How To Help Our Colleagues With Mental Illness | Incident Report 156

How To Help Our Colleagues With Mental Illness | Incident Report 156


– [Logan] One second. All
right, I think we’re live, Z. – Don’t make me get in my zone. Don’t make me check on my phone. Ball so hard ZPAC wanna find me. I don’t know where we are
right now, Tom Hinueber. We’re talking about mental illness and I already feel unwell, mentally. – Well, yeah – [Z] You know. – Yeah. – [Z] You know. Guys, guys, today’s
show is real important. I’ll tell you why. Margot Kidder died. Margot Kidder, for those who
don’t know, was Lois Lane in the classic Superman series.
The first Superman series, I think the first three or
four, she was Lois Lane. And she was a big part of
my childhood, Tom Hinueber. She was beautiful. She
was smart. She was strong. Even though Superman was a
douche, she kinda kept up, and did her thing. She was a reporter. She was a feminist before
being a feminist was a thing. – How are those Superman
movies still so much better than the ones they made with all the CGI? – Dude, I’m tellin’ you,
it’s just like the original Star Wars episodes are better,
you start throwing CGI, it doesn’t feel right. It’s just like health 2.0,
it doesn’t feel right to us, clickin’ the boxes and
staring at the computer. It’s not medicine anymore, right? So, Margot Kidder got rather
more famous for something that went wrong with her. And that was a mental
breakdown that she had in 1996, where she was found in the
backyard in a house in Glendale, which we all know is the Armenian
capital of the free world. – It’s Little Armenia, Z. – Lil’, Lil’ Armenia, and
by the way, everyone thinks that I’m Armenian ‘cuz
my last name’s Damania. They wanna add an “n” onto
to it, so I’m “Damanian,” and I grew up in Central
Valley of California, which was Little Armenia, and
so I feel like an honorary Armenian. – You know, it’s funny,
I have an Armenian aunt. So, little white privilege
Tom Hinueber actually grew up eating [Phonetic Zahk Tar
Za] and stuff like that. – That’s amazing. You can finally assign
yourself to an actual, legitimate genocide. That’s amazing. – (laughs) – Um, so, which, by the way
that was a real genocide. I don’t care what you say,
Turkish people. You’re liars. – Turkish people are dicks, Z. – [Z] They kind of are. – They really are. – They really are. I
have no idea if they are. I know Dr. Oz is Turkish,
and I hate Dr. Oz so maybe that’s a thing. Anyway, so, Margot
Kidder, speaking of ADHD and metal illness, Margot
Kidder famously had that breakdown in ’96 and they way
that the press treated her at that time was
absolutely unconscionable. They literally made her out
to be this crazy, ex, has-been star who had hit rock-bottom,
was found in this backyard with the caps missing from
her teeth, totally disheveled, wearing rags. And what
came out later is that she’d been suffering with
mental illness for a long time, was diagnosed with what they
were calling manic depression, or bi-polar and had multiple,
sort of mini-breakdowns over the course of her
career, even at the peak of her powers, but no one knew about this. And the stigma of mental illness
was applied to this lady, who had, again, this amazing acting career and she was treated like crap. In fact, one of my favorite
shows, “The Family Guy” actually did something
really horrible to her. Can we roll that clip Logan?
Do you have that clip? – Of course. – Margot Kidder was here. – Oh, we loved you in the Superman movies. You were just wonderful. – (Screams) – I mean, so, look, I
love “The Family Guy” as much as the next
guy, but that sort of… Okay, imagine this, Tom,
like what if Freddie Mercury is dying of AIDS, and
they do the similar clip where it’s Freddie
Mercury writhing in pain from an opportunistic
infection in a hospital bed, and “The Family Guy” does that clip. Would that not have generated outrage of an order of magnitude that
would’ve wrecked the show? – Yeah. It definitely would’ve. I hate that clip. It’s
just, that’s mean, man. And it’s like, where’s
the joke? There’s no joke. – Here’s the thing, Tom
Hinueber is one of the meanest people I know, and that’s why I love him. For him to say that, means that this is a particularly mean clip. And again, you have
family members who suffer from mental illness. My
mother is a psychiatrist. I treat a lot of patients
and have that suffer from mental illness. The
stigma is huge, but part of the reason we wanna talk about
this today in particular, apart from the Margot Kidder
story, which, I think in later life she became an
advocate for mental health. Which is why we have a link
at the bottom here to donate to the National Alliance on Mental Illness ’cause we want to support
people who are supporting destigmatizing mental illness. This idea that we in healthcare
suffer disproportionately from mental illness, including
PTSD, suicidality, burnout, emotional detachment, and
then other mental illness, and the stigma in healthcare
is so strong that we can’t talk about it for fear of being fired. We can’t talk about it as
physicians for fear of licensure renewal. They ask you specific
questions in certain states. Are you diagnosed with a mental illness? Have you been on medications? These kind of things are …
what they do is set up a stigma so that people don’t seek help. Then we have higher than
the normal population levels of suicide, of… – [Tom] Z, fix your mic. – What’s wrong with my mic? – [Tom] It turns into
your beautiful chest. – It’s not easy having
world-class chesticles. – [Logan] It’s not. – It really isn’t. And, you know what? My fans appreciate
that. All three of them. So, this idea then, that
we’re so stigmatized that we can’t even seek
help has been huge. Now, this came to a head actually, ZPAC. So, I did a little
experiment on Mother’s Day. Apart from posting the
interview I did with my wife about the biases against and challenges of mothers in medicine,
I did a “Ask Me Anything” on Reddit, and for some
reason it went super viral and had over 270,000
interactions and views, and went to the top of the Reddit AMA. And that’s weird. I had
all these friends of mine, I haven’t talked to in
years who were texting me, “Hey, you’re Reddit famous.” I’m like, we have a million
followers on Facebook, but we do a Reddit AMA
and suddenly we’re famous? But, this idea, I think at
the top of the Reddit AMA was a comment about burnout, suicidality in medical professions and
that got the most up votes and generated a discussion. And people were tweeting, “Hey, ZDogg’s doing this AMA
on Reddit and you guys should check it out.” But I actually read it
and got very depressed because I realize how deep
the struggle is for frontline clinicians in the country
struggling with burnout, suicidality, mental illness
and completely stigmatized. And that made me think
we should really talk about this today. – [Tom] Like you said, I
grew up with a mother who’s severely mentally ill.
And I’ll tell you this, there’s no casserole coming to your house when your mother is mentally ill. But when your mother
has cancer or something, you are getting love and
support from the community. And it’s always this, like
weird thought of like, well, those people are mentally weak. It’s like, well, should I
call your genetic lineage biologically weak? Because
that’s what it seems like to me, if we’re gonna use the same logic. – You’re spot on. I
mean, this is a disease of an organ in the body … the mind. If you have heart disease,
they do GoFundMe campaigns. They do telethons. Jerry Lewis does telethons for kids with developmentally delay. Do you get the same
destigmatization with mental health? No, because people think
it’s a moral failing. It is not. And the truth is, look,
I’ve talked about this idea, because we’ve talked about meditation, we’ve talked about
mindfulness on the show before and my own sort journey down that path and how hard it is, and how
training your mind is hard. Now, imagine, we’ve talked
about these little sub-minds that process data and do emotions,
and have hopes and fears, and dreams. And the elephant
and the rider and all that. Imagine if you have a
sub-mind, or two, or three that don’t give up. They’re
constantly ruminating on horrible thoughts. They constantly are
projecting a self-image that is inaccurate, bad, hateful,
hurtful, filled with guilt and regret, and this is constantly on loop all the time. Then you put that person
in a healthcare environment where they’re getting
stimulus of the worst kind. Things that would give
a normal person PTSD, we see every single day,
including all the pressures from our colleagues,
administrators, and patients, and each other, and ourselves to perform better,
faster, more efficiently. And you put that kind of mind
that’s already struggling in that situation and it
is going to be a disaster. We have huge levels of
suicide and burnout. I re-posted an episode with
my mom, who is a psychiatrist talking about patients she’s
lost to suicide, to homicide, and how difficult that is. And, I’m telling you, she was
holding back on that episode. When she talks to me about
it, it’s even more candid and it’s so hard, right?
But we stigmatize all of it. If we treated the mind as
an organ, and as a disease process, but also, be
careful of over-medicalizing. So, we don’t want to throw
medications at everything. Sometimes really good
cognitive behavioral therapy, really good psychotherapy,
and just changing our environment, changing our
own personal way that we deal with things, that takes work. And it’s not necessarily a medication. It’s not drugging someone to death. And sometimes drugs are very important. We can’t lessen the importance of that, but this idea that we’re just
over-medicating everyone, that’s not the idea here. The idea is that we
destigmatize the disease. We find the best way to treat
that particular patient. For me, being a Type A neurotic
with OCD, I found meditation has been a tremendous thing
because I’m not severe enough to require medications. My own ADHD is mild enough
that, if I meditate I’m able to focus and practice attention
and peripheral awareness in a balance. And that works
for me, but it’s hard work, and I need support, and I need resources and that kind of thing. Now, imagine you’re working 12-hour shifts again and again and again. There’s no support.
There’s stigma everywhere. Everyone’s telling you to suck it up. And then you have the public stigma, where people like Margot
Kidder are treated as crazy. It’s a no-win situation. The title of this is “What We Can Do to Help Our Colleagues.” Step one is listen to them.
Destigmatize it. Make it okay to say I have a problem and I need help. Change our licensing stuff. Allow for support from
employment assistance programs, our employers, et cetera, to
have time to actually treat, manage, and prevent mental illness. And then start early, like
pre-meds for doctor types in nursing school and all
that to say that this is not something you’re alone. You can have support and we’re
gonna change our culture. But it’s gonna take a
lot of us to do that. – There was a book I read
awhile back, and it was called, “A First-rate Madness,” and
sort of the thesis of the book was that the best leaders
are somewhere on the spectrum of mental illness because
they have higher levels of empathy or caring and understanding because they themselves have suffered. – [Z] Right. And then it’s often when you find mentally healthy leaders are leaders – [Tom] who do the most
harm in a population. Think of somebody like a George Bush. – [Z] (laughs) – You know what I mean? Or a Donald Trump, who’s mentally healthy, – [Z] Right. at least at his own diagnosis. – Well and then that’s right,
the intersection of art, creativity and mental illness. – [Tom] Right. – The people who go into healthcare are pretty creative types. Like, I’ll tell you, our
second year class play was… The amount of creativity
that came out of this group of UCSF medical students,
who, by the way, listen, these are not balanced people. These are not people who are
coming in this with a high degree of mental stability. These are the cream of the
crop of gifted students who are neurotic. They are
driven. They are pushed. All these other things. Then you throw’em in a room. My first year at UCSF,
I remember thinking, am I back in high school? These crazy, intense cliques would form. Everybody’s hyper-competitive,
but pretending not to be hyper-competitive. There’s a big, sort of performance anxiety and posture syndrome and all those things. It’s enough to break the
healthiest person’s mind. Now, you take people who
are already at the edge of creativity, intelligence… We did a show with Blair
Duddy on gifted kids… These guys are already
right at the edge, right, they’re pushing the limits. And you can easily push
them over the edge. Now, we have two people at
NYU, two medical people, a student, I think, and a
resident who died by suicide in the last couple months,
and everyone’s acting like this is such a surprise. This is exactly the
system that we’ve built that’s gonna generate this. And the fact that we don’t talk about it. One of our goals here on this
platform is to give a platform to these topics that no
one wants to talk about, that we all know is happening,
but we need to put it out to the world so that muggles,
non-medical people see it. Our policy-makers see it,
and our academics and people on the front lines see
it and go, you know what, tomorrow I’m gonna do something different. Or at least, it’s in my sub-mind now, I’m gonna ruminate on this and we’re gonna come up with something. – I guess something that I’ve
though about, reflected on for a long time is, and
I’ve admitted to myself, is that I’m not in control of my thoughts, like you were saying. You
know, like, these thoughts just arise like something
would arise in my body if there was a physical
problem with my body. If there were mentally
unhealthy thoughts that were, maybe societally we viewed
them as mentally unhealthy, right, that wouldn’t be my
fault, that would just be something that was arising for me. – That’s a huge step towards
understanding the stigma of mental illness, that thoughts arise. And not only that, but
loops of thoughts arise. And anybody who meditates
at all can see this. You’re quiet, you quiet
your mind and you see them just arising, like, just
clouds across the sky. And that’s why there’s been
a lot of research, actually lately on psychedelics going
back to psilocybin, LSD, high dose psychedelics,
MDMA, which isn’t technically a psychedelic, but it’s
close, under guided conditions people can actually
almost reboot their mind. And these ruminatory
patterns of unbidden thoughts and ruminations can actually
be broken and you actually get a thirty-thousand-foot
view for the first time. It’s equivalent to meditating
in a cave for 30 years, you know, having a guided
psilocybin experience at high dose, at least to hear people who’ve done it’s explanation. – [Tom] It’s so interesting,
too, because it is cultural. We put them in a box as mentally ill. This is just, sort of, their
reality, and their experience as a human being and we’re
putting them over here in the box as like, no, you’re malfunctioning. There’s this shamanic tribe,
and I forget where it is, like Papua New Guinea, or
something, and their name for somebody who’s
schizophrenic is, “one who walks with the dolphins.” And it’s
like, what does that mean? I don’t know, but they’re a
society that takes a lot of psychedelic drugs. So they’re
like, this dude’s having visions, he must be touched by the gods. He must know something we don’t know. Let’s listen to him. And he’s
revered in their society. You know what I mean? – It’s a whole different framing. It’s a whole different framing. And you know, somewhere in the
West we lost a bit of touch with that sort of aspect of
the spiritual, creative aspect of what we’re calling mental illness. Now that doesn’t mean that… So if you have that mindset
it’s very hard to function in our current society. ‘Cause you can’t get things done. You can’t organize your
thoughts, and of course there’s the extreme. Margot Kidder said that
when she had this break she was wandering. She wandered
into Downtown Los Angeles and was taken in by a
couple of homeless people who recognized her as someone
who’s fellow mental illness, and took care of her and protected her. And it goes to show that
sometimes game recognize game. If you suffer yourself, your
level of empathy and acceptance of others who suffer may be higher. So we could all do a little bit with that. Now, I’m not a big fan of empathy because feeling someone’s pain… If you felt a schizophrenic’s
mind, you would not tolerate it for long, and it would
actually lead to yourself you would burn out. You would
make incorrect decisions. You would believe some of the delusions. That’s why family members
with high empathy of people with mental illness can
suffer something called folie a deux, where they
share some of the delusions of the mentally ill family member because the empathy is tight. – [Tom] There’s a condition
tied to schizophrenia called allophrenia, where
you can actually start to hallucinate, yourself. – [Z] Ah. Interesting. And the idea, again is that
we are very suggestible, and that our mind is complex, and it is consisted of sub-minds
that are always feeding our awareness this data. We can improve those things. Medications, therapy, cognitive
therapy, talk therapy, just getting out of certain environments, set and setting. That’s why people who used
to drop acid in the 60’s sometimes would just have
horrible things happen because their set and setting was bad. In other words, their
mindset was bad going in, so now they’re open to
all this crazy stuff, and their setting, where they
were was not a non-paranoid inducing sort of setting. But in guided settings
with the right mindset, these might, we’re seeing
evidence that these drugs might help us understand even
the nature of mental illness and how the mind works. There’s a lot to do. So, Tom Hinueber, other thoughts? – Well, taking it back
to medical practitioners, there’s a lot of things that
are considered mentally healthy or normal, like staying up all night, – [Z] (laughs) – Or just clicking through
these boxes, never asking why you’re doing any of it. Shoving your own compassion,
empathy deep within yourself to just do the thing you need
to do to get through your day. And then we’re surprised when
people burn out and break. These are not normal behaviors. – [Z] We’ve set people
up in healthcare to fail. You know, there was a guy on Rogan, the sleep specialist from Berkeley, – [Tom] Right. Yeah, and he talked
about the origins of why residents stay up all night
can be traced to a doctor in the 1800’s who was a
cocaine addict and expected all his residents to keep pace with him. So he would stay up for 36 hours
’cause he was high on coke, and he expected his residents
to keep up with him. So the culture was set then
by a cocaine-addicted doctor, which is a mental illness in itself. Cocaine dependency is in the
DSM-5, right, as a disease. You’re now expecting
medical students to behave in this model, and it
persists to this day. Things are slowly changing, but we have to change them faster. Uh, what do you think, Tom Hinueber? – Cocaine’s a helluva drug. – It’s a helluva drug. – [Z] Cocaine is a helluva
drug. Charlie Murphy. So, guys, this is what you can
do to help raise awareness. First of all, people
who’ve donated to NAMI, the National Alliance on
Mental Illness, $230 raised from eight people. Thank you. Keep clickin’ that box. Do me a favor, hit “Share” on this thing. Share it with someone you care about. Frame it a certain way, like, “We need to destigmatize this.” That will go a long way. It also helps Facebook’s
algorithm to realize that our content is good and
just and needs to be shared, and helps it disseminate. I don’t know, ZPAC, we love you. Thank you for supporting
our AMA on Reddit, everything we do on Facebook, and for being a part of the tribe. Also, Logan just created a
“Make Medicine Great Again” line of merchandise. So, if you want to support our videos, go to shop.ZDogg.MD.com and
make medicine great again. I don’t know, Tom Hinueber,
what do you think? – There isn’t a single mental
illness that’s a weakness. They’re just a condition
in the human experience. – Normally the show ends with, “I hate you so much, Tom Hinueber,” but it’s hard to hate
you for saying something that actually makes sense, for a change. I hate Logan so much. – [Tom] He walks with the dolphins. – You dance with chickens, Logan Stewart. – [Logan] I do. I do, Z. – I love you, ZPAC. We out. (hi hop music) – What? Dancing with
chickens isn’t like, a thing? – [Logan] Gotta dance with chickens, Z. – I’d dance with… I’d
do the chicken dance. (hip hop music) – [Z] By the way, have you seen my… – Have you seen these? I walk around talking to
myself, wearing these, talking to Steve Jobs’ ghost. – [Tom] That’s a behavior
that’s considered normal that may not be.

Holistically Managing Mental Illness | Rick & Kay Warren


Kay: You may have just been diagnosed with
a mental illness, or you may have a family member who has just been diagnosed, and yet
your mind is full of thoughts. You might even be a little frightened, because that’s an
overwhelming diagnosis. We want to talk to you in this, about how to manage a mental
illness from a holistic perspective. Probably the very first thing from this diagnosis is,
your psychiatrist may have said to you that adding medication may be the very first thing
that you need to do. Taking medication for a mental illness, that can be very frightening.
You don’t know how you’re going to feel, you don’t know how it’s going to make you act,
you don’t know is it going to change you. It can really be a frightening thing.
Rick: Yeah, and as a pastor who studied the Bible for over 40 years, I can tell you this,
it’s not a sin to be sick. It’s not a sin to take medication. In fact, a lot of people
think that … they’re ashamed of taking medicine. Well, why? If my heart doesn’t work and I
take heart medicine; there’s no shame in that. If my liver doesn’t work and I take liver
medicine; there’s no shame in that. If my brain isn’t working work and I take medicine
for my brain; there’s no shame in that. There’s no stigma to that, it’s just part of being
a human being and living in a broken world. Kay: That’s what we want to talk about, is
how to manage mental illness in a holistic way. Sometimes people think if they go and
they get a diagnosis and somebody says, “Okay, here’s the illness that you have. Here’s the
medication that you have, and we also want you to involved in therapy.” Sometimes we
can think that that’s all that’s necessary. Sometime that’s good, sometimes taking medication
and being in weekly therapy dealing with your mind and dealing with your thoughts, is incredibly
… Rick: Your emotions.
Kay: Your emotions, is incredibly helpful, but that’s not all. You’re going to need to
work in some other area. There’s some other things that are going to add benefit to you
managing a mental illness. Rick: Yeah, you might even take it in layers.
You might start at the most basic level, which biological, and that is what’s wrong in my
body that needs some medicine. Then what’s wrong in my thinking that maybe needs some
straightening out of the way that I think. Of course, a good counselor can help you on
that. The Bible says, in the multitude of counselors
there is safety. In other words, it is wise to get advice from other people. People see
things that we don’t see. They can also help us interpret experiences in our life, like
trauma, abuse, difficulties that we’re been unable to even think about ourselves.
Kay: You mentioned physically, that things can go wrong inside our bodies that can lead
to mental illness. Also, there are things that you can do to control what happens in
your body. Meaning you and I are totally in control of how much sleep we get. You and
I are … Rick: Right.
Kay: Totally in control of how we eat. There are things you can adjust, your diet. Maybe
there’s some foods you need to cut, maybe there’s some food … if you’re just eating
Ho-Ho’s and coke every day for breakfast, there’s a good chance that’s probably not
going to help your mental health or your physical health. Really take a look seriously at what
you’re eating, how much sleep you’re getting, how much rest, how much physical activity.
When you add that physical component, it will have an effect on your mental health.
Rick: What we’re saying is that no mental health issue is simple; they’re all complex.
There’s a biological component that maybe require medicine, there is a physiological
component that could involve rest, exercise, and taking care of your body. There is a thought
component, which can involve helping interpret the experiences of life that make your illness
either worse or better. Then of course their relationships. Relationships have a profound
effect on our lives. Good relationships help us cope better with the natural problems we
have, bad relationships make it worse. Kay: Yeah, and we’ve found, because our son
lived with a mental illness for a very, very long time. In our family, and in our relationships,
we found that sometimes the relationship became strained; that mental illness caused there
to be some chaos, caused there to be some relationships that just didn’t work well.
As you’ve maybe just been diagnosed or you are a family member of somebody has, one of
the aspects in learning to manage mental illness in a holistic way is to approach relationships.
There may be some relationship repair that needs to happen, that will help you or help
your family member, as you guys cope with this diagnosis; this sometimes very frightening
diagnosis. We’re talking about what you can do take …
Rick: Let me say about that too. If you are a loved one of someone who’s struggling with
mental illness, and they have isolated you or they have had conflict with you or whatever
strain in the relationship; don’t take it personal.
Kay: Yeah, that reminds me. One of the best pieces of advice that we ever got, in helping
our son and in our family relationships, was to not take it personally and to listen to
the music, not just the words. Sometimes people who have mental illness say terrible things.
Let’s be honest, sometimes people, especially if they’re in a particular episode or if they’re
in a moment in which they’re struggling. Rick: They’re in pain.
Kay: They’re in deep pain, and they will say things, or you will say things that later
you go, “Why did I say that? I don’t mean that. These are people I love.” For us as
family members, we learned not to take it personally, to listen to what is, to what
his heart was not necessarily what his words were. That was a huge piece of advice for
us. Relationships in managing mental illness will have to addressed and helped.
Rick: Of course your relationship to God is a very important factor. The spiritual component
in mental illness, God has power that nobody else has. The Bible tells us that Jesus has
healing power in his words and in his life. Many years ago, probably 30 years ago, I went
through an entire year of depression. When I was going through that depression, one of
the many things I did, I took some medication, I went to see a therapist. I also read through
the Book of Psalms. As I read through the Book of Psalms, I underlines every verse that
had to do with depression or was a word on encouragement to me. I still have that Bible
30 years later. When I know someone who is discourage, somebody is going through a tough
time; I’ll often open that Bible and flip to those exact verses that helped me through
those painful days. Kay: Yeah, I would say if you are the person
who has just been diagnosed with mental illness or your family member, we cannot over-emphasize
how you’ve got to build yourself spiritually. There is a spiritual aspect and a spiritual
component. To be able to have a group, maybe just … maybe there’s just two or three verses,
you don’t have to have the whole Bible. You’ve got two or three verses that you can hang
onto in those moments when you’re feeling very low or the pain is so deep.
I don’t there’s a place in the Psalm’s, where the psalm says, “Darkness is my only companion.”
The people in the Bible, who wrote the Bible, really understand depression, understand pain.
Jesus understands it. Not only do you need to have that spiritual strength for yourself,
but line up some people who will pray for you. Some people who will promise, who will
commit to you that they will pray. There is this spiritual aspect that you’ve got to manage,
as we holistically manage mental illness. Rick: Part of the spiritual component in managing
mental illness, is to hold onto the promises of God. There are over 7,000 promises in the
Bible. I was talking to someone the other day who was struggling with schizophrenia.
He said, “The promise I will never leave you. I will never forsake you.” He said, “Got
him through his darkest days.” Those promises are there, that you could hold on to when
you can’t believe everything you think. You can’t believe everything you see, but you
can believe everything God says to you. The more you understand how much God loves you
unconditionally, that he sees, he cares, he knows, he grieves, and he can help; these
are the spiritual components that you need to hold onto.
Kay: Yeah. Just remember that you are not just your mind, you’re not even just your
emotions; you are a whole-being. You are a body, a soul, and a spirit. To manage mental
illness, don’t overwhelmed by it. Just … but to go after this approach to manage it with
medication, through therapy, through your body, how you take care of your body, the
relationships that may need to strengthened. Absolutely, at the very bottom line, is strengthening
your relationship with God. He is the best person of all to help you manage.

Brain Injury: Intro to TBI Information and Crashing Minds

Brain Injury: Intro to TBI Information and Crashing Minds


Hello, my name is Gordon Johnson. You are
now on tbilaw.com, which is a webpage that I have had on the Internet since 1996. This
video is now being shot at a time that I have changed the title of tbilaw.com from the Brain
Injury Information page to Crashing Minds. Why the title Crashing Minds? Well Crashing
Minds is a book that I have been writing for the last couple years and it seemed like it
was time to incorporate some of the themes of that book in TBILaw.com which has hundreds
and hundreds of pages of information on it since I put it up in the mid 1990s. I use
the term crashing minds because the brain in a brain injury does crash in similar ways
to what your computer might do if you in fact overload it and/or did something to make it
crash. Now there’s no comparison to the devastation of a brain injury to a computer crash, but
as we begin to understand the way in which computers work, the average person now knows
what RAM is and a hard drive is, it becomes easier for me to explain similar processes
that happen inside the brain when there’s a brain injury. I’m not a doctor, I’m a lawyer. I’ve been
writing about brain injury virtually my entire career as a personal injury lawyer. These
pages have information I’ve learned on them , both when undertook the massive undertaking
to really understand brain injury when I became a brain injury specialist, but also what I’ve
learned from listening to you, the people with brain injury, my clients, loved ones,
family members of my clients, and the things that I’ve learned in the years of doing battle
with doctors who were hired by defense and insurance companies to basically deny that
anything we know to be true could be true. Tbilaw.com is really not like anything you’re
going to read in a medical book. It does have medical science as its primary basis, but
it’s not written like a doctor would write for another doctor, and it’s not written like
a brain injury survivor would write for another brain injury survivor. The goal is to combine
a technical understanding of brain injury with the communication skills both written
and verbal that I have developed in my career as both a journalist and a writer and also
as a lawyer, but to combine those things in a way where I can teach, I can inform, and
I can advocate. We hope that these pages are self-accrediting
to you that you will see yourselves, you will see your loved ones in these pages and through
them you will in fact get a better sense of what is ahead and what it is that you need
to learn, you need to do, to ensure the best recovery for you or your loved one. Throughout our web advocacy we have seen three
basic themes that come up. The questions come up over and over again. The first is someone
is in a coma, their loved one is in a coma, and the doctors are all saying, the only information
the doctors are giving is that you will just have to wait and see. Well predicting the
outcome of a coma while someone is still in a coma is a very very difficult thing to do,
there is legitimate information, and it’s a very important time for the family member
to learn as much as possible about brain injury. The second theme is that you suffered a concussion,
your family member had suffered a concussion, and the doctors are saying everything’s going
to be better, and when you are a week after the concussion, a month after the concussion,
that’s what you want to hear, and it may in fact be the case, but for a significant minority
of people, 10 to 15 percent of the people, that may not be the case, and the doctor’s
advice that everything will go away, don’t worry, you’ll be fine in six months, isn’t
always true, and for the significant subset, the significant minority of people, there
needs to be more information, there needs to be more assistance and more focus has to
be beyond long-term recovery and we’ve tried to address that issue. The third major issue is what is almost a
complete devoid of information about the long-term potential disability that can come either
after a severe brain injury or after concussion. In the concussion cases it is obvious why
that information isn’t given; because in concussion cases the doctors don’t think there could
be any disability, but remarkably there’s still very little information given about
the long-term consequences, long-term behavioral changes after a severe brain injury. In the
severe brain injury case there is this huge focus of care and attention in the first 90
days; hopefully it extends out for a year, but once you’ve gotten away from the neurosurgeon’s
care, once you’re outside of the requisite number of speech pathology visits or physical
therapy visits, then there’s very very little done given information provided and focus
on long-term recovery. We started a project called TBI Voices a little over two years
ago and we’ve offered almost daily installments of the voices of people who survived injury,
primarily severe injury, and what their life was like as they went through it and what’s
it’s like now. We are creating new pages as we go that incorporates what we’ve learned
from listening to the TBI stories on TBI voices to help people understand the future impact
of brain injury. To help them understand the long-term symptoms that they may suffer. We hope that you click on it. We hope that
you find what you need here. We hope that you will come back. We hope that you will
use tbilaw.com, crashing minds, as your troubleshooting guide for the challenges that are ahead for
those with brain injury.

Ready to Race Series: Stress Fracture

Ready to Race Series: Stress Fracture


If you suddenly change your training volume, in particular you are really changing the type of surface you are running on, those things can create some really significant consequences. So stress fractures are really an overuse injury now involving the bone. And the bone, once it accumulates a certain amount of stress it has a hard time healing itself in some cases. Essentially what happens is as your muscles fatigue and they can’t absorb the force that they need to during running that stress gets transmitted to your bone. And bone is made of protein, to some extent, but also a lot of calcium, which is hard. And so, once it starts to break, if it keeps on getting stressed in the wrong way, it has a very hard time healing itself. There’s often focal tenderness, Sharp pain that’s often much more focal than I mentioned in the shin, at least. Having swelling is common. And then some of the things you can do are things like what’s called “Hop Test” so you can kind of hop up and down on that one leg, and typically that won’t be painful. But if you are getting that sharp, typical pain when you’re hitting the ground, that’s not a good sign. There’s been studies that look when you are under tremendous psychological stress, changes in cortisol levels, or your ability to heal and all this kind of stuff. But more so it’s important for you to just keep in mind that you need to maintain adequate nutrition, make sure that you are getting a good amount of protein, and just overall calories to allow your body to heal itself. Key with this is making sure that if you do start to feel anything that sounds like this you really need to stop your training and not joke around with it. Because it can progress and cause major problems. If you do have a stress fracture and you’re in that case where walking isn’t painful and the only thing that you have trouble with is running, we can get you in an AlterG and take up to 70 percent of your body weight off so that you can still run and train as your tissues heal in a pain-free fashion so you don’t have to take time off from this.

Your Illness is Not Your Fault

Your Illness is Not Your Fault


good morning John I’m still sick this is annoying the thing that I’ve noticed now that I’ve had this happening for like two weeks is that when you are sick people give you advice I’ve actually noticed this for years when it comes to my ulcerative colitis a lot of people seem to have a cure in their back pocket if only I’d go gluten free or stop eating grains or palio or vegan or stop eating short train carbohydrates or fast for three days and then eat an apple seriously it was a whole thing and it took like half the party for him to explain it to me and over the years I’ve tried a lot of those things and none of them worked what worked was taking the medicine that my doctor gave to me and then over the past week people have been saying completely normal things to me like get some rest man or take it easy stop stressing sleep more and I’ve been a little bit shocked by how annoying this is not because it is annoying like its fine It’s a totally fine thing for somebody to say but it’s tapping into this thing that I have with my ulcerative colitis after years of dealing with my chronic illness that I can not cure and having people tell me ways that I should be able to cure it what I’m hearing is not, you know ‘take it easy, we support you’ instead I’m hearing: ‘I have the secret to your wellness and If only ‘you had the courage and fortitude to implement it, you would no longer be sick’ and one step further from that whats tickling by subconscious here is this idea that my illness is my fault I know that my chronic illness is pretty insignificant compared with what a lot of other people are dealing with but I think this is probably an experience that a lot of people have when you tell me, a person who has lived with ulcerative colitis for more than a decade that you have the secret to my wellness I can not help but dislike you like if that’s my first impression, and sometimes it is I’m like ‘I’m out’ and look maybe this is the one weird instance in which you are the one who was right and maybe I’m missing that opportunity to finally make myself better but I’ve heard this line so many times with so many different facts and so many different pieces of anecdotal evidence that all I can hear when people say this to me is ‘your illness is your fault’ because we want it to be somethings fault, right? because if its not the fault of anything, then it has to be just weird random chance and that’s what chronic illness is it just freaking happens to good people and bad people and champion athletes and people who drink to much I’ve dealt with my illness by allowing myself to accept it by admitting to myself and accepting that my life is different now and my body is different now and I have to live inside of this body that sometimes hurts itself science will keep marching forward and someday maybe there will be a medicine that I can take that will control this disease without making me sick in other ways and yes, science shows that my behaviour does influence the expression of my disease and so does my experience of my disease and so I do need support from people that help me make the decisions that my doctor says that I should make and that I have decided for myself that I want to make but I also can’t avoid the truth that this is the body that I’m in and I have to accept that like among the many probabilities that were cast, that mostly came up in my favour I rolled bad on auto-immune diseases my brain tried to tell me over and over again that this is my fault I have searched for every possible way subconsciously and consciously that this is a thing that I did to myself and that’s a crappy feeling and its re-emphasized every time someone tells me that there’s a simple thing that I can do to make myself well I want to say here at the end of this video I’m doing fine, I’m not angry or frustrated at my friends or at you I have a loving and supportive group of people who are fantastic in my life and I do my best to understand that when people are saying these things they’re not trying to make me feel what I’m feeling so I just try and accept that support for what it is rather than how it’s being expressed specifically but if you want to be supportive of someone who’s sick in your life make sure that you recognise that it’s very possible that they are struggling right now with this feeling that they did something to cause or to deserve the illness they have even if objectively they understand that that’s completely untrue when we say there is an easy way out of this and there’s not what we’re making people feel is that ‘this is your fault’ when it’s not. John, I’ll see you on tuesday

Florida Car Crash: Hip Fracture & Aseptic Necrosis

Florida Car Crash: Hip Fracture & Aseptic Necrosis


Hi! I’m Dave Glatthorn, I’m an
attorney in West Palm Beach exclusively representing injured
people. I want to tell you a story of a case I had a few
years ago, involving a very unusual injury – and diagnosis
actually – to a gentleman. This gentleman had been in a car
crash, and from the time of the crash – which was a big impact –
he had made complaints not only to his neck and back, but also
to his hip. Well, his history was that about two years before
this accident, he had fallen off a ladder while he was putting up
a basketball net. And the doctor that treated him was very
concerned, because when you break a large bone like that –
what can happen is – the blood vessel inside the bone can get
disrupted and the bone can actually die. You might have
heard the story of Bo Jackson. He had what’s called aseptic
necrosis, where his bone in his hip was actually dying. Well,
the doctor that treated him was very concerned about this and
was, made sure he did not develop this aseptic necrosis.
Now two years later – fast forward to two years later – he
gets into a car accident, has complaints about pain in the
hip. The doctors take x-rays, they don’t see anything. But,
what happens is aseptic necrosis takes at least a year to develop
– so, that you can see on MRIs. And about a year afterwards,
after his constant complaints, they did an MRI that actually
showed the aseptic necrosis. But what was fascinating was is that
the insurance doctor that was hired to examine this gentleman
looked at the MRIs but did not recognize the aseptic necrosis.
So, it was no where in his report, and when I got him on
the stand at trial, he had to admit that, “No, I didn’t even
see that when I examined it.” So, that gives you an example
– really – of how much effort these people put into trying
to give a fair evaluation. If you’ve been involved in an
automobile accident in Florida, the insurance companies will not
hesitate to go out and get the testimony they need to try and
defeat your claim. You’re going to have questions, you’re going
to have some concerns, and you’re going to need help.
Call me, we can answer your questions, we can help you,
we can address your concerns. 561-659-1999. I’m Dave
Glatthorn, thanks for watching!

Causes of Spinal Compression Fractures

Causes of Spinal Compression Fractures


>Gentlemen, we have a graphic let’s take
it right now if we can and walk us through it.
Number one is not surprising at all, osteoporosis. Doctor Geronimo’s.>Yes.
Osteoporosis brings it makes up the bulk of these fractures, you know, there’s over
ten million patients with osteoporosis and in the United States annually and
it’s it’s really the risk factors for osteoporosis are age gender women are
significantly more prone and at a younger age your bone mineral density
certain medications there’s a lot that goes into it. By far
osteoporosis is your biggest risk factor for the cubic compresion.>I know for
women that time of menopause is also very critical where you lose a lot of
bone mass, right?>Absolutely. We do know that it is it is Astrid independent
unfortunately they’ve done studies where with estrogen replacement it actually
does not help. They found that the risk outweigh the benefits of using
the estrogen for bone density.>All right and we have two more on that graphic
which would want to show our viewers real quick, the next one was trauma, I
believe, and then the third one finally was pathologic compression fracture.
Would you like to chime in on that Dr.?>So trauma is very, very common. Actually
patients that have just minor Falls it’s considered that the patient has had a
trauma. Especially in patients that are osteoporotic if they have a fall that
trauma can really can result in some significant compression fractures and
results in severe pain. I’ve actually had younger patients that have had have had
real traumas such as automobile accidents, boating accidents actually
have one patient that came in with a plane accident one time I’d had a
compression fracture as a result of that.

Frog Diseases And Prevention, How To Prevent Common Illnesses In Your Frog

Frog Diseases And Prevention, How To Prevent Common Illnesses In Your Frog


hey y’all as many from my hectic life
and today we’re going to talk about preventable diseases in frogs many
species of frogs are kept as pets all over the world most frogs tend to be
considered a beginner pet and are relatively easy to care for they tend to
be pretty party but like all pets they can be susceptible to certain diseases
if you find that you have any health concerns about your pet frog
you should definitely contact your veterinarian just to make sure
everything’s all right but most diseases that frogs tend to get
are usually pretty easy to prevent so of course there’s metabolic bone disease
metabolic bone disease is caused typically from a lack of calcium in the
diet since all its own disease is an easy prevention as sensitives just
caused by a lack of vitamin d3 and a lack of calcium frequently a calcium
vitamin d3 supplement every other feeding can help prevent this disease
from happening smile also disease causes soft bones and problems with jobs where
your amphibian won’t be able to another easy fix for this can be the addition of
a UVB light if your frog is compatible with UVB the albino type species and
things cannot cannot handle a lot of extra lighting so make sure that you do
research whether or not your pet can handle a UVB light if they can’t then of
course a calcium vitamin d3 supplement every other feeding is recommended for
your frog another disease that is common among frogs can be toxic out
in German brought a very sensitive skin and they absorb pretty much anything
around them they absorb water through their skin and so if you are not
changing their water bowl frequently and making sure that you’re using two
chlorinated water then they can develop toxic out syndrome signs of this illness
can be spastic jumping cloudy eyes and listless limb even things like smoking
around your frog handling your frogs too much the oils of our skin can be very
dangerous for frogs if they’re exposed to it too much these can all contribute
to toxic out syndrome as well as just keeping there how to Pat well clean and
maintenance and making sure that they get their water change regularly I know
my frogs tend to go to the bathroom in their bowls and so we really don’t want
them sitting and soaking in their own urine and feces infested water certain
illness that we could talk about is parasite so to help prevent your frog
from getting parasites it’s simple to make sure that you’re not feeding any
outside insects that you’re only feeding insects that were bred for the purposes
of feeding and life that were bred for the purposes of feeding and not
something that you caught outside in a field another typical problem of frogs
can be impaction frosting and impacted by accidentally consuming unsafe
substrate if you’re using things like gravel or a moth you want to just be
very careful because if the Frog is eating and they accidentally ingest a
rock or they ingest some of them all these things can cause impaction you
want to make sure that whatever substrate you’re using and
keeping your cane is going to be something that’s safer your frog and I
are too large for them to even try to ingest or small enough it can easily
pass through their system so it won’t cause any obstruction another common
problem found in frogs can be obesity most frog species are gluttonous big
heavy-duty eaters especially if you own something like a Pac Man frog
they will eat themselves almost to death they will disgorge themselves full food
obesity can be a huge problem among frogs if we don’t keep an eye on how
much we are feeding and how often our eating I try to stay on a schedule that
way I know when to feed my frogs and how much according to how large they are if
you do notice that your frog is starting to get kind of fat and starting to have
a harder time moving around you’re probably going to want to either cut
back on feeding either you’re feeding too often or you’re eating too much at
one time so if that case then you’re just going to want to cut back on that a
little bit another huge problem that we see among frogs can be dehydration
dehydration is probably the easiest thing to prevent making sure that in
your frog habitat you’re maintaining proper humidity levels making sure that
you’re spraying down your pain using the chlorinated water and making sure that
you’re providing plenty of fresh water for them every day if you’re doing all
this then your frog more than likely will never have any kind of problems
with dehydration unless there’s another underlying cause another illness that
can cause problems with your frog is gastric overloads if you see your
product something that is too large for them to handle or sometimes if you
be too much at one time in one seating they can sometimes get captured
overloads which can cause a lot of bloating a lot of discomfort in your
frogs and can put pressure on their lungs and other organs that can cause
them a lot of problems long term so you always want to make sure that you’re not
feeding anything too large to your frogs and you’re not over feeding your frogs
too much in one feeding because again most of them have a pretty voracious
appetite and they can overeat and it can make them very ill so we always want to
monitor how much you’re feeding your frogs and how much you should be feeding
your frog in one sitting and how often this will help prevent making sure that
they don’t ever end up with gastric overload so the last one that I want to
talk about is hypothermia and heatstroke now hypothermia is a lot more common
than heatstroke but it is so easy for Venice for hypothermia you just don’t
want the Frog take temperatures to fall below a comfortable level several
difference between the broad sort of temperature range is usually between 65
and 80 degrees some can go a little bit higher than this but overall you want to
make sure that for your species of frog that you’re keeping their tank
temperatures at the correct low you don’t want them to be fluctuating too
much too quickly and you want to make sure that your frogs are always warm
enough now on the opposite side of the spectrum for heatstroke for areas like
where I live where it can get to be 115 degrees outside on a regular basis in
summer if you don’t believe in your air conditioner then that can also be a huge
problem for in frost so you want to make sure that you are keeping your frog in a
cooler area in your house if you do have problems with over keys for keeping your
tanks warm there are all kinds of things in the winter like there’s all kinds
different products out there ceramic heat lamps heating mats that you can put
under the tank or even attach to the side of something and of course there’s
heat lamps like your day and night basking bulbs that can also provide
warmth to your tank depending on what type of species that you have and what
they do best with like the patent and frogs and my tree frogs do better with
either a ceramic heating lamp or a under or an under the tank mass but other
species made you better with a basking bulb it just depends on how sensitive
your it just depends on how sensitive your species of frogs that you’re
keeping as a pet is too light so of course there are still other diseases
that your frogs can get I mean there are viral infections and fungal infections
and bacterial infections that are not very easy to prevent but overall a lot
of these diseases are very preventable so armed with this knowledge you can
have a frog that will have a much longer lifespan and be a lot happier and
healthier overall so that’s all for today’s video you found this information
useful please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to my channel where I put
videos like this every week thanks for watching guys five you

Back Massage Therapy How to for Sciatica Pain Relief Treatment, Cranio-Sacral Techniques


Greetings again! This is Athena Jezik. We’re gonna work on some more videos and explain
some things out. Sciatica seems to be a problem that many
many people suffer from so i thought i would go through a little bit more sciatica work and explanation on how i deal with
sciatica. There’s many different techniques that people have but for me
this has been the most effective and i’m also learning that there’s
different types of things that come from that area. Sciatica usually is pain coming from
about here. When it’s real bad it will run down the leg. It’s a nerve pain so it runs as though it’s a like a hot iron or a hot rod going down the leg. Very uncomfortable. Sometimes there’s pain though in other parts of the hip which isn’t really the classic sciatica but it does still involve things similar because there’s so many nerves that come out of this sacral area. So that’s another thing that i’ve been
discovering. So not everything that happens with the pain and going down the leg is maybe the classic sciatica but it doesn’t matter because in my opinion naming a lot of things
doesn’t really do anything except for make it a disease and then a disease is only by law treatable by the western medical people. So that’s just names and labels. The thing is
we want to get people out of pain. We want to move them into a space of
being able to function well. So in that pain area of the hip impinging nerves and creating bad
sensation or pain down the leg we’ll call that the sciatica pain and of course it comes from here
and I find that it is always got a direct connection to the
positioning of the sacrum that also has a direct connection to the
position of the sphenoid bone at the occipital base and I’m gonna show you a little bit of this… I’ll just show it to you now. Excuse me it’s early in the morning and I’m kind of foggy today. So the sacrum is sitting here and in that sacral bone there is a lot of nerves that come out from here. These little holes are where they come
out of so if that is position a little bit
crooked on there, which happens quite a bit then we’re gonna have this pressure. The nerves are not going to be coming
out with the proper alignment and the nerves are gonna have pressure on them when they are twisted a little bit. sometimes this bone can be in a
position that’s a little more like this or it can also be an a combination of
that particular pattern so it’s important to be able to allow this bone to be able to lengthen down. This is something better done if the body can do it itself. If it’s forced into it, it doesn’t always mean that it’s going to hold because there’s a bunch of stuff
underneath there. The network of the facial structure,
the membranes under that that will twist like a nylon stocking and so if it’s forced back it will go back but because of the
underlying structures there it will pull it back into that odd position. This is translating up into the head and
because I’m a cranial sacral therapist and I’ve been doing it for so many
years I have a lot of understanding how these connections are made. So right in there where the purple and the yellow come
together is the sphenobasilar junction. The sphenoid bone is the yellow bone right here and so that bone touches all the other
bones and it does relate directly to the sacrum at this joint. So if this sacral structure is sideways, crooked on there, that’s going to be placed and it’s going to be
like so The same thing is gonna happen at at the head.
This sphenoid bone is going to be out in a similar manner because it’s a counterbalance for what’s
going on with the body. So it keeps things balanced so that we feel somewhat straight. So that’s areas that I look for in work around low back pain particularly down in the sacral area. I do not like to do the hard pushing with the elbow. For one thing You can get through muscles that way but your elbows are not very sensitive as to what you’re really doing and what structures
you’re on and i have found that when i’ve tried to
work elbows even forearms the bones and the bony surfaces.. it’s just too rough.
I don’t feel good about it. It doesn’t feel productive so I don’t
use that method. Also sometimes when the nerve is affected there’s inflammation. So in
my opinion the way that I see things is by driving yourself into that nerve, through those muscles with a bunch
of inflammation going on is not really going to help the problem. So there’s little things like that that I pay attention to that I don’t know if many other people take a lot of
that into account because we do get sort of a technique
to loosen things up and it doesn’t always provide for us the thoughts of what’s
happening at the subtle anatomy level. So I test this just by checking at
the occipital base and at the sacrum to see the position of everything and once the position is established then I can go in and work with the sacrum
in order to correct it. Sometimes this will be corrected quickly
and sometimes it’s not corrected as quickly and I believe that a lot of that is
because it’s maybe not a true quote “sciatica” but there’s other
stuff going on maybe in the hip joint. There might be some kind of misalignment
in the pubic arch. There might be some kind of a rotation in the hip as well so other things have to happen. So here I’m just giving a little drag on the sacrum and letting it loosen up and letting it
swim around and my other hand is at the occipital base. Just steadying the dural tube. And so there I just wait a little while and then I will soften the muscle area around
there. I work really differently. It just kind of depends. So much of my work is intuitive. There’s
somewhat of a protocol that I follow but each person presents things
differently. No two bodies are ever the same. No injury patterns are ever the same. So flexibility is important to be able
to move from various techniques and not follow things too rigidly particularly in pain
problems and issues Then the other thing that i will do is
to get my finger at the base of the sacrum… Excuse me, at L5 S1, which is right in this area here L5 S1 so try to put some distance between there
because that’s where the jamming probably tends to be. Sometimes it’s at the coccyx. And I’ll show you that technique as well. So with that you just do a little
stretching integrating in with the muscles integrating in with the tissues and then just waiting for it to move. This is going face down. There is a better way to do the sacral pull when they are on their back but this way will also open it up. Either way is fine and my other hand
up here is also feeling some rotation and some movement coming up the spine. So as one area of the spine is off every
little vertebrae is affected to some degree. There’s a little bit of adjustment that they
have to make in order to keep the misalignment aligned and the bodies just gonna do that it’s
gonna work within the framework that it has and it’s gonna normalize whether a pattern
is there. And so there now we’re getting it softened
and now there’s a little bit of a stretch happening. I’m stretching downward with the hand
that’s on the L5 S1. And I am taking a little bit of a stretch upward. Just a little traction. No deeper than the fascial level. So we have skin, fluid, then fascia. So I’m three layers down and giving a little stretch there and i’m feeling quite a bit of rumbling
going on and there is a separation happening between L5 S1 And it just swims around and the sacrum is trying right now to find its way back to the proper position. It’s a good idea, if you know cranial
work to also balance it at the spenoid level because the sphenoid bone, if not corrected, can pull this thing out. Sometimes this
will correct the sphenoid bone but it’s a good idea to check both. She just had a couple pulses. There’s
a lot of activity going on. Even though she’s not suffering from sciatica or any kind of hip serious pain problems there’s still a
lot of activity going on, which is correcting little misalignments in there, which is a reason that we should be paying attention to maintenance. Even though we’re not hurting, we might
wanna have some kind of session just for tweaking. I see a number of people who come in regularly every four to six weeks just to be
tweaked with cranial work And I myself have an hour and a half
session with somebody once a month. And I love it when I get it. It took me a while to find somebody that I felt was at my capacity. Okay and then the other position is just
to lay the hand on the sacrum here and curl the fingers at L5 S1
and give a little bit of traction this way. This is a little tricky because you have
to keep the palm of the hand pretty secure and the fingers have to bend so there’s quite a lot of technique in the hands in order to get the right feeling. And the
hands have to work independently because I’m right at the sacral coccyx junction and I’m stretching
downward on that while I’m allowing the movement, which is a little
bit of a swaying motion at L5 S1.
There’s a downward traction as well as this being loose to be able to align. at the same time it’s being tractioned downward. Okay and there’s some movement happening. These techniques will usually give quite a
bit of change to the pain. It doesn’t mean that one time is going
to give total remedy to the problem but it does begin to correct that space. Once that’s corrected then we can go in
and also work into the muscles, much deeper into the musculature. And the only reason i work into the
musculature is to loosen the muscles so that they’re not sinching down around those
nerves because if they are sinching around those nerves then they are not gonna let go really easy even though the
alignment happens so i just worked really deeply into these glutial muscles for the purpose of the muscle again, not the purpose of the nerve. And I’m careful if I go into the
area where the sciatic is the main place where you can feel it. I do not go into that with a lot of
deep pressure because again I don’t like going into the inflamed areas and I don’t like going
into pain with a lot of pressure. I don’t think in my work it gives me the better results. Okay and then up front and there is many areas of the hip to take and loosen. And along the ridge of the hip as well coming from the sacrum. Working all that. And of course both sides are benefited. I won’t do too much on this side. Both sides have benefited by that. You can even go into the attachments of
the hamstrings. In fact it’s a good idea to make sure
that the quadriceps and hamstrings are well stretched. With this there’s also
some stretches that can be done with the leg, but I will show that at another time So basically what i do is corrected the position of the sacrum to alleviate the pain of the sciatic pain or hip pain. Thank you very much! This is Athena Jezik. Please subscribe to our channel and you should also visit our new website because we have over 1300 videos on our channel I know it can be a little difficult to navigate and find the videos that you want to see
but if you visit us at Psychetruth.net you’ll be able to find the videos you want to see and watch them there. So we encourage you to go to Psychetruth next time you want
to search for something and we look forward to seeing you again soon!

Severe Neck Pain Relief in 2 Visits Plus Full Explanation and Treatment Video

Severe Neck Pain Relief in 2 Visits Plus Full Explanation and Treatment Video


Hey everybody, it’s Doctor Jeff Kalkstein
with Doctors Adolph and Kalkstein Chiropractic, your Baltimore area chiropractor. And I’m with Liz this morning and Liz came
to us on Friday last week? Friday. Ya, and what was interesting with this is
when people come to us they always want to know well what’s wrong with me, what’s causing
my pain? And so a basic outline would be the pain could
be generating coming from a disc issue or it could be coming from a muscle issue or
it could be coming from a joint issue right? And so what was interesting with this is when
she came in on Friday she had both of those occurring. That is I felt like she had a muscle and she
had a joint involvement. So what I wanted to show you is this: During
the examination we asked Liz, go ahead live turn your head to the left for us right, and
she had some pain on the left side of her neck, and she still has restriction in that
ability. But then when I asked her to turn her head
to the right, and she’s moving much better now than she was on Friday, so she has no
pain on the right side of her neck however she has some tightness and pulling and pain
on the left side. Is that right Liz? That’s it, ya. And so she’s moving much better. How much better do you feel now after just
one session with us? Ten times better. Ten times better yes. Very very minor pain. So Liz had both a muscle problem and a joint
problem and what I wanted to show you right now is how we dealt with that. First thing we’re going to do is we’re going
to go over what we did with a muscle problem. So Liz if you could come around this way for
me okay? The muscle problem, have a seat this way and
face it that way, and both feet on the ground. So what we did is some soft tissue work with
range of motion so we had Liz moved her head to the left as far as we could, we take a
very gentle contact the muscles that are involved right there and when I rub my finger over
there I can feel the knot or the trigger point in that muscle. And then what we had to do is we had her bring
her right here to her right shoulder and guided her over this way. At what that does after a while is that brings
down that knot or trigger point and some of the scar tissue that is formed in that muscle. So come on back over, and this is a very gentle
dental procedure. Okay. Coming back down. Good back over again. And we take two or three passes maybe four,
oh there it is right there very good, very good, very nice. And what do you feel is when I get on top
of that spot, what does it feel like to you? You can feel that pressure but it feels good
to relieve it. There it all is right in there, right? Come back over this way one more time. And we’ll do that again. Very good. So that’s one my soul, never going to drop
back down. That was the upper trapezius, now we’re going
to come over and get a combination of a little bit of the trap and we’re going to get to
levator scapula. So we’re going to bring her head back gently
into extension, she’s going to turn to the left, now Liz if you’ll take that left arm
and put it out in front of you, and it took us a lot to get chin to the left me the last
time, but go ahead and take your chin down to your right me for me. Very nice, very good. Come back up for me, drop your arm down for
me, now take the chin down to the knee again. Oh there it is right there. See and it feels like to me like a lump, like
a ground glass for sale. And after a while that too she starts to break
down. Good
And so what happens is when you have this kind of problem the muscles should be gliding
like this, right? They should glide. But when they’re injured the heal with scar
tissue and now they don’t glide as much, right, and they create this knot in there. The knot doesn’t move very well, it’s very
restricted, and the body’s not sure what’s going on so it has nerve endings going down
there to figure out what’s going on. So it’s very easily irritated again. This is soft tissue technique breaks that
scar tissue down, and eventually the muscles start to glide and arrange an emotion just
in two visits, when does it actually, improve probably twenty or thirty percent right? So I’m going to do one more pass. Bring it out like this, arm out in front of
you, and let’s have you take your chin down. All the way down. All the way down. Okay good now stop right there. Let’s put it on pause for a second okay? We take care of those soft tissue part, no
I wanna show you, and Liz, this will be the first time we’ve had this gentle type of manipulation
to her cervical spine. And the table has special mechanics underneath
it to allow this to happen, alright? So what I want to do is I want to be able
to restore normal motion to the joint ok? So Liz I need you to stand there and I’m going
to have you put your face down right here give me one second. Go ahead and lean in. So this is another great gentle way of getting
some motion into the spine. So Heather come over here for me, very good. Let your arms drop down and slide straight
up for me. And again what I’m trying to do is I’m trying
to improve the movement facet joints on the left side here. So I’m going to put a little bit of tension
on the face piece and I’m going to contact that joint and then we’re just going to just
gently drop down into it. Again a very gentle way of getting motion
into the facet joint. Nice and loose, very good, very good. No last time I adjusted with more of a manual
technique, and I just wanted her to experience this technique. How did you like that? That felt good, ya. That was good, ya. You turn your head to the right for me. See that’s, ya, see that’s normal now after
just two sessions. Turn back this way for me a little bit. Now look at that, that’s even better right
there, that feels better doesn’t it? Good. Now so if you have any questions give us a
call. Again it’s Doctor Jeff and Liz with Adolph
and Kalkstein Chiropractic. Thanks for watching bye now.