laying on your front, reach your left foot
and leg back and across your body to touch the ground on the right of your body. You’ll feel your glutes and low back working
as you extend the hip through movement. You’ll also be getting a great stretch through the
front of the hip. Repeat this on your right and left alternately,
and aim for three sets of 10. In the same way, while you’re not using the
foot normally, sometimes the ankle and foot it self can get a little stiff. This simple a-to-z exercise where you ‘write’
the letters of the alphabet with your toes gives your foot and ankle a thorough workout
in all planes of motion. When your Physio gives you the go ahead to
begin gradually loading the foot again, any exercise where we work on balance and stability
is a great option… just as long as nothing you do causes your foot pain. This single leg toe touch exercise is one
of my favourite balance and single leg stability exercises for runners! It’s so simple yet
so effective… Standing on one leg, maintain your balance
as you keep your back straight and pivot forwards from the hips. Reach down to touch your big
toe with your opposite hand, then stand up straight again. Of course it’s not just about the foot…
As I mentioned regarding mobility, we also need to address the hips when it comes to
keeping important muscles such as the glute complex in good functional condition. I really like this variation on a step-up
exercise where we add a resistance band just below the knee to force you to work harder
through those all-important abductor and external rotator muscles of the hip, such as glute
med and upper glute max. Keep the movement slow and deliberate while
stepping back and forth over a step for three sets of 1 minute When it comes to gradually returning to running,
there are also a number of exercises you can work on to build strength around the foot,
ankle and lower legs. When the time comes to resume running gradually,
your Physio should give you an appropriate return to running programme so that you can
gradually increase the cumulative stress on the injured metatarsal. Alongside the running programme you should
also ask your Physio about exercises you can use to compliment running in gradually reintroducing
the loading. Exercises such as heel and toe walking are
great for building strength and endurance in the muscles around the ankles. Jumping rope and jumping on its on are both
great low level ploy strict drills which will help you condition the low legs, feet and
ankles for running. As with the obvious progression – hopping – care should be taken in performing
these post metatarsal stress fracture. Little and often is the way forwards with these exercises,
so as to not overload the bone tissue as it remodels. I usually find that 5 X 20sec bouts of an
exercise like jumping rope is an adequate training load to begin with. Not too much,
but enough to have an effect. If you’re unsure, please always check with
your Physio. Best of luck with your rehab, and don’t
forget to check the link in the description to pick-up your free metatarsal stress fracture
rehab guide.

Upper Trapezius Release – Trigger Point Release Neck Pain Relief


Your Upper Trapezius Muscle works to shrug
your shoulder and can cause neck pain due to having Trigger Points, more commonly referred
to as knots. To find these areas, feel around your Upper
Trapezius muscle until you feel a tender spot. Press down on this spot and tilt your head
to the opposite side. You progress this release further by rotating
your head up and down. Perform this technique until relief is felt. This is an incorrect way to perform this and
can lead to more pain! The same technique can be performed by your
healthcare provider. Once they locate the spot they will passively
move your head into position. It’s important to perform until relief is
felt. So we can continue to make these free educational
videos, please subscribe to our channel.

Elbow Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo

Elbow Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo. I’m just
chillin out by the fireplace on a lazy rainy day.Who’s that at the door?
Hey, Nick, come on in. Come sit in my fancy chair. I met Nick at NextUp YouTube class of 2017
How you doing? I’m doing pretty good. How are you Doctor Jo? I’m doing great. Tell us a little bit
about your channel. Alright so my channel, we throw cards. So
what that means, give cards a little flick, throw them around. And the issue
that I run in to, is my subscribers and I, we run it to elbow pain. Ah yeah. All that throwing. I could see that that would be a very repetitive painful thing.
You know what? I think I’ve got some stretches and exercise for that. Yeah?
Let’s check them out right here. Whoa! It came all the way through. So with Nick’s repetitive movements of throwing those
cards, he gets a lot of pain in the elbow area. And sometimes it’s called tennis
elbow, sometimes called iPad elbow, and so now we can call it cards elbow. But a
great way to work these muscles, these muscles start at the elbow, but they come
all the way down to the wrist and they actually do a lot of movement at the
wrist, so those flicking motions that he does probably causes a lot of that to.
So we’re just going to stretch out these muscles all the way through. A good way
to start is to get those flexors and extensors by putting your arm straight
out if you put your fist, if you put your hands in and make a fist, and come up,
you’ll get a little bit of a stretch under here. If you want more of a stretch
put your fingers up into a stop sign position, and then you can put a little
bit of pressure over it this way. You should really feel that one underneath.
because you want to stretch both sides. So you’re going to hold this stretch for
about 30 seconds, and then do three of those. But you can alternate back and
forth to get those extensors by coming down this way. This is the opposite, if
your fingers are open it’s not quite as much of a stretch, but if you make a fist
you’re going to get a lot bigger stretch there, and then you can put a little bit
of pressure over that way. So I like to alternate back and forth through my 30
seconds and then a total of three on each side. So coming
up, doing that stretch, but really hold it for that 30 seconds if you can, and then
coming down and holding that stretch. Once you get those wrist flexors and
extensors stretched out a little bit, you can stretch your supination and
pronation, and the way I like to do that is grab a hammer or something that’s a
little top-heavy because that helps you get a little bit of an overpressure
stretch. Keep your elbow bent by your side because if you do it straight out
you’re going, to you’re going to rotate your whole shoulder, and we really want
to get down here at the elbow and the wrist. So bend that elbow, keep it by your
side, and then hold the hammer and just go down this way which is in the
supination. Hold it for about three to five seconds, and then come back the
other way into pronation. And so the little bit of the weight on the hammer
pulls it just a little bit more to give you that stretch going back and forth. So
it’s a nice little stretch it’s also a nice little exercise as well. I would
just start off with about ten of these on each side, and you can go smoothly or
just holding it a little bit. So after you get those stretched out a little bit,
you can go into doing some band work to help strengthen the area. There different
color bands are the different hardness of resistance, usually the yellow one is
the lightest and the red is the next lightest, so you might want to start off
with the lightest, but just getting some resistance in there to start building up
those muscles a little bit. And a lot of times people ask, well it’s sore, do I want
to do that, but with resistive bands, it works really well to kind of help get
that irritation out of there as long as you’re not overdoing it. If you want to
place your hand on a table or something, you can, or you can kind of hold your
elbow here, or if you feel good enough, you can just kind of hold it up into
this position. We’re going to start off with our palm down, and you just want to
do the movement at the wrist, but that’s really going to work those elbow muscles
up there as well, so pulling up this way, and then come all
the way down. So you want to come all the way through the movement, you don’t want
to stop here, you want to come all the way down, and then pull up and then nice
and slow back down. So again just starting off with about ten of these, you
don’t want to overdo it and irritate it even more, but you definitely want to
work it out and try and get that inflammation out of there. After you
do ten that way, turn it over. A lot of times I like to kind of get the band in
the middle area and then just go the opposite way. So now you’re going to curl
up and then slowly come back down. So same thing, just nice slow controlled
do about ten of those, but make sure when you come up, you’re not just
letting it plop back down. Control that band because you don’t want to injure
anything more, and then this coming down is equally as important, so make sure
that smooth control motion. Then next you’re going to come up into this
position where your thumb is up, and then you’re going to go what’s called the
radial deviation, which is pulling up this way, and then coming back down. So
again still doing that full movement all the way down, all the way up, and making
sure that you’re working the band, don’t let the band work you. And then the last
one with the band, it’s going to be an ulnar deviation, and the way I like to do
that is just hold it in both hands here with your thumb pointing towards each
other, and then you’re just going to take it and go out this way. So again,
controlling the band, nice smooth motion, going all the way out, coming all the way
in, and then just doing about ten of those, and really just with 10 of each
you’ll you’ll be able to feel that you’re working those muscles. So after
you work those you can take something like a towel, you can take a ball, you can
even just take a little small foam roll, and do some squeezes. So now you’re just
going to kind of squeeze in, hold it for about three to five seconds, and then
come out. So if you don’t have anything like a
roll you can just roll up a towel if you want to, but if you have something like a
tennis ball or Nerf ball, that works really well for kind of squeezing,
holding it for a little bit, and then let it go. And again you’ll be able to feel
that it’s working all these muscles here. And then so the last exercise is going
to be with a band, and then we’ll do some nice massages and stuff at the end. So
with the rubber band, take it, it doesn’t have to be fancy rubber band, it can just
be any rubber band, and put it around your fingers. And then with your fingers,
you’re just going to kind of open them up this way, and then slowly come back in.
So it’s the same thing with the band, when you come out don’t just let them
pop it back in, really control it coming back in. So you’re going to go out, and
then nice and slow back in. I just do maybe about ten of those as well. So
after you get all those exercises, you’re probably feeling a little bit, you’ve
worked those muscles, they feel nice and warm, and then to make it feel good
afterwards, you can do a massage on the area. So just getting some cream or some
lotion, but all these muscles at the wrist and elbow kind of come up here, and
they come up on this side too ,but probably the the motion especially that
Nick feels with that spin motion of the card is here, so just getting some lotion
to help make it easier to rub, but just doing some circular motions around this
area right here. Some people like to get a massager you can do that because the
vibration works really well too, but I also think just giving it a nice massage
on the on the muscles and the tendons that come up and attach right here, is
really nice as well. And if you use lotion, it will be a
little bit smoother, it’s not as much friction, but just to give you an idea
making little kind of circle motions right along that area in that elbow
joint right in there. And then so after you do this, you can do this for about 2
or 3 minutes, just to get it nice and calmed back down, and then my favorite at
the very end is an ice massage. So just grab an ice cube, and then I’ll
show you that real quick. So all you need is an ice cube.
Sometimes if you want a little bit more, you can take those little little cups
and put some ice in it, and then once it freezes you can tear the cup away, but I
like just having an ice cube kind of wrapped up in a paper towel. So what you
want to do with an ice massage is really only do about six minutes. Since it’s
direct ice on the skin, this is not a ten to fifteen minute kind of thing, but just
directly on there you’re going to start off really light, and you’re just going
to do some circles. And the reason you want to go really light is because at
first you’re really going to feel it’s going to feel cold, and it’s going to
feel burney and stingy, but if you can tolerate about a minute of that, then
it’ll kind of go numb, and once it goes numb, then you’re going to start putting
a little more pressure on it and doing the massage part. So really just getting
around in that area, that that area that’s irritated, those tendons maybe like a
tendinitis or the bursa a bursitis, or even the tennis elbow
which is epicondylitis, but just really working that area. The more it gets numb,
push harder, you really want to get that massage in there, you want that
irritation to get out of there, but you really only want to do this for
about six minutes. You don’t want to do it too much more than that,
and so I won’t go the whole six minutes, but that is what you would do. Alright
so there you have it. There you go, oh, those are your stretching exercise for a
little bit of elbow pain. Hey yeah, yeah yeah, so don’t forget to subscribe to Nick’s
channel. Don’t forget to subscribe to Ask Doctor Jo. And remember, be safe, have fun. And I hope feel better soon. Yeah!

Bud’s Story: Overcoming A Broken Neck and Fractured Skull


June 5th of 2015… I went up on a ladder. I was going to
paint the trim in our house. It shifted a little bit and I fell off the ladder, and
I hit my head on the way down on a beam and I knocked myself out and I face-planted
in the driveway. I got hurt really bad. I broke my neck, I fractured my skull, I broke in a couple
places and I broke every bone in my face. I
fractured my hip and I had a big gash over my left eye. When we arrived at Kindred, Bud was
still pretty well out of it. I cannot believe that it’s been 8 months and
I’ve made this much progress. Bob was the man. He took such good care of me. Bob not only was the respiratory guy, but
he was like he was my mentor. He had a great family, a wonderful family,
so that the support was there. He just had to be encouraged. He’s like you gotta fight through this,
you gotta put everything you got into this, you gotta push yourself. We have no magic pills here and no
magic wands, I said, but what we do have is a good
support structure to support your body’s gains. And your body will tell me how
quickly it’s ready to advance and make it through this. When I first came here they thought that
I was going to be here for 6 or 8 months, and I ended up going home just a little short of a month. It was
amazing the progress that he made. He just every day was coming along and
coming along, and I mean with the injuries that he had, the doctor that
took care of him here, Dr. Miranga, said that on paper it doesn’t look like this
should be possible. He’s a miracle and you guys had a hand
in that miracle at Kindred. We really can’t thank you enough.

Elbow Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo. I’m just
chillin out by the fireplace on a lazy rainy day.Who’s that at the door?
Hey, Nick, come on in. Come sit in my fancy chair. I met Nick at NextUp YouTube class of 2017
How you doing? I’m doing pretty good. How are you Doctor Jo? I’m doing great. Tell us a little bit
about your channel. Alright so my channel, we throw cards. So
what that means, give cards a little flick, throw them around. And the issue
that I run in to, is my subscribers and I, we run it to elbow pain. Ah yeah. All that throwing. I could see that that would be a very repetitive painful thing.
You know what? I think I’ve got some stretches and exercise for that. Yeah?
Let’s check them out right here. Whoa! It came all the way through. So with Nick’s repetitive movements of throwing those
cards, he gets a lot of pain in the elbow area. And sometimes it’s called tennis
elbow, sometimes called iPad elbow, and so now we can call it cards elbow. But a
great way to work these muscles, these muscles start at the elbow, but they come
all the way down to the wrist and they actually do a lot of movement at the
wrist, so those flicking motions that he does probably causes a lot of that to.
So we’re just going to stretch out these muscles all the way through. A good way
to start is to get those flexors and extensors by putting your arm straight
out if you put your fist, if you put your hands in and make a fist, and come up,
you’ll get a little bit of a stretch under here. If you want more of a stretch
put your fingers up into a stop sign position, and then you can put a little
bit of pressure over it this way. You should really feel that one underneath.
because you want to stretch both sides. So you’re going to hold this stretch for
about 30 seconds, and then do three of those. But you can alternate back and
forth to get those extensors by coming down this way. This is the opposite, if
your fingers are open it’s not quite as much of a stretch, but if you make a fist
you’re going to get a lot bigger stretch there, and then you can put a little bit
of pressure over that way. So I like to alternate back and forth through my 30
seconds and then a total of three on each side. So coming
up, doing that stretch, but really hold it for that 30 seconds if you can, and then
coming down and holding that stretch. Once you get those wrist flexors and
extensors stretched out a little bit, you can stretch your supination and
pronation, and the way I like to do that is grab a hammer or something that’s a
little top-heavy because that helps you get a little bit of an overpressure
stretch. Keep your elbow bent by your side because if you do it straight out
you’re going, to you’re going to rotate your whole shoulder, and we really want
to get down here at the elbow and the wrist. So bend that elbow, keep it by your
side, and then hold the hammer and just go down this way which is in the
supination. Hold it for about three to five seconds, and then come back the
other way into pronation. And so the little bit of the weight on the hammer
pulls it just a little bit more to give you that stretch going back and forth. So
it’s a nice little stretch it’s also a nice little exercise as well. I would
just start off with about ten of these on each side, and you can go smoothly or
just holding it a little bit. So after you get those stretched out a little bit,
you can go into doing some band work to help strengthen the area. There different
color bands are the different hardness of resistance, usually the yellow one is
the lightest and the red is the next lightest, so you might want to start off
with the lightest, but just getting some resistance in there to start building up
those muscles a little bit. And a lot of times people ask, well it’s sore, do I want
to do that, but with resistive bands, it works really well to kind of help get
that irritation out of there as long as you’re not overdoing it. If you want to
place your hand on a table or something, you can, or you can kind of hold your
elbow here, or if you feel good enough, you can just kind of hold it up into
this position. We’re going to start off with our palm down, and you just want to
do the movement at the wrist, but that’s really going to work those elbow muscles
up there as well, so pulling up this way, and then come all
the way down. So you want to come all the way through the movement, you don’t want
to stop here, you want to come all the way down, and then pull up and then nice
and slow back down. So again just starting off with about ten of these, you
don’t want to overdo it and irritate it even more, but you definitely want to
work it out and try and get that inflammation out of there. After you
do ten that way, turn it over. A lot of times I like to kind of get the band in
the middle area and then just go the opposite way. So now you’re going to curl
up and then slowly come back down. So same thing, just nice slow controlled
do about ten of those, but make sure when you come up, you’re not just
letting it plop back down. Control that band because you don’t want to injure
anything more, and then this coming down is equally as important, so make sure
that smooth control motion. Then next you’re going to come up into this
position where your thumb is up, and then you’re going to go what’s called the
radial deviation, which is pulling up this way, and then coming back down. So
again still doing that full movement all the way down, all the way up, and making
sure that you’re working the band, don’t let the band work you. And then the last
one with the band, it’s going to be an ulnar deviation, and the way I like to do
that is just hold it in both hands here with your thumb pointing towards each
other, and then you’re just going to take it and go out this way. So again,
controlling the band, nice smooth motion, going all the way out, coming all the way
in, and then just doing about ten of those, and really just with 10 of each
you’ll you’ll be able to feel that you’re working those muscles. So after
you work those you can take something like a towel, you can take a ball, you can
even just take a little small foam roll, and do some squeezes. So now you’re just
going to kind of squeeze in, hold it for about three to five seconds, and then
come out. So if you don’t have anything like a
roll you can just roll up a towel if you want to, but if you have something like a
tennis ball or Nerf ball, that works really well for kind of squeezing,
holding it for a little bit, and then let it go. And again you’ll be able to feel
that it’s working all these muscles here. And then so the last exercise is going
to be with a band, and then we’ll do some nice massages and stuff at the end. So
with the rubber band, take it, it doesn’t have to be fancy rubber band, it can just
be any rubber band, and put it around your fingers. And then with your fingers,
you’re just going to kind of open them up this way, and then slowly come back in.
So it’s the same thing with the band, when you come out don’t just let them
pop it back in, really control it coming back in. So you’re going to go out, and
then nice and slow back in. I just do maybe about ten of those as well. So
after you get all those exercises, you’re probably feeling a little bit, you’ve
worked those muscles, they feel nice and warm, and then to make it feel good
afterwards, you can do a massage on the area. So just getting some cream or some
lotion, but all these muscles at the wrist and elbow kind of come up here, and
they come up on this side too ,but probably the the motion especially that
Nick feels with that spin motion of the card is here, so just getting some lotion
to help make it easier to rub, but just doing some circular motions around this
area right here. Some people like to get a massager you can do that because the
vibration works really well too, but I also think just giving it a nice massage
on the on the muscles and the tendons that come up and attach right here, is
really nice as well. And if you use lotion, it will be a
little bit smoother, it’s not as much friction, but just to give you an idea
making little kind of circle motions right along that area in that elbow
joint right in there. And then so after you do this, you can do this for about 2
or 3 minutes, just to get it nice and calmed back down, and then my favorite at
the very end is an ice massage. So just grab an ice cube, and then I’ll
show you that real quick. So all you need is an ice cube.
Sometimes if you want a little bit more, you can take those little little cups
and put some ice in it, and then once it freezes you can tear the cup away, but I
like just having an ice cube kind of wrapped up in a paper towel. So what you
want to do with an ice massage is really only do about six minutes. Since it’s
direct ice on the skin, this is not a ten to fifteen minute kind of thing, but just
directly on there you’re going to start off really light, and you’re just going
to do some circles. And the reason you want to go really light is because at
first you’re really going to feel it’s going to feel cold, and it’s going to
feel burney and stingy, but if you can tolerate about a minute of that, then
it’ll kind of go numb, and once it goes numb, then you’re going to start putting
a little more pressure on it and doing the massage part. So really just getting
around in that area, that that area that’s irritated, those tendons maybe like a
tendinitis or the bursa a bursitis, or even the tennis elbow
which is epicondylitis, but just really working that area. The more it gets numb,
push harder, you really want to get that massage in there, you want that
irritation to get out of there, but you really only want to do this for
about six minutes. You don’t want to do it too much more than that,
and so I won’t go the whole six minutes, but that is what you would do. Alright
so there you have it. There you go, oh, those are your stretching exercise for a
little bit of elbow pain. Hey yeah, yeah yeah, so don’t forget to subscribe to Nick’s
channel. Don’t forget to subscribe to Ask Doctor Jo. And remember, be safe, have fun. And I hope feel better soon. Yeah!

What Are Different Types of Bone Fractures?

What Are Different Types of Bone Fractures?


Well, there are many different
types of bone fractures. Obviously, every
bone in the body is capable of being fractured. The most common one is
actually the collarbone. Certainly any parent
knows how frequently the collarbone can be broken,
seeing that in their kids. But we see different kinds
of fractures, first of all, in athletics. We see fractures
in elderly patients who have become osteopenic and
then osteoporotic or sustained fractures. Fractures can be
simple fractures, like a relatively simple line
fracture that’s non-displaced. They can be displaced
more simple fractures. In other words,
the fracture line which is relatively simple,
a single line, can be shifted and the fracture ends are
now either separated away from their desired location
or completely displaced apart from one another. You can have a
comminuted fracture, where the fracture line is very
jagged with multiple pieces that have formed. You can have an open fracture– in other words, where
a fracture has occurred and there is a break in the
skin overlying the fracture, which puts it at higher
risk for infection. So those are the basic types,
either simple non-displaced, simple displaced,
comminuted, or open.

Neck Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises  – Ask Doctor Jo

Neck Pain Relief Stretches & Exercises – Ask Doctor Jo


Oh, Oh! Hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo, and I’ve got my dynamic duo Wonder Remy and Wonder Jo, and today we’re going to show you some stretches and exercises to help relieve neck pain. So let’s get started. Are you ready? Are you ready? Let’s do it! So the first set of stretches for the neck are just going to be active range of motion. So you’re not putting pressure on it, you’re just getting that neck loosened up. So first you’re going to do a rotation side to side. So this one’s going to be a little bit of a continuous motion. You can pause for about two to three seconds on each side, but you’re just getting those muscles moving. So you want to start off just do about five on each side with that little pause, just to get those neck muscles right there warmed up a little bit. After you do the rotation side to side, then you’re going to do a side bending. With the side bending, you’re taking your ear towards your shoulder, but you’re not bringing your shoulder up to your ear. You want to keep your shoulders down and relaxed and then just side bend over trying to touch that ear to your shoulder, and again just hold it for about three to five seconds, and then come back to the other side. Try and keep your head in a fairly neutral position. Sometimes people kind of go down like that, but then you’re just changing the muscle that you’re that you’re working and stretching, so try and keep that head fairly forward when you side bend, so again just about five on each side just to get it loosened up. After you get those loosened up, then you’re gonna do a chin tuck. With the chin tuck, it’s not going downwards it’s tucking it back towards the back of your head. So again you want to keep your head level and you want to just push that chin backward, so you’re making a whole lot of little chins there, but I like using my finger as a target because then you can kind of see how much of a stretch you get. So hold it for about five seconds here, and then come back and you can see that now there’s a little space between my fingers which means I’m I’m working those muscles out a little bit, so that forward head movement that you might have then straightens back up. So again hold it for about five seconds, relax, and do about five of those. So now that you got all of those muscles warmed up a little bit, you’re going to go into some stretches. So now you’re going to do an upper trap stretch which is those muscles in the back up there. Those ones that are on the top of that diamond, and what they do is hold everything together so they get stressed out a lot, and they have a lot of tension in them. So if you want to stretch the right side, you’re going to put your right hand underneath your bottom, and what that does is it just kind of sets that shoulder and stabilizes it so it doesn’t come up while you stretch. So just kind of sitting on that arm there, take the other hand and then just gently pull your head towards the side. Again you want to keep that head in that kind of neutral position. You don’t want to turn your head you want to keep it upright and then just side bend over towards the other side. So for this you want to hold that stretch for 30 seconds, and then do that three times, but if you want to alternate back and forth, then you can give one side a break. Just make sure you do three on each side for 30 seconds, and I always like to do both sides even if you just have neck pain on your right side, doing both sides helps keep those muscles balanced. So the next stretch is for the levator scapulae. What that muscle does is it elevates or lifts the shoulder blades, that scapula, and when we’re stressed out we tend to kind of hunch up our shoulders and overwork that muscle, so it gets really tender and irritated and at the attachments up top on the neck and down low at that shoulder blade. There’s usually those really tender spots that you can push on, and we call those trigger points. So the way to stretch out that muscle is to take the hand on the side that you want to stretch and kind of put it on the back of the shoulder blade where your elbow is coming up a little bit. It doesn’t have to be super high, but by doing this that helps stabilize and push that scapula down to keep it in one spot while you’re stretching. You’re going to take the other hand and put it behind your head because when you pull forward it’s going to be at about a 45 degree angle away, so almost like you’re looking at your opposite knee. So it’s not straightforward down, it’s not straight to the side, it’s kind of in that angle. So you’re just going to come down this way, and you should feel it along that levator muscle right there. So just holding that stretch for about 30 seconds, switch sides, so then you come up stabilizing that shoulder blade and then pulling down towards that opposite knee for 30 seconds, and then doing three on each side. The next set of muscles are your scalene muscles, and those are the muscles in the front there. When those get tight, they can sometimes cause a little bit of nerve pain because the vessels run through those muscles and underneath those muscles, so when they get tight, they can put a lot of pressure on everything. So the way to stretch that is if you want to stretch your right side, you’re going to take your left hand and place it just above that collarbone kind of on those muscles. That’s going to kind of help stabilize that collarbone because they’re connected there at that clavicle, and so you want to keep it stabilized. You’re going to turn your head towards that side and then look up towards the ceiling while you’re putting a little pressure downwards on that collarbone. So again you’re going to hold that for 30 seconds, come back down, switch sides, opposite right over there turn your head, and look up getting that nice stretch through there, and doing that three times on each side. The last set of exercises are going to be to strengthen the muscles a little bit, but they’re going to be isometric exercises which is you’re not actually moving but you’re contracting the muscles. So the way to do that is we’re going to go back to those motions, but we’re going to put our hand on our head so we’re not moving our head anymore, but we’re pushing into that direction. So for a side bend, you want to put your hand on the side. This is the motion that you’re going to do, but you’re going to push into your hands and your head’s not actually moving. With this sometimes if your neck is painful, if you push really really hard, it hurts, so you want to feel tension, you want to feel pressure, but you don’t want it to be painful. So you might want to start off with just about a fifty percent push. So pushing into your head, and then relaxing. I’m moving my head a little bit just so you can see what I’m doing, but you really shouldn’t be moving anything. You’re pushing into your hand, getting that pressure. You might be able to see those muscles activating and then relaxing, so for just about five seconds push in, relax, and do three on each side. So if you want to alternate back and forth to give one side a break you can. So pushing in and then coming back, so about three to five seconds and then relax. So then the next one is going to be that rotation motion, so again you’re doing that movement, but you’re not going anywhere. So holding holding your head again, but now I’m doing that rotational movement. Pushing into my hand, so again about three to five seconds, switch sides, turning in that way three to five seconds, and then doing three on each side. And then the last one is going to be going forward. So again just pushing in your hand, but now it’s going to be on your forehead. So just kind of put the the bottom of the palm there so it’s comfortable, and then you’re pushing in like you’re doing that motion, so again pushing in three to five seconds, relaxing, pushing in three to five seconds, three times. Yeah we need a nap after that. Those were your stretches and exercises to help relieve neck pain. If you have any questions, leave them in the comments section, and I’d like to recognize our wall of thanks! Thanks Frank DG, and thanks Woody and Daisy! We appreciate your support. If you want to be on the patreon wall of thanks, click the box up here. And remember, be safe, have fun and I hope you feel better soon!

5 Pressure Points for Pain Relief – Ask Doctor Jo


oh hey everybody it’s Doctor Jo and Princess
Remy, and today I’m going to show you five pressure point relief spots. so
let’s get started. so pressure points don’t always work for everybody, but it’s a really good easy thing to try
and it does work sometimes. if you’ve got some stress, a lot of times these help
with headaches, so depending on if you’re stressed, if you’re anxious, or maybe
you’ve got some headaches, or just new kind of stress in your neck here, these are
really good to try cuz again, they’re quick, they’re easy. it might not work for
you, but I think it’s worth trying. a couple of them have really worked for me.
so each hold do you want to hold it for about five to ten seconds. and with
pressure points you want to put a good amount of pressure in there. sometimes
with some acupressure points and stuff you’re just placing your hand on this,
but this is actually a pressure point where you want to put some pressure on
there. so the first one is over your clavicle area. so you can either do this
on the clavicle bones, some people like that pressure point, or slightly below it.
I like to do it slightly below it because I feel like pressure points do
well on muscle areas, and so you’ve got a little bit of your muscles right down
below that clavicle right there or that collarbone. so you can try it on the bone,
but I like it better just underneath because there’s just a little kind of
groove that you can fit your fingers there. and so I’m pushing into that area.
I’m putting some pressure where it’s slightly uncomfortable. it’s not painful,
but I can definitely feel the pressure point there. so really again just pushing
five to ten seconds, maybe if you’re in a clinic having a therapist do it for you
they might do it a little bit longer, but just starting off you probably just want
to do that five to ten seconds. you can do it a couple times. you can switch and
then do it on the other side. so again there’s my clavicle or my collarbone
kind of in the middle of it this it sits here kind of coming in the middle that
little groove and just putting that pressure in through there. if you happen
to feel some numbness or tingling in your hands, if it’s strong you might just
be pushing on some nerves through there, so you might want to slightly adjust
because you don’t want to irritate the nerves. you really want this to be in the
muscle kind of area and again that five to ten
seconds. so the next one I’ve used this several times for headaches. so not
migraines, but just maybe like a tension headache or sometimes a dehydration
headache. you want to come down to where your thumb and your pointer finger meet
kind of in this little meaty area in between there’s a muscle here a big
thick muscle called your thenar muscle, and you’re kind of pushing in there and
in here. so you can see on each side almost like I’m pinching that area but
don’t just get the skin, if you come low you’re just gonna get the skin you want
to feel some muscle that you’re pushing on in there, and I can kind of feel it
tingle into my fingers. Not tingling like nerve pain, but where I’m hitting like a
pressure point and that’s what you want to feel. and so again I’m pushing pretty
hard for that five to ten seconds. and I’m going to show you when I let it up
you can kind of see where my fingernail mark is right there. so you know that I’m
pushing pretty hard and again you can do both sides. you can do it a couple times
like if you want to do two or three on each side,
but I’d maybe alternate back and forth. and again you can see that I’m pushing
pretty hard. you can see where it gets a little bit lighter right there because
I’m pushing into that area and then releasing it. so again, a lot of times
even though I’m pushing here, if you have a headache those pressure points kind of
work out throughout your body, so it can help a referred area kind of thing. you
can also do a little pressure point it’s called kind of your tendon triangle,
a little bit higher up at your thumb joint up top here. and for some people if
you can get it right, there’s a tendon coming here and a tendon coming here and
sometimes there’s a nice little groove or a pocket almost where those wrist
bones are. so you can use your thumb in between there or your finger, I kind of
like to use my thumb because I get a little bit more here, but again I’m
pushing right into that triangle around those tendons. so not necessarily on the
tendons, but in between in that pocket and again five to ten seconds holding it
switching sides getting that five to ten second hold and really just kind of
getting that pressure in there and getting everything to relax. and a lot of
times that’s just helps relieve that anxiety helps relieve your,
if you’re kind of stressed out because it almost kind of resets those muscles,
resets the whole meridian in your body. so then the next ones are for your
temple. so again this is another good one if maybe you have some tension headache,
or maybe at that dehydration headache you feel in the front. tension headaches
in the back or on the side, so just kind of finding your temples. you can do both
of these at the same time or if you just want to do one at a time you can, but
again with this one I like to use my fingers instead of pushing it with my
thumb’s just cuz it’s up on my temple area sometimes this is a little more
tender. but again I’m putting some pressure on there so I can feel that I’m
pushing. I’m not just placing my fingers there, I’m really kind of pushing in for
that five to ten seconds and really getting that push really getting that
feel, and you can do that a couple times if you want to. and then the last one is
another big one where you hold a lot of stress. you hold a lot of anxiety.
especially if you have a desk job, you work on the computer a lot, if you’re
typing. back here is your levator scapulae muscle, and this is the one that
brings our scapula or shoulder blades up. and if you come down to where that
muscle attaches to that shoulder blade or that scapula, a lot of times you can
feel a knot. you can feel that pressure point and so sometimes this one again if
you’re doing it to yourself, it’s a little easier using your fingers but
maybe if somebody else is willing to do it for you, sometimes using the thumb or
even using the tool so you don’t have to wear out your fingers. but I’m almost
just grabbing with my finger kind of going like this, you can see .and a lot of
times if you are stressed out or you’ve got a lot of you know tension in there,
you’re gonna find it pretty easy. you’re gonna oh that’s the spot and then just
push inwards with those fingers. so again maybe that five to ten seconds. if a
therapist was doing it for you, when I’m working on patient, I usually hold it for
about sixty to ninety seconds. so I’m holding it a lot longer to try and get
those muscles to release, but sometimes it’s a little harder to do on your own
and again if you’re doing this for the first time, you might not want to go
quite that long because you’re going to be sore afterwards. a lot of times when
you’re getting those pressure points or those trigger points in there, after you push on it it gets really sore. but then the next
day it actually feels better because it almost reset everything. oh oh yes.
so there’s your five stress relief pressure points. if you’d like to help
support my channel, make sure and click on the link up there, and don’t forget to
subscribe, where Remy? down there. and remember be safe, have fun, and I hope you feel better soon.