Young Hero: St John Ambulance Everyday Hero Awards

Young Hero: St John Ambulance Everyday Hero Awards


Grandad: It’s a bit of a blur. I got
up and saw my granddaughter off to uni and then went back upstairs, woke up
Logan, came down the stairs and – pow. That was it. Logan: I didn’t know he was having
a heart attack at the time. He wasn’t like himself so I knew something was definitely up. I’d done a lot of the training and it was kind of like these
situations, so I knew what I was doing, so I could relax and do what I can do. And
after I calmed nanny down it got a lot easier. Grandad: Logan’s my grandson. He’s been living with us for the last [together] 10 and a half years [laughs] He came to live with us when he lost his mum and dad couldn’t cope so we’ve been
together, we’ve grown together. Logan: I straightaway noticed that he was all
sweaty and hot and bothered, and he just wasn’t responding very well. I
loosened his collar at his neck so he could get more air, and I put him into a comfortable position. Luckily, the week before we had done the
W position, and the recovery position – all the positions that you needed. Once my Nana got on the phone and told them everything and then she passed the phone over to me
so I could answer some of the questions whilst she went round to next
door because luckily she’s a nurse. And then the ambulance turned up and it was
off to hospital. I was only on my own for like, 15 minutes?
Grandad: It was still a long time! Long long time.
Logan: I know. Grandad: When I came round and Brenda said to me, ‘Logan’s done this and done that,’ you know it was amazing, and I went, ‘Well he’s only just really begun to learn what to do,
and not to panic and to do what he’s supposed to do,’ – it was incredible really. It was my first time performing first aid other than training. I definitely recommend going through St John Ambulance to learn first aid because they’ve
helped me understand a lot and helped me get better. To know it was my granddad, I felt
more relaxed because I knew him. Grandad: We always were strong. Our relationship’s been really pretty good you know from when he was little and up to now. Logan: my Grandad means the world to me. Grandad: I think Logan saved my life. 100%.

How to Treat an Injured Bleeding Baby – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

How to Treat an Injured Bleeding Baby – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


As your baby crawls around your home or outside, they can very easily graze or cut themselves. Most of the time the injury will not be too bad, but sometimes there can be serious bleeding. If there is blood flowing from a wound and it doesn’t stop, your baby has severe bleeding. To treat a severe bleed, remove any clothing from the area your baby is bleeding from. If there’s something in the wound, leave it where it is and apply pressure around the wound to try to push the edges together. If there’s nothing in the wound, apply pressure directly to it with a sterile dressing or a clean, non-fluffy pad. Next you need to ask a helper to call 999 or 112 for emergency help. Or if there is no one around to help, use a mobile on speakerphone so you can keep treating your baby while you speak to the emergency services. Tell them where the bleeding is and the amount of bleeding. Apply a firm bandage around the dressing on top of the wound. It needs to maintain pressure, but not restrict the circulation. Check the circulation by pressing a fingernail on the skin around the bandage for five seconds, release the pressure and if the colour does not return within two seconds the bandage is too tight and you should loosen it. Severe bleeding can lead to shock, so make sure they are lying down on a blanket or rug to protect them from the cold and raise their legs, but don’t raise an injured leg. You could hold a small baby in the recovery position. If the blood soaks through the dressing, apply a second dressing on top of the first. If it soaks through both, remove both dressings and apply a new one. Keep checking circulation every 10 minutes. While you’re waiting for help to arrive, keep checking your baby’s breathing and level of response. So remember, if your baby has a severe bleed, apply pressure around the wound if there’s something stuck in it, or apply direct pressure to the wound if it’s clear. Call 999 or 112 for emergency help and tell them where the bleeding is and the amount. Secure the dressing and check circulation, if blood comes through apply a second dressing. But if blood comes through both, take them both off and start again. Check circulation every 10 minutes, keep checking your baby’s breathing and level of response while you wait for help. And that’s how you treat a baby who’s got a severe bleed. Thanks for watching. Help support St John Ambulance and donate today.

What to do if Your Baby has a Burn or Scald – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

What to do if Your Baby has a Burn or Scald – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


As your baby crawls or toddles around exploring the world, they may come into contact with something that can burn or scald them.
A burn is usually caused by dry heat, like a flame or a fire, a hot iron, or sunburn.
A scald is caused by wet heat, like steam or a hot cup of tea.
If your baby has a burn or scald you might see some of these signs.
They may cry or have pain in the area They may have a reddened, swollen patch of skin They may have blisters
Or they may have peeling skin If you think your baby has a burn or scald,
move them away from the source of the heat. Cool the burn or scald by running it under
cold water, for at least 10 minutes. Don’t use ice, gels or creams on the area
– they can damage the affected skin and increase the risk of infection.
Remove the clothing from around the burn. If the clothing is stuck to the skin, don’t try to remove it. Cover the burn with cling film or a clean plastic bag. Get rid of the first few centimeters, place a single sheet over the burn and scrunch the edges. But don’t wrap it around the limb.This protects it from infection. Always seek medical advice if your baby has a burn or a scald.
If the burn or scald is on the baby’s face, hands or feet, or if the injured area is larger
than the size of the baby’s hand, or if it is a deep burn, then it’s a serious
burn or scald. Serious burns or scalds need emergency treatment,
so call 999 or 112. While you wait for the ambulance, treat your
baby for shock if necessary. So remember, move them away from the heat Cool the burn with water for at least 10 minutes. Protect the burn with cling film.
Call 999 or 112 for an ambulance. And that’s how you treat a baby with a burn
or scald. Thanks for watching, help support St John Ambulance, donate today

First Aid for Life on SKY News

First Aid for Life on SKY News


– A hard-hitting campaign’s been launched, urging parents to learn basic first aid. Now, please be warned that
Mike McCarthy’s report contains video of the new advert, which does contain pictures of a child falling from a tree. – The powerful new advert from an award-winning director examines the moment a parent faces the panic and helplessness of trying to save his unconscious son. – Say something, buddy! – She can be the difference between life and death. But what she can’t do is be there every time. – Help! – It’s a situation that Siobhan Fullwood faced for real, when her daughter Grace began to choke. – Grace was sitting in the front room, she was sucking a lollipop. The lollipop came off its stick, and stuck in her throat. She came into the kitchen towards me. And I could tell something
was wrong straight away. And she wasn’t making any noises, she was just very pale. And I said, “Is the lollipop stuck?” And she just nodded. So what I did, instinctively, even though I haven’t been trained, is I slapped her on the back, not in the right place unfortunately. Look Grace, here comes the ambulance. – Siobhan admits that Grace
was saved through luck, rather than any
understanding of first aid. Many others are not so fortunate. At Land of Play in Manchester, parents know their kids
are in a safe environment. Have they ever thought what they would do in a first aid emergency? My son had a fit and it was a febrile convulsion when they overheat. There’s nothing you can do about it when they’re having the fit, but that frightened me. So I did a course. – I wouldn’t feel confident
to go and help them, ’cause I’d probably just make it worse. – Up till now, I’ve not
really thought about it. But we have been lucky that we’ve never had any real serious
incidents with the children. I think until you have a serious
incident with your child, then maybe you don’t think
about doing a first aid course. (quiet muttering) As a result of her experience, Siobhan decided to take
a first aid course. Far better, says St. John Ambulance, than facing a lifetime of regret. – Help! – Mike McCarthy, Sky News. – And joining us from
our Westminster studio is Emma Hammett, a nurse
and first aid trainer at First Aid for Life Good morning to you So, we see there it
can mean the difference between life and death. For those people in any
doubt as to the importance of first aid skills, what would you say? – I think it’s absolutely crucial. A practical first aid training course makes a massive difference. We have lots of people who come to us, prompted by an accident that’s happened. We’ve also that have come on our course, and then have felt empowered afterwards, and have had something happen, and have written us fantastic
letters to say thank you. So it works both ways, but it’s very sad that it’s something going wrong, or that feeling of helplessness that prompts people to contact us. – And do enough people have
these skills, do you think? If we’re looking at the population, then what sort of percentage do you think, of people actually know
what to do in an emergency? – Actually, a scarily small proportion. And there’s a lot of people
that think they know. Things like burns. And, I mean the thing about first aid is that first aid is what you do in that first initial, immediate moment. And it’s knowing what to do then that makes the difference. So things like burns, actually knowing to put it straight under
cool running water, and keeping calm, and having that knowledge so that you are able to do it, is an amazing feeling. And it should be a very
reassuring feeling. – And how important is it for people to keep up with these skills, because people might say, “Oh, I’ve done the first aid course,” and they may have done it at some point. But would they actually be able to remember it at a crucial moment? – No, it’s very, very important. It’s very important to keep your practical first aid courses up to date, and also to do some sort of an online, or to have your book, or whatever. So do an online update, and in between, as well as a practical update. Though nothing beats a
practical first aid course, but some of the online elements, and the way that St. John
talks you through the online, and we have onlinefirstaid.com, too, which makes a massive difference to just supporting that learning, and keeping up to date, if
you’re not using it all the time. – And what are the most common emergencies that people could come across, then? What are the key things
for people to remember? – Things like choking, knowing what to do if someone chokes, knowing how to keep completely calm. If someone’s choking,
and you panic as well, it’s going to make it harder
for them to breathe as well. So knowing not to rush straight into the Heimlich manoeuvre
as they do on telly, because that can’t always be helpful. So to do the firm back blows on the back. Knowing what to do with a burn. Knowing what to do initially, if someone had a major bleed, for example, and knowing what to do with all that before you phone an ambulance. Knowing what to do, and
knowing what not to do. If someone’s fallen from a major height, knowing when to move them,
and when not to move them, and what the crucial priorities are that you’re looking out for. And all those need to be learned from a practical first aid course with properly qualified trainers, who’ve actually used it as well. And can answer questions,
talk around the subject, and can really help you to understand why you’re doing it, rather than learning it by rote. And how often, then, should people be brushing up on these skills? You were talking there about people going online and doing refresher courses, but what would your advice be to people about how regularly that they should keep these skills up to date? – Depends what they’re doing. I mean, obviously, if you’re
in a childcare setting, at the minimum, I would suggest that you should be doing a
refresher course every year, as well as your more in depth course every three years. The brushing up online is an adjunct. It’s something for
parents to have as well, just to keep it fresh in their mind. The same as flicking through
your first aid manual and making sure that it stays fresh, that it stays in your head, so that if you’re in a panic situation, your adrenaline kicks in, and other things seem to leave you, that you are able to
remember that information, and that it is firm enough into your brain that it comes naturally. – Good advice. Thanks for joining us. That’s Emma Hammett there,
nurse and first aid trainer.

What to Do if you Suspect Meningitis – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

What to Do if you Suspect Meningitis – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


If someone has meningitis they won’t usually show all the signs and symptoms at the same time The key points to look for are flu-like symptoms with a temperature, cold hands and feet, joint
and limb pain, and blotchy or very pale skin. As the infection develops, there may be a
severe headache, neck stiffness, drowsiness, vomiting, their eyes may become sensitive
to light, and in a baby there may be high-pitched moaning, a whimpering cry, floppiness or a
tense, bulging soft spot to the top of their head. If anybody shows the signs or symptoms of meningitis, like shielding their eyes from
the light, then call for an ambulance immediately and treat the fever. Check to see if they have a rash. Most rashes will fade when you press the spots under the
side of a glass. If the spots don’t fade, call for an ambulance immediately.
While waiting for an ambulance, reassure them and keep them cool.
Be sure to check their level of response, pulse and breathing. Remember, call for an ambulance, check for a rash, keep them cool. That’s how we treat somebody suffering from meningitis.

What To Do If Your Baby Had an Electric Shock – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

What To Do If Your Baby Had an Electric Shock – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


Crawling babies can get their fingers into all kinds of places in your home. If they put their fingers into electric sockets or appliances, such as hairdryers or phone chargers it’s possible for your baby to get an electric shock. This can be very serious. If your baby has had an electric shock, you might see some of these signs. They may have burns, blistered or charred skin They may have pain or weakness. An electric shock can make your baby unresponsive. If you think your baby has had an electric shock, you will need to do a baby primary survey. If your baby is still in contact with the electrical current, turn the power off if you can or use something non-metallic to break the contact, like a rolled up magazine or a wooden spoon. Try to see if your baby responds to you by gently tapping or flicking the sole of their foot and call their name. They are unresponsive if they don’t respond to you. Martha, can you hear me? Next you will need to check if they are breathing. To check for normal breathing open the airway. Place one hand on your baby’s forehead and very gently tilt their head back. With one finger, gently lift the chin to open the airway and check to see if they’re breathing. If your baby is breathing, put them into the recovery position Cradle the baby in your arms, with their head tilted downwards. If your baby has suffered an electric shock and has stopped breathing you need to start baby CPR.This technique is for use on babies under 1 year old. Call for help. Ask a helper to call 999 or 112 for emergency help. Use a mobile speaker phone if you’re on your own, so you can start CPR as soon as possible. If you’re on your own and don’t have a speaker phone, you need to do CPR for a minute before calling for help. Place them on a firm surface and open their airway. With one hand on the forehead gently tilt their head back and with your fingertip, gently lift the chin to open the airway. Pick out any visible obstructions from the mouth and nose. Step one is puff. Take a breath, put your lips around your baby’s mouth and nose and make a seal. Blow gently and steadily for up to one second. The chest should rise. Remove your mouth and watch the chest fall.That’s one rescue breath or puff. Do this five times. Step two is pump or chest compressions. Put two fingers in the centre of your baby’s chest and push down a third of the depth of the chest. Release the pressure allowing the chest to come back up before pressing back down again. Repeat this 30 times at a rate of 100 to 120 pumps per minute. This is quite quick After 30 chest pumps, open the airway and give a further two puffs. Continue to alternate between 30 chest pumps and two puffs. If you’re on your own and don’t have a speaker phone, stop after one minute and call 999 or 112 for emergency help. If a mobile phone is not available and you have to move to get to a telephone, take the baby with you. Keep repeating 30 pumps then two puffs until help arrives or they become responsive. You may also need to treat burns. Move them away from the source of heat, cool the burn or scald by running it under cold water for at least 10 minutes. Don’t use ice, gels or creams on the area, they can damage the affected skin and increase the risk of infection. Remove the clothing from around the burn. If the clothing is stuck to the skin don’t try to remove it. Cover the burn with cling film or a clean plastic bag. This protects it from infection. Serious burns or scalds need emergency treatment, so call 999 or 112. While you wait for the ambulance, treat your baby for shock if necessary. So remember, break contact with the electrical current with something non-metalic Check if they’re responding and breathing. If your baby is breathing then put them into the recovery position and call for help. If your baby is not breathing, start baby CPR. You may also need to treat burns so cool the burn with cold water, remove your baby’s clothing unless it’s stuck to the burn and cover the burn with cling film or a a clean plastic bag. And that’s how you treat a baby who’s been electrocuted. Thanks for watching. Help support St John Ambulance, donate today.

How to do Child CPR – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

How to do Child CPR – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


If after performing a primary survey, you
find a child who is unresponsive and not breathing normally, call for help. Ask someone to phone 999 or 112, and ask them to bring an AED if one is available, while you begin CPR immediately. If you’re by yourself and do not have a speakerphone, start CPR with five initial rescue breaths, then 30
chest compressions and 2 rescue breaths for one minute before calling for help. To give rescue breaths, open the airway
by tilting the head back with one hand on the forehead and two fingers under
the chin. Pick out any obstructions from their mouth to clear the airway only if
you can clearly see something. Keeping the head in this position, pinch the
soft part of the nose. Allow the mouth to fall open. Take a deep breath and seal your mouth around theirs. Blow steadily into their mouth, giving a rescue breath in about one
second. The chest will rise. Remove your mouth from theirs and watch their chest fall. Give them five initial rescue breaths at about one breath per second, like this. To do chest compressions, kneel down by
child, beside their chest. Place only one hand on the centre of the chest. Lean over the child with your arms straight and press down vertically one-third of its
depth. Release the pressure. Allow the chest to come back up without removing your hand from
the chest. Repeat this to give 30 chest
compressions at a rate of 100 to 120 beats per minute. This is quite fast and to help you, you
can sing Nellie the Elephant, which can help you
to keep up with the pace. After thirty chest compressions, open the airway and
give them a further two rescue breaths. Continue to alternate between thirty
chest compressions and two rescue breaths until help arrives. If you’re on your own and don’t have a
speakerphone, stop after one minute and call 999 or 112 for emergency help If a mobile phone is not available and you have to move to get a telephone, take the child with you if you are able. Do not leave the child to look for an AED – the emergency services will bring one with them. If there is someone there who can help, if they brought an AED, ask them to turn it on and follow instructions while you continue CPR. If they can help you perform CPR, you can swap over every one to two minutes with
minimal interruptions to chest compressions. Continue CPR until emergency help
arrives and takes over, the child starts to show signs of becoming responsive,
they start breathing normally or opening their eyes, or you become too exhausted to
continue. If they do start breathing normally again, put them in the recovery position. So remember: if you come across a child
that’s unresponsive and not breathing normally, call for help. Tell a helper to call
999 or 112 straightaway and ask them to bring an AED. Give five initial rescue breaths Then thirty chest compressions followed by two rescue
breaths. Continue giving 30 chest compressions to 2 rescue breaths until
help arrives, or the child starts to breathe. And that’s how we perform CPR on a
child. If this video has been helpful to you,
help support St John Ambulance by going to sja.org.uk/donate

How to Treat Heat Rash – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

How to Treat Heat Rash – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


Heat rash, or prickly heat, is an itchy rash of small red spots that can cause a stinging or prickly feeling on
the skin. The rash can be anywhere on the body, but usually people get it on their face, chest, back and thighs. It is caused by sweat glands becoming blocked so people usually get the rash if
they’re sweating more than usual. Heat rash isn’t serious. It will usually go away after a few days so it doesn’t normally need medical attention. There are four signs of heat rash to look for: itching, a rash of tiny red spots, mild swelling, and a prickling or burning
feeling. If someone has heat rash, you should
explain that the rash is not serious but give them tips on how to soothe the itching and avoid getting the heat rash in the future. You can suggest they take a cold bath or
shower to cool the skin and help prevent further sweating. They can also buy calamine lotion or hydrocortisone cream which will help to soothe the itching. Recommend that they wear loose clothing made of cotton as cotton doesn’t trap heat as much a synthetic fibres like nylon and polyester. Tell them to drink plenty of water to stop
them getting dehydrated and suggest they avoid excessive heat or humidity by staying out of the sun and not sitting
too close to a fire or heater. So remember: when treating heat rash suggest a cold bath or shower, use calamine lotion, suggest loose clothing and drink plenty
of water. And that’s how you treat heat rash.

If Your Baby has a Seizure – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

If Your Baby has a Seizure – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


Although it can be very worrying to see your
baby having a seizure, if it is dealt with properly it is rarely dangerous.
Your baby may have a seizure if they have a high temperature, which is sometimes caused
by an infection. The electrical systems in a baby’s brain
are not developed enough to cope with a high temperature and that is why they are more
likely to have seizures. If your baby is having a seizure you might
see some of these signs. They may shake vigorously, arching their back
and clenching their fists They may have signs of a fever such as hot,
flushed skin or sweating Their face may twitch and their eyes may be
squinting, or fixed or upturned They may hold their breath and dribble with
a red, puffy face and neck They may vomit
They may wet themselves or soil themselves They may not respond to you as usual. If you think your baby is having a seizure you need to protect them from hurting themselves.
Don’t hold them down or restrain them and don’t try to move them. Just clear away
any dangerous objects and put pillows or soft padding around them. When the seizure has stopped, take off any clothing that isn’t needed. But take care
they don’t get cold. Put your baby into the recovery position and
call 999 or 112 for an ambulance. Reassure your baby and keep them calm.
While you wait for the ambulance check your baby’s breathing, pulse and whether they
can respond to you. So remember, don’t move or restrain your baby Remove dangerous objects nearby and protect
your baby with soft padding Take off excess clothing and place your baby
in the recovery position Call 999 or 112
Keep your baby calm Keep checking their pulse and breathing while waiting
for the ambulance And that’s how we treat a baby who’s having
a seizure. Thanks for watching, help support St John Ambulance, donate today.

What to do if Your Baby has Fever – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

What to do if Your Baby has Fever – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


If your baby is unwell and has a fever, it
can be very worrying. If you think your baby has a fever, there
are six key things to look for: Early on:
You might notice a high temperature – above 37°C, they may have pale skin
they may feel cold, with goose pimples, shivering and chattering teeth.
Then, later you might notice hot, flushed skin and sweating,
a headache and general aches and pains. Take your baby’s temperature using a thermometer. If it’s above 37°C, it’s a fever. Help make them comfortable and don’t overdress
them or remove too many clothes. Don’t cool them down so much that you’re making them shiver. Give them regular drinks. If they are breastfed, feed them regularly. And you can offer them water to drink. This will help to keep them hydrated and replace
any fluid they may lose from sweating. If your baby is distressed, you can give them
the recommended dose of paracetemol. Remember, always check the information
on the container and don’t give aspirin-based medicine to anybody under 16. Check your baby frequently, including during
the night. If you’re worried about their condition,
they have a seizure or fit then call 999 or 112 A temperature above 38°C is unusual under
3 months, or over 39 C above 3 months, call for a doctor or NHS direct for advice. If they seem to be getting worse then call
999 or 112 for an ambulance and be prepared to treat them for a seizure. So remember Check their temperature and keep them cool Give them plenty of fluids,
If their temperature’s over 38°C for a baby under 3 months or above 39°C in a baby over 3 months, get medical advice. If they’re getting worse, call 999 or 112 And that’s how you treat a baby with a fever. Thanks for watching, help support St John Ambulance, donate today.