Electric Ambulance Medical Golf Cart- From Moto Electric Vehicles

Electric Ambulance Medical Golf Cart- From Moto Electric Vehicles


Good morning. Brett Jackrel here with Moto
Electric Vehicles here to review the 3 passenger EMS bubble buddy unit made by Moto Electric
Vehicles and this is our 2.0 edition. We call it 2.0 because obviously we came out with
the 3 passenger EMS unit about 3 years ago and we’ve had a tremendous response with
it. We’ve added a lot of things to this. This is gonna be our brand new EMS unit going
forward from today up to 2015. I think you guys are gonna enjoy the enhanced features
and a lot of the options we have on this compared to the older style. Not only is it built on
our LE chassis, so you get glove boxes, but you also get additional storage boxes underneath,
you get a backboard holder in the back which will fit your backboard holder that you guys
already have and then once again, speedometer, a lot of updated features on this vehicle
that you guys are gonna enjoy. Now these things have been successful in the
Federal Bureau of Prisons, football stadiums around the world, NFL all the way up from
the NFL level all the way down to the high school level. These have been great for fire
departments, for trails, to get someone from a trail to a real ambulance so you guys can
bring them to the hospital. So these are actually saving lives guys and that’s what we want.
We have our head tech with experience with the Nassau County Fire Department, building
these things, so we know what you guys want and I think you guys are gonna love the 2.0
edition from us. So with no further ado, let’s get right to it. We’re gonna show this vehicle
in action with the sirens and the light packages at the end of this video and then you guys
can go over the features with your bosses or superiors and ask us any questions after
the video. Let’s hop right to it. Alright guys, so we’re standing here at
the back of the EMS unit. Now this thing is 6 feet high, if you’re wondering, so it’s
plenty of room for the passenger that’s in the actual stretcher cot to sit up and
you guys can administer any CPR or whatever you guys need to do, but I want to go over
the back of the vehicle, because if you remember about a year and a half ago we had our mascot
Cooper Jr. on here and the back looked the same but we never had the backboard section,
so now your standard backboard is actually going to fit here and we made additional room
and once again you guys have to have all your supplies with you in case of any emergency.
That’s one thing we’re lacking on the SE version, now that we have the 2.0 version
on the LE chassis we can include that backboard, so that comes included. You can see we have
the red LEDs up here. We’ve done white and red combos. They come standard with all red.
If you guys want a different color light package, just tell your sales representative. We can
switch it to order because we are building these right in Florida and that’s the advantage.
All American made components when it comes down to the batteries, chargers and controllers,
and you guys are getting a customer build with every single EMS unit we do. I gotta
tell you, every single fire department and any person that buys these things always gives
us their ideas and this is what happens, you get a beautiful unit but there might be something
you want to change and we will do that for you, so just tell your sales representative.
You got a full Rhino lined deck here. It actually has the Stryker capability of holding the
stretcher cot. We also have done it for Ferno so if you have a different stretcher brand,
tell us, we can adjust the hold downs for it. Locks in place like you guys are used
to. This things not going anywhere and that’s actually really important obviously, if you’re
transporting a patient, let’s say, off a football field to the EMS unit. You know you
gotta have a stationary item so you can administer any emergency needs on there. So you got the
lock downs. The really cool thing about this vehicle is you have room for a driver and
another fire rescue person or another body to be in the back to help you out, so it’s
actually listed as a 3 passenger EMS unit. So I’m gonna get out of the frame. You’ve
got your taillights, all the safety features. Once again, this is a street legal vehicle
so it does come with the VIN number and title if you need to ride it on roads, you guys
will be licensable for this. So, once again, 3 passenger EMS unit from the back side. Let’s
hop to the front. Let’s show you the inside after that.
Alright so we’re standing at the front of, once again, the Moto Electric Vehicle 3 passenger
EMS unit and this is the front of the vehicle. I want to go over some of the features, obviously
you see that you do get 2 LEDs on the front. If you want to add additional lights, I know
that’s important sometimes, we can do that as well. So you’ll get a total of 4 LED
lights and it has 30 different patterns. Okay the vehicle comes with the star of life stickers
on there. If you don’t want that tell our representatives, but it does come with that.
You can see the beautifully well designed Moto Electric Logo. Automatic windshield wiper,
which we’ll go over in the next segment to show you the inside how you activate that,
and it sits on an AS1 certified tempered glass, so this is the same windshield that’s in
your car, which is obviously needed for street legal use. Two side mirrors with a rearview
mirror inside, also a street legal requirement. You’ve got headlights, 4 way flashers as
well as blinkers and the cool thing is in the next segment you’ll see it shows up
on the display panel and you always know what’s on, whether it be headlights, taillights,
whatever’s on, or your break lights, so that’s activated inside. But this is the
front of the vehicle. We usually do it in red. This is a white unit. We can do it in
several colors depending on what colors we have in stock so give us a call, but with
no further ado let’s hop to the front of the vehicle where the cockpit, where your
driver’s gonna sit, and show you all the cool gadgets and additional storage up on
the dashboard. Alright, so the most important, obviously
you guys are gonna be sitting in this, you want to be comfortable. I want to start off,
obviously high back captain chairs on this vehicle. Seatbelts are included but the real
bread and butter comes with the features that are on the dash. That’s what makes it special.
From the old SE 3 passenger EMS unit to the new LE which is our 2.0 edition, brand new
for 2014 and 2015. So I’m gonna go to the other side. We’ll do a lot of zooming here.
Once again, we have the full Whelen package. This all comes standard. Everything you see
on this vehicle comes standard guys, so if you think there’s a lot of features, there
is and it’s for a good price. So Whelen siren package just like you would have in
a lot of your emergency vehicles already. [Siren Sound]
So you’ve got full control with the RAD setting as well.
[RAD sound] So you can get people out if you guys are
in a crowd control environment, Fourth of July. PA system comes included [Check Check,
buy your next EMS vehicle from MOTO Electric Vehicles] Alright so that comes included,
but the real cool thing is we’ve really enhanced the dash, you know, where it’s
set up, it’s accessible now. Easy to grab the PA system. Let’s zoom in here. 12 volt
accessory outlet, if you guys have any radios or anything that needs to be wired in, that
comes included. New toggle switch on all these vehicles to shut off your lights. You know
you have full control, 30 different patterns, this button right here, the push button will
actually change the patterns, you guys are used to that. 4 way flashers, forward and
reverse switch. On this vehicle you also have a stereo system which comes included.
[Radio sound] Okay so that comes included. You have an auxiliary
plug on there so if you wanted to tie in an iPod or something like that, you have that.
Let’s show them the dashboard, like we said you can see that the 4 way flashers are on,
the headlights are on, so all that can be controlled on here so you always know what’s
drawing off your batteries. Battery indicator so you guys know where your battery’s at.
You also have an amp meter on there, but here’s the additional storage boxes we were talking
about. So these storage boxes are brand new for the LE version, okay, so you have additional
storage for your emergency equipment. [Horn honk]
Horn, windshield wipers, you guys have everything, wood grain dash guys. It’s simple, we give
you a lot for a reasonable price because we know what you guys need out in the field and
we’ve been doing it for over 3 years now. So, what I’d like to do is, now that you’ve
seen the cockpit, I want you guys, let’s close off the video and let’s show you this
in action riding around here and I’m sure you guys , after this video, will be impressed.
Give us a call if you have any questions and we’ll give you the number at the end of
the video. Alright, so listen guys, this is the new 3
passenger EMS unit. We’re very proud of it at the Moto Electric Vehicles shop. It’s
very important to know these go 25 mph, it has all the American made batteries, controllers,
chargers. We give one of the best warranties on the charger of 3 years and the charger’s
on board so you can plug it in anywhere you go. So, once again, call us at 904-247-1818.
Let us know your suggestions and how we can get you a new EMS unit. My name is Brett Jackrel,
Sales Manager for Moto Electric Vehicles and in the words of the PA System, “Buy you
next electric EMS unit from Moto Electric Vehicles.” Thanks guys.
Alright guys, so we’re sitting in the 3 passenger EMS, the brand new unit from Moto
Electric Vehicles and we just want to give you an onboard kind of view of what your firefighter
or representative’s gonna be dealing with. You can see, everything is very compact, it’s
very comfortable. The steering wheel is not in their chest, it’s up so you have a lot
of room. You know, you have a lot of storage here. You have exactly, you know where your
speed is on here, where your battery life is, you’re in forward right now. Everything’s
accessible just like a regular vehicle, so you have your toggle switch here. I have a
car coming in front of me, so I’m gonna shut it off and now when the car goes by,
you know you can turn it right back on if you guys are in an emergency situation.
Push button here to change it to your final pattern. You’ve got your siren here, emergency,
we’re going through, okay? Get out of the way, you know? So the same type of system,
all the emergency features on here. What we’re gonna do is we wanted to give you an onboard
view. Stretcher cot’s right beside me, administer CPR, whatever you guys want to the side, but
we’re gonna give you a 360 view of the vehicle. It’s a beautiful unit. I’m very proud
of the guys in the shop, and you guys give us a call at the number at the end of this
video. Once again, I’m Brett Jackrel, Moto Electric. We hope to hear from you soon.
♫ Theme Music ♫

St John Ambulance’s Isuzu Owner Story

St John Ambulance’s Isuzu Owner Story


The Auckland SERT team uses an Isuzu D-max We look at difficult situations and respond to them. There could be confined spaces or difficult access through a building or a clifftop, so any search and rescue jobs. Having the right tools to do the job is highly important every member of St John Have an Isuzu D-max makes my job, and then ultimately my day a lot easier Please have a heart of gold and support our annual appeal

Imaginary Allergies, Hospital Price Transparency & A High-Tech Tragedy in Las Vegas | The Daily Show


Allergies. They affect the lives
of many bitch-ass Americans. But according to a new study, the most common affliction
is hypochondria. Surprising results
from a new scientific survey of more than 40,000 Americans. The study finds that, while
nearly one in five people said they had a food allergy, only about ten percent
of Americans actually have symptoms
that suggest a real allergy. The data suggests that,
while 50 million Americans think they have food allergies, only about 26 million
actually do. I knew it! Half of Americans
who think they have allergies aren’t allergic to anything. Yeah. The only thing
you gluten-free mother(bleep) are allergic to is a good time. -That’s all it is.
-(cheering) “I’m allergic to gluten. I’m allergic to gluten.” And don’t get me wrong.
I’m not blaming Americans. I’m blaming the doctors
who overdiagnose them. Yeah. I was told I’m allergic to bees, and I know it’s not true,
because I eat bees every day and I’m fine. But, seriously, in Africa, like, food allergies
aren’t a thing. And I know you’re thinking,
“Oh, that’s because, in Africa, you don’t have food.” No, we have food. You racist. It’s just that rashes
are impossible to detect when you already have Ebola. Moving on, here’s some more health news. REPORTER: A new federal rule
requires every hospital across the nation
to post standard charges online for every item
and every service they provide. In the past, some hospitals
have posted only small lists or they’ve asked patients
to contact their health care provider
for pricing. But you can see here,
look at this long list. Now a requirement
for every hospital, and they’ll have to update
the list at least once a year. Yes, yes, yes. Finally, American hospitals now have to tell you
their prices in advance, which is a huge improvement. Hospitals are the only places that can surprise you
with prices. You go in, you get the surgery,
then, three weeks later, you get the bill
for a price of your car. Like, imagine
if you order Chipotle, and the next month
you get a bill for $80,000. You’d be like,
“What? If I’d known that, I wouldn’t have gotten
extra guacamole! What the hell?” Like, I’m serious. I really hope
this is the first step to getting America’s
health care costs under control. ‘Cause, when I first got
to the U.S., I had to have surgery
on my appendix, right? And then after I saw the bill
that came, I was like,
“You guys should’ve let me die.” Like, at that price, I could’ve
sent myself to medical school and then learned how
to take out my own appendix, charged myself $80,000,
and I’d be rich! (cheering and applause) This is a step forward. Moving on, this week is the Consumer
Electronics Show in Las Vegas. CES. It’s where tech companies showcase the latest
in futuristic nightmares. And this year
hasn’t disappointed. REPORTER: While
the Consumer Electronics Show is set to take Las Vegas
by storm this morning, one computerized companion
won’t be there. Take a look at the moment
a self-driving Tesla Model S mows down a robot
in the street. This Promobot’s damage
will prevent him from appearing
in this year’s show. (chuckles):
Oh, wow. A self-driving car
mowed down a robot pedestrian. And you know what’s funny
about this is that, as humans,
we’re so narcissistic we always assumed that, when
the robot apocalypse comes, the robots will be coming
after us. We’ve never once considered that robots probably hate each
other just as much as we do. Yeah. That car probably saw
the robot and was like, “Hey, WALL-E, kill yourself. Your mama was a Roomba.” (cackling) Also, is it just me
or does that robot look like it was trying
to get hit by the car? ‘Cause what is the robot doing
in the middle of the road? It’s probably got some
insurance scam going, you know? Like, the robot is just like,
“Oh, ow, ow, got me.” Gonna show up to court
in a neck brace, like, “I’ve been unable to work
and support my wife and three toasters.”

The Secret Weapon That Could Help Save Bees

The Secret Weapon That Could Help Save Bees


Hi, this is Alex, from MinuteEarth. Each spring in California, so many almond
trees put out flowers at the same time that local bees can’t pollinate them all. So, almond farmers pay beekeepers to bring
bees from all over the country at exactly the moment the trees flower. That might seem crazy, but, almonds and other
bee-pollinated crops are worth 17 billion dollars a year, so it’s worth it to farmers,
and to beekeepers, who make more money renting out their bees than selling honey. Unfortunately, when we bring so many bees
together, parasites and diseases easily spread from one bee colony to another. And when bees feed on just one type of crop
at a time, they don’t get all the vitamins and minerals they need. What’s more, the honeybees can get sickened
by the pesticides that keep crops safe from other insects. As a result of all this, since 1960, the number
of commercial bees in the US has fallen by half. And since so many crops require bees for pollination,
and farmers are planting more crops every year to keep up with demand, if bee numbers
continue to drop, it could jeopardize our future food supply. But we’re learning how to help bees. Beekeepers and farmers are working together
to reduce bees’ exposure to pesticides. Non-profits and bee lovers are planting more
wildflowers across the landscape, so commercial and wild bees have a more diverse diet. And universities are breeding parasite- and
disease-resistant bees. And we can also help bees fight parasites
with a chemical weapon they already have in their own arsenal – propolis. Honeybees in the wild smear this substance
inside their nests, which sanitizes them and keeps intruders out. To make propolis, bees visit trees and collect
resins rich in flavonoids and aromatic acids, which are toxic to many organisms. Then they mix the resins with wax, making
a sticky antibiotic glue. Bees in commercial hives also make propolis,
but they only use it to seal gaps, and don’t smear it on the inside walls, probably because
the walls are smoother than the inside of a tree. In these hives, bee larvae often get sick. But, if you build a hive out of rough, unfinished
lumber or attach plastic pieces filled with holes to the walls, bees spread way more propolis
and their larvae suffer way fewer infections. So beekeepers are starting to rough up their
own beehives to encourage their bees to spread propolis. This helps the bees stay healthy, and keep
pollinating crops and making honey. That is a sweet solution. This video was sponsored by the University
of Minnesota, where students, faculty and staff across all fields of study are working
to solve the Grand Challenges facing society. One of these challenges is to ensure we can
feed the world sustainably, and part of the solution is to foster ecosystem resilience. In the Department of Entomology, Professor
Marla Spivak and researchers in the Bee Lab are working to promote the conservation, health,
and diversity of the bees that pollinate our crops, whether they’re wild or commercial. The Bee Lab has even bred a line of disease-resistant
honey bees. Thanks, University of Minnesota!

How your pictures can help reclaim lost history | Chance Coughenour

How your pictures can help reclaim lost history | Chance Coughenour


Translator: Carolina Casado Parras Why do people deliberately
destroy cultural heritage? By doing so, do they believe
they’re erasing our history? Our cultural memory? It’s true that we are losing
cultural heritage to erosion and natural disasters, but this is something
that is simply difficult to avoid. I’m here to show you today
how we can use pictures — your pictures — to reclaim the history that is being lost using innovative technology and the effort of volunteers. In the early 20th century, archaeologists discovered
hundreds of statues and artifacts at the ancient city of Hatra, in northern Iraq. Statues like this one
were found in fragments, some of them missing their heads or arms, yet the clothing that they are wearing and their pose can still tell us their story. For example, we believe that by wearing
a knee-length tunic and open bare feet, this was representative of a priest. However, with a closer look
at this particular piece, we can see that this tunic being worn
was elaborately decorated, which has led many researchers to believe this was actually a statue of a king
performing his religious functions. When the Mosul Cultural Museum
opened in 1952 in northern Iraq, this statue, as well as others, were placed there to preserve them
for future generations. Following the US-led invasion
of Iraq in 2003, a few statues and artifacts
were relocated to Baghdad, but this statue remained. Then in February of last year,
a video was released, and it instantly went viral. Maybe some of you remember seeing it. Here’s a short clip. (Video) (Singing in Arabic) (Singing ends) Not a very pleasant sight, right? Did you notice anything
familiar in the video? There it is. There is that very statue, as it was toppled over, breaking into pieces. When Matthew Vincent and I saw this video, we were shocked. Since we are archaeologists
using innovative technology for digital preservation, an idea sprung to mind. Maybe we can crowdsource the images
that were taken of these artifacts before they were destroyed, to create digital reconstructions. If we can do that, maybe we can put them
into a virtual museum to tell that story. And so two weeks after we saw this video, we started the project
called Project Mosul. Remember the pictures of the statue
I showed you before? This is actually the crowdsourced
reconstruction of it before it was destroyed. Now, many of you may be wondering, how exactly does this work? Well, the key to this technology
is called photogrammetry, and it was invented here, in Germany. It is the technology that allows us
to use two-dimensional images taken of the same object
from different angles to create a 3D model. I know you may be thinking
this sounds like magic — but it’s not. Let me show you how it works. Here are two crowdsourced images
of the same statue. What the computer can do is it can detect similar features
between the photographs — similar features of the object. Then, by using multiple photos, in this case, it can begin
to reconstruct the object in 3D. In this case, you have the position of the cameras
when each image was taken, shown in blue. Now, this is a partial
reconstruction, I admit, but why would I say partial? Well, simply because the statue
was positioned against a wall. We don’t have photographs
taken of it from the back. If I wanted to complete a full
digital reconstruction of this statue, I would need a proper camera, tripods, proper lighting, but we simply can’t do that
with crowdsourced images. Think about it: How many of you, when you visit a museum, take photographs
of all parts of the statue, even the back side of it? Well, maybe if some of you find
Michelangelo’s David interesting, I guess — (Laughter) But the thing is, if we can find more images of this object, we can improve the 3D model. When we started the project, we started it with
the Mosul Museum in mind. We figured we may get a few images, some people interested, make one or two virtual reconstructions, but we had no idea that we had sparked
something that would grow so quickly. Before we knew it, we realized it was obvious: we could apply this same idea
to lost heritage anywhere. And so, we decided to change
the name of the project to Rekrei. Then, in the summer of last year, “The Economist” magazine’s media lab
reached out to us. They asked us, “Hey, would you like us
to build a virtual museum to put the reconstructions back inside, to tell the story?” Can you imagine us saying no? Of course not. We said yes! We were so excited. This was exactly
the initial dream of that project. And so now, any of you can experience
RecoVR Mosul on your phone, using Google Cardboard or a tablet or even YouTube 360. Here is a screenshot
from the virtual museum. And there it is … the partial reconstruction of the statue, as well as the Lion of Mosul, the first reconstruction
completed by our project. Although the video doesn’t explicitly show
the Lion of Mosul being destroyed, we have many other examples
of large artifacts being destroyed that were simply too large
to have been stolen. For example, the Gate of Nimrud in northern Iraq. This is a digital
reconstruction from before, and this is actually
during the destruction. Or the Lion of Al-Lāt, in Palmyra, Syria: before … and after. Although virtual reconstructions
are primarily the main focus of our project, some people have been asking the question: Can we print them in 3D? We believe 3D printing
doesn’t offer a straightforward solution to lost heritage. Once an object is destroyed, it’s gone. But 3D printing does offer
an addition to tell that story. For example, I can show you here … There is the statue from Hatra and the Lion of Mosul. (Applause) Thank you. Now, if you look closely, you’ll notice that there are some parts
that have been printed in color, and some parts that are in white or gray. This part was added
simply to hold the statues up. This works the same way
if you visit a museum, and a statue is found in fragments; it’s put together
for the people to see it. This makes sense, right? However, we’re much more interested in what virtual reality
has to offer for lost heritage. Here is an example
of one of the tower tombs that was destroyed in Palmyra. Using Sketchfab’s online viewer, we can show that we have reconstructed
three parts of the exterior of the tomb, but we also have photos of the inside, so we’re beginning to create
a reconstruction of the wall and the ceiling. Archaeologists worked there
for many, many years, so we also have architectural
drawing plans of this lost heritage. Unfortunately, we are not only losing
cultural heritage to areas of conflict and at war — we’re also losing it to natural disasters. This is a 3D model
of Durbar Square in Kathmandu, before the earthquake
that occurred last April … and this is after. You may be thinking, you didn’t create these 3D models
with only tourist photographs, and that’s true. But what this represents is the ability for large, public
organizations and private industry to come together
for initiatives like ours. And so one of the major challenges
of our project, really, is to find photographs that were taken
before something happens, right? Well, the internet is basically a database
with millions of images, right? Exactly. So we have begun to develop a tool that allows us to extract images
from websites like Flickr, based on their geotags, to complete reconstructions. Because we’re not only losing cultural
heritage to natural disasters and in war, but we’re also losing it
to something else. Any idea, just looking
at these two pictures? Maybe it’s a little difficult to remember, but only a few weeks ago, this was the example of human
destruction by human stupidity. Because a tourist in Lisbon
wanted to climb onto this statue and take a selfie with it — (Laughter) and pulled it down with him. So we’re already finding photographs to complete a digital
reconstruction of this. We need to remember that the destruction of cultural heritage
isn’t a recent phenomenon. In the 16th century, European priests and explorers burned
thousands of Maya books in the Americas, of which we only have a handful left. Fast-forward to 2001, when the Taliban blew up
the Bamiyan Buddhas in Afghanistan. You see, cultural heritage
is about our shared global history. It helps us connect
with our ancestors and their stories, but we’re losing pieces of it
every day to natural disasters and in areas of conflict. Of course, the loss of human life
is the most heartbreaking loss … but cultural heritage offers us a way
to preserve the memory of the people for future generations. We need your help to reclaim
the history that is being lost. Will you join us? (Applause)

There’s a Horse In The Hospital | John Mulaney | Netflix Is A Joke

There’s a Horse In The Hospital | John Mulaney | Netflix Is A Joke


– Now I don’t know if you’ve
been following the news, but I’ve been keeping my ears open and it seems like everyone, everywhere is super mad about
everything all the time. I try to stay a little optimistic,
even though I will admit, things are getting pretty sticky. Here’s how I try to look
at it, and this is just me. This guy being the president, it’s like there’s a horse
loose in a hospital. It’s like there’s a horse
loose in a hospital. I think eventually
everything’s gonna be okay, but I have no idea
what’s gonna happen next. And neither do any of you, and neither do your parents, because there’s a horse
loose in the hospital. It’s never happened before. No one knows what the
horse is gonna do next, least of all the horse. He’s never been in a hospital before. He’s as confused as you are. There’s no experts. They try to find experts on the news. They’re like, we’re joined now by a man that once saw a bird in the airport. It’s like, get out of here with that shit. We’ve all seen a bird in the airport. This is a horse loose in a hospital. When a horse is loose in a
hospital you gotta stay updated. So all day long, you walk around, oh, what’d the horse
do, what’d the horse do. The updates, they’re not always bad. Sometimes they’re just odd. You’re like, the horse used the elevator? I didn’t know he knew how to do that. The creepiest days are when you don’t hear from the horse at all. Like down in the
operating room, like, hey, has anyone, uh… has anyone hea– (makes clip-clop sounds). Those are those quiet
days when people are like, it looks like the horse
has finally calmed down and then ten seconds
later the horse is like, I’m gonna run towards the baby incubators and smash ’em with my hooves, I’ve got nice hooves and
long tail, I’m a horse. And it’s like, aw, that’s
what I thought you’d say you dumb fuckin’ horse. And then, then, then you
go to brunch with people and they’re like, there
shouldn’t be a horse in the hospital. And it’s like, we’re well past that. And then other are people are like, well if there’s gonna
be horse in the hospital I’m gonna say the n-word on TV, and it’s like, those
don’t match up at all. And then for a second it seems like maybe we could survive the horse, and then five thousand miles away a hippo was like, I have a nuclear bomb, And I’m gonna blow up the hospital. And before we could say
anything, the horse was like, if you even fucking look at the hospital, I will stomp you to death with my hooves. I dare you to do it. I want, I want you to do it. I want you to do so I can
stomp you with my hooves I’m so fuckin’ crazy. And he’s like, you think
you’re fuckin’ crazy, I’m a fuckin’ hippopotamus, I
live in a fuckin’ lake of mud, I’m fuckin’ crazy. And all of us are like,
okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, like poor Andy Cohen at
those goddamn reunions, okay, okay, okay, okay, okay, okay. And then for a second we were like, maybe the horse catcher
will catch the horse, and then the horse is like, I have fired the horse catcher. He can do that? That shouldn’t be allowed,
no matter who the horse is. I don’t remember that in Hamilton.

Cerebral palsy (CP) – causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment & pathology

Cerebral palsy (CP) – causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment & pathology


It’s pretty well-established that your brain’s
really important. It’s like, if your body was a computer, your brain’s the mainframe.
It controls everything, whether you’re aware of it or not. Cerebral palsy means “brain
disease causing paralysis”; so essentially, cerebral palsy refers to damage to the brain
that causes loss of muscle control, like for example if the cerebellum was damaged, patients
might have issues with fine motor skills like using writing or typing. That being said,
though, cerebral palsy’s a broad umbrella term to basically cover a wide variety of
issues, since ultimately the muscles affected and severity depends on which part of the
mainframe’s been affected, right? Cerebral palsy’s considered a neurodevelopmental
disease, meaning that something happens to an area of the brain during its initial development,
which is an extremely sensitive period. If that area doesn’t develop right, then it
can’t carry out whatever function it’s supposed to control. What’s this vague “something” that can
happen, though? Well, I said “something” because there’s such a wide variety of causes.
The majority of cerebral palsy cases are thought to happen before birth, or prenatally, which
typically means the underlying cause is really hard to pin down. Exposure to radiation and
infection during fetal development can cause cerebral palsy. Hypoxia to the developing
fetus been linked as well, in this case the developing brain doesn’t get enough oxygen,
potentially from problems like the placenta not being able to supply enough oxygen and
nutrients. Cerebral palsy doesn’t have to happen prenatally, though, and some postnatal
causes are things like head trauma, or again an infection or a period of oxygen deprivation.
Although most cases are likely are due to some trauma or injury, a very small proportion
of cases are due to a genetic mutation. Even though the brain damage or injury or abnormality
is permanent, one super important point about cerebral palsy is that it doesn’t get worse
over time, and for that reason it’s considered a non-progressive disease. Cerebral palsy is classified by the type of
muscle movements that result from the brain injury and how that affects what activities
the patient can perform. The first type is called spastic cerebral palsy, which accounts
for about 70% of cases, and this is characterized by having really tight or stiff muscles, which
can make patients’ movements seem jerky. This tightness results from a lesion in an
upper motor neuron. So with a lesion, which just means some kind of abnormality, the ability
of some of these neurons to receive GABA might be impaired. GABA’s the main inhibitory
neurotransmitter, so if nerve impulses can’t be inhibited which is a double negative, then
those nerves are basically over-excited, leading to hypertonia, which is an abnormal increase
in muscle activity, basically like if the muscles were constantly flexed. This is why
some people with spastic cerebral palsy have a scissor gait. Think about how hard it’d
be to walk when your adductor muscles were always partly flexed, which causes your knees
and thighs to constantly touch. Similarly, sometimes patients have a “toe-walk”,
because their calves are always flexed, which pulls the achilles tendon up and causes someone
to go up on their toes. A second type of cerebral palsy is Athetoid
or dyskinetic cerebral palsy, and this one involves damage or injury to the basal ganglia.
The basal ganglia is this structure here which essentially helps us initiate and prevent
certain movements. If the basal ganglia becomes damaged, patients can lose the ability to
prevent movements, and therefore they can have involuntary movements, meaning out of
their control. So dyskinetic cerebral palsy is characterized by dystonia and/or chorea—dystonia
is random, slow, and uncontrolled movements in the limbs and trunk. Chorea is random “dance-like”
movements, since the small uncontrolled movements seem to move from muscle to muscle. Finally there’s ataxic cerebral palsy. Taxis
refers to an order or arrangement, so ataxic essentially means without order, which is
in reference to patients with this type being shaky or uncoordinated, and this is caused
by damage to the cerebellum, which helps with coordination and fine or precise movements.
These patients often have clumsy or unstable movements and poor balance when doing things
like walking or picking something up. Although different from patient to patient,
many patients with muscle control issues have other symptoms as well. Patients often experience
pain from tightened muscles or abnormal posture and stiff joints. Also, abnormal movements
might make it difficult to sleep at night and patients can develop sleep disorders.
Eating can become difficult as well, which can range from the preparation of food to
the action of chewing and swallowing food. Other brain-related issues are also associated,
like difficulties with speaking and communication, vision problems, and learning disabilities. Since cerebral palsy involves a permanent
abnormality to the brain’s structure, it’s not curable, but that doesn’t mean it’s
not treatable. Treatment for cerebral palsy usually involves a multidisciplinary approach,
pulling from a number of clinical specialties like neurologists, rehabilitation specialists,
occupational therapists, speech therapists, and others—hopefully to find a unique approach
for each patient, ultimately improving their quality of life. Physical therapy can be used
to build strength and improve walking ability, along with stretching to reduce contracture,
which is a permanent shortening of muscle tissue from being hypertonic or contracted
for so long. Sometimes muscle relaxants are given or botulinum toxin is injected into
certain muscles to reduce hypertonicity and relax the muscles, which can both help reduce
pain associated with hypertonus and also help fit patients with specific orthotic braces.
Sometimes surgery might also be performed to help with a variety of issues, like loosening
tight muscles, straightening out bones that have been subject to abnormal muscle forces
over time, and cutting certain nerves to reduce their associated movements
or spasms.

Rhode Island Hospital’s Outpatient Dialysis Program

Rhode Island Hospital’s Outpatient Dialysis Program


The essence of dialysis really is filtering
the blood, getting waste products that the kidneys are not normally able to get rid out
of the blood because those waste products build up and make people very ill. People
with kidney failure have, as a big problem, a lack of ability to get rid of the waste
products that we all generate, everyday in the course of normal living. When those waste
products build up, people can get ill and we need to get rid of them in some way. So,
dialysis involves a system where fluid runs through a filter, runs past patients’ blood,
and substances in the blood, that are dangerous or hazardous, got transferred from the blood
into this fluid, which is flowing past the blood and then get excreted. Dialysis in the
state continues to make a tremendous difference for the lives of about a thousand people in
our state who have chronic kidney disease. We started our program in 2009, October 2009,
and we currently have about 85 patients in both centers, with the center on Chapman Street
and our center right her in East Providence. It’s our presence on the East Bay, so we hope
to make that easy for our patients who live in the East Bay and in southeastern Massachusetts,
as well to use this facility. People shouldn’t have difficulty getting here or parking here.
It’s a beautiful, beautiful facility, as you can see here. It’s nice and airy and light.
Gets lots of natural light in, which I think makes people, uh, makes people feel better.
And again, here, we offer in center dialysis and offer the opportunity for patients to
choose the other types if dialysis, as well, home hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis
by using our facility at Chapman Street at the same time. We have 12 bays here in East
Providence and in Chapman Street, we have 18 bays. At Chapman Street, we offer dialysis
till about 10 o’clock at night for people who will go to school, people who work during
the day. So about one third of the patients get dial is starting at about 5 o’clock at
night and go to about 10:00 at night, as well. We have televisions available. Patients have
cable. They can look at television during the treatment. This is Wi-Fi accessible, so
that people can bring their laptops in, surf the internet, do email through their work,
etc. when they’re here. The cartridges that we use, which are right here, are made of
material that actually is much more compatible with patient’s blood so people don’t get reactions
to it. The machines allow a very rapid blood flow, so that makes the treatment very efficient
and can sometimes shorten the treatment. The dialysate, which is specially processed water
that we use that the patient’s waste products go into and the patient’s are exposed to,
is now very very closely monitored, kept bacteria free. The machines, themselves, are automated
and can pick up any problems that may occur during the dialysis treatment. The machines
don’t let us take too much fluid off, for example. They closely monitor that and the
machines kind of serve as a medical record to also tell us about how the treatment’s
been going. We have a multidisciplinary approach her and many people are involved in a patient’s
care. The most important, by far and away, is the patient, him or herself, who sits absolutely
at the center of our care plans and of our care, surrounding the patient, our physicians,
and nephrologists, interventional radiologists, transplant surgeons, general surgeons, trained
specialized nephrology nurses, dialysis technicians, social workers, and dieticians, who have a
special training and expertise and the care of people with kidney disease. But again,
the most important member of that team, by far, is the patient.

How To Build A Hospital

How To Build A Hospital


In Western Sydney, healthcare needs are evolving as our population grows and ages and people live longer. We’re transforming the way we deliver healthcare, and the role that hospitals play in our community to embrace emerging technologies and changing community expectations. Here at Westmead, we are part of the most exciting redevelopment of a health precinct in Australia. There’s a lot happening and we want to share with you all the work that goes into building the first part of our Redevelopment – a new hospital building. How do you build a hospital? First comes the planning. Then comes the building. The planning can take several years, as there’s a lot to consider. We care about our patients and the community and we have to ask ourselves some big questions. How can we help people to be healthy over the next 50 years? How can we better integrate our world-class research and education? How can we design and building infrastructure for the future? What does world-class clinical care look like for the next generation? To answer these questions we have to know what our health needs are now and how they will change in the future. We have to look at new ways of working. We have to develop the right models of care for our
patients. To do all of this we speak to our staff, patients, carers and our community. This is all done through project user groups called PUGs. PUGs work closely with patients, carers and architects. They take all the questions that we asked ourselves and the answers to design the new hospital building. PUGs are used at every stage of the hospital development. Find out who your PUG representative is and how to get involved. We really want to hear from you. So what does a PUG work on first? They develop a Functional Brief. The Functional Brief tells the planners how you work, how you deliver healthcare and how your department works with other areas of the hospital. This phase also sees us work out how other important services interact with clinical service delivery, like education and
research. A big focus is on innovation and finding a better way to do things. The next phase is Concept Design and this is where it gets really exciting. We get to start looking at drawings and pictures of the building, its size and location. From there we look at flow – how the patients and services, as well as staff, will move throughout the building and even how information travels between departments and across the precinct as a whole. But we go even further and look at how the precinct is going to interact with the transportation networks of the city and the surrounding areas. We have to test this again and again to get it right, even going back to the Functional Briefs and the Concept Design to make sure we’re holding true. That’s when we move to Schematic Design. It includes detailed architectural plans and layout for each floor, and it is at that time we have to do the budget planning to make sure that we stay on budget and meet our priorities. Then are ready for Detailed Design. This literally gives us the nuts and bolts of the new building – right down to the power points and the furniture. This is the plan the builder uses to create our new building. While the design is finalised by the Local Health District and the project team, through the tender and construction process, we must focus on transitioning into the new building. . You will often hear this referred to as Commissioning. There is Building Commissioning, where the project team ensure things like electricity, IT and air-conditioning are working. We must focus on Operational Commissioning. Our tools of the trade may have moved, departments that we may connect with may be further away or closer, and new technologies may be in our workplace. We must adapt to new ways of working and we must do that now. And that’s how you building a hospital. The planning alone can take over a year. We use the time between now and the opening of the new to introduce new models of care, to test new processes and procedures, to get used to doing things differently before we make the move, and to work out how we stay connected with with teams and services in the existing buildings. You’ll be hearing plenty from the project team because it’s a long and important journey that we are on. You see we’re not just building a hospital, we’re building new services, new networks of care and better ways of doing things. We’re building health and we’re transforming lives.

AMBULANCE – Court métrage (Horreur Fantastique) Céleste Grant 2020


This video is not recommended for children under 10 years old. Well, all the papers for the vehicle are in order. Insurance, registration card, certificate of non-pledge, All you have to do is sign the vehicle transfer declaration. Right… So now we’re going to see the vehicle. CÉLESTE GRANT
Presents Here’s the thing. Ah yeah ok, you left everything from the ambulance. Yes, absolutely, we didn’t change anything, we left everything, the equipment, the cupboards, The drawers, everything is as before. – It’s original!
– But go ahead, go up, we’ll visit. And there you even have lights on the side up there. Ah! – It’s great, it’s really cool!
– And there, at the very bottom on the left, you have a switch. If you press it, it makes speaker with the front cabin. “Right here, you can communicate with the driver. ” There you go … The keys are yours! Thank you. Uh … Since it’s an old ambulance, Does that mean there were deaths in it? AMBULANCE “Hello?” ” Yes, I call you back. You didn’t tell me that there was a noise at the back when you are driving. ” A noise ? Ah no, I assure you, there is no noise. ” I seemed to have heard something … “No, logically there is nothing, but call me if there is a problem. ” Well, listen, I’ll be careful, then I’ll see. – “All right. ”
– Thank you. Shit! AMBULANCE A Celeste Grant movie With
Maximilien Dulac With
Alice Aglaghanian / Allan Christopher Music
CO.AG – Music Produced by
CELESTIAL GRANT Thanks to
TIPEURS © 2018 – All Rights Reserved Thank you for watching my short AMBULANCE I hope you liked it. I really invite you to give me your opinion and to react in the comment space of this video. Also, don’t hesitate to put a thumbs up if you liked this little film. For the record, AMBULANCE was completed in just a few hours. We filmed the daytime scenes in just 1.5 hours, And the night scenes in 2 hours max. It was like a challenge we gave ourselves. Me, behind the camera, the main actor and, let’s say, “the ghost”. Of course, the vehicle occupies an important place in the scenario. But I’m not going to detail now, Because a Making of is now available on this Youtube channel. Or at least it will be soon. Find the link of it into the video description. Don’t hesitate to go see the Making of to get more details on this film, The special effects, and filming anecdotes that we encountered. Admittedly, it is a film with certain small defects. We could criticize, for example, the acting not always correct. But I remind you that they are not precisely actors, But just my friends who agreed to play in my movie. But what I really like about this movie : AMBULANCE, is that it proves that with very little budget and a lot of energy and passion, We can still tell a story, Which, casually, transmits an atmosphere, and, I like to think so: A certain little thrill of horror, anguish, fantastic type. AMBULANCE is one of those kind of achievements that raise awareness, That we can really achieve beautiful things without budget, when we’re motivated. right, I stop here. If you like fiction, short films, web series, Don’t hesitate to subscribe to this channel by activating the bell. I remind in passing that I have other YouTube channels, on which I experiment with other forms of creations. Like music, Urbex or Gaming. All information is in description. I’m Céleste Grant, see you soon, For new videos.