Pool safety: first response safety steps that could save a life

Pool safety: first response safety steps that could save a life


As we head towards summer, it’s important to be reminded of what to do if there is an incident around the pool. D is for danger. Make sure you check for danger, for yourself, for other people, and for your casualty. R is for response. See if you can get a response from your casualty. S is for send for help. If you can’t send for help, send someone else to call 000 and make sure that they come back. A is for airways. Check the airways. If there is an obstruction, make sure you clear it. B is for breathing. Look, listen and feel for any sign of normal breathing for 10 seconds. C is for CPR. Commence CPR, and just remember, it’s 30 compressions to two breaths. D is for defibrillator. Attach the device and follow the prompts. Make sure you stay safe this summer.

Injury Prevention Exercises for Swimmers

Injury Prevention Exercises for Swimmers


Hi there! I’m Chloe Sutton. I’m a two-time
Olympian and the first American woman to swim open water in the Olympics. Now I
started training at an elite level from about age 11 and I would do anywhere
from 80,000 to 100,000 meters per week in the pool. Now that’s
62 miles per week and that’s a lot of training and that’s a lot of strain on
your shoulders, but over the course of 15 years, I never had any shoulder injuries
of any kind and I attribute this to having a shoulder stabilization routine
that I would do after every workout. Now today I’m going to share with you five
exercises that I believe will help you keep your shoulders safe and healthy
through a long career. The first exercise is an external
rotation to strengthen the rear part of the rotator cuff. Anchor the theraband
to a pole and then rotate your arm away from your body while maintaining a
90-degree angle in your elbow. Another exercise that strengthens the
rear part of the rotator cuff as well as the upper back is shoulder extensions.
Keeping the theraband anchored, hold it in your hand extended down with your
arms slightly in front of you. Then drive your arm back while keeping your arm
straight. Next is a low row to strengthen the
muscles that hold the scapula in the proper position. This helps to correct
poor posture. Again anchor the theraband to a pole, this time taking both sides in
your hands. Then pull your elbows directly back being sure to squeeze your
shoulder blades together each row. Now we’re going to stabilize the
shoulder joint by writing the alphabet with a tennis ball against the wall.
Lean slightly forward so you have a little bit of weight on the tennis ball
to keep it in place. Then move your whole arm keeping your elbow straight and
your shoulders down while drawing the alphabet. The last exercise is arm raises. With
this exercise we’re working on the part of the rotator cuff that lifts the arm. Stand with good posture, then lift your arms slightly in front of you keeping
your arms straight. Focus on keeping your chest lifted and your shoulder blades
retracted. Once you feel confident with this
exercise, you may also add a light weight So if you guys do these five exercises
after every workout, it will help to strengthen and stabilize your shoulders
and help you to have a long and healthy career. So thank you so much for watching, please subscribe to me on Youtube, and visit my website for more swimming tips.
Thanks so much and I’ll see you all soon.

How to Protect Yourself from Stingrays

How to Protect Yourself from Stingrays


How to Protect Yourself from Stingrays. Death by stingray is extremely rare, but getting
hit with their barb still hurts like hell – which is why you need to learn how to
play footsie safely with these sea creatures. You will need An ability to shuffle your feet
Very hot water or a chemical heat pack Water shoes (optional) Stingray guards or leggings
(optional) and a thermometer (optional). Step 1. Know where stingrays like to hang out – in
shallow water along the ocean shoreline and near the mouth of a bayou. Step 2. Do The Stingray Shuffle. Slide your feet along the ocean floor rather
than lifting them; it will prevent you from stepping down hard on a stingray – the most
common way of getting stuck by the serrated stinger on its tail. Plus, the movement warns stingrays that you’re
in the area. Step 3. Consider wearing water shoes. If you do step on a stingray, your footwear
may prevent the barb from penetrating. Step 4. If you’re stepping into murky water from a
boat, poke around with a stick before you set down your foot. Invest in stingray guards or leggings if you
do a lot of wade fishing. Step 5. If you do get stung and are bleeding, apply
pressure to stem the bleeding and seek immediate medical care. Step 6. If the injury is minor, remove the stinger
with tweezers, being careful not to squeeze it further into the skin. Clean the area with soap and water, and plunge
it the hottest water you can tolerate for 30 minutes. Or, apply a chemical heat pack. The heat kills the venom that causes the intense
pain. Test the water with a thermometer before immersing
the wounded area so you don’t burn yourself. The water shouldn’t be above 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Step 7. Have a doctor clean out the wound to make
sure none of the barb remains in your body. Left-behind pieces will cause infection. Did you know About 1,500 Americans are injured
by stingrays every year.

Common Swimming Injuries

Common Swimming Injuries


>Common injuries here?>Common injuries
here again can be your overuse as we can see in the video, the freestyle the
overhead forward stroke can cause the most common injury which is a swimmers
shoulder. Another injuries specific with swimming is breaststrokers knee which
can result in a overuse or medial knee pain due to that frog leg kick.>And since
you mentioned swimmers shoulder we have a 3D image we’d like to show our viewers
and tell us what’s going on here right here doctor. Obviously the animation is
extremely cool but we’re doing maybe a breast stroke?>We’re doing here… it almost
looks like a backstroke actually, so okay with the Freestyle stroke we want to see
that the arm is actually going forward and as the arm enters the water it’s
during the catch phase and then the pull for the drag. When we have that water
resistance during the pool we put extra tension on the rotator cuff and can lead
to anterior shoulder pain and essentially mimic a shoulder impingement
and what that is is where the proximal humerus up by the shoulder is impinging
just under the acromion, which is a bone that lives right here, within that space
is the rotator cuff and the the subacromial bursa. Those soft tissues get
pinched between the bones get angry inflamed and painful.>And what is the
patient feeling? it’s just constant pain?>Well it’s an anterior shoulder pain,
basically brought on with that increased stress as I mentioned. When you pull that
water back and you’re moving through the pool that stress of that weight you’re
moving back to propel yourself forward puts increased stress on the shoulder.