How To Help Our Colleagues With Mental Illness | Incident Report 156

How To Help Our Colleagues With Mental Illness | Incident Report 156


– [Logan] One second. All
right, I think we’re live, Z. – Don’t make me get in my zone. Don’t make me check on my phone. Ball so hard ZPAC wanna find me. I don’t know where we are
right now, Tom Hinueber. We’re talking about mental illness and I already feel unwell, mentally. – Well, yeah – [Z] You know. – Yeah. – [Z] You know. Guys, guys, today’s
show is real important. I’ll tell you why. Margot Kidder died. Margot Kidder, for those who
don’t know, was Lois Lane in the classic Superman series.
The first Superman series, I think the first three or
four, she was Lois Lane. And she was a big part of
my childhood, Tom Hinueber. She was beautiful. She
was smart. She was strong. Even though Superman was a
douche, she kinda kept up, and did her thing. She was a reporter. She was a feminist before
being a feminist was a thing. – How are those Superman
movies still so much better than the ones they made with all the CGI? – Dude, I’m tellin’ you,
it’s just like the original Star Wars episodes are better,
you start throwing CGI, it doesn’t feel right. It’s just like health 2.0,
it doesn’t feel right to us, clickin’ the boxes and
staring at the computer. It’s not medicine anymore, right? So, Margot Kidder got rather
more famous for something that went wrong with her. And that was a mental
breakdown that she had in 1996, where she was found in the
backyard in a house in Glendale, which we all know is the Armenian
capital of the free world. – It’s Little Armenia, Z. – Lil’, Lil’ Armenia, and
by the way, everyone thinks that I’m Armenian ‘cuz
my last name’s Damania. They wanna add an “n” onto
to it, so I’m “Damanian,” and I grew up in Central
Valley of California, which was Little Armenia, and
so I feel like an honorary Armenian. – You know, it’s funny,
I have an Armenian aunt. So, little white privilege
Tom Hinueber actually grew up eating [Phonetic Zahk Tar
Za] and stuff like that. – That’s amazing. You can finally assign
yourself to an actual, legitimate genocide. That’s amazing. – (laughs) – Um, so, which, by the way
that was a real genocide. I don’t care what you say,
Turkish people. You’re liars. – Turkish people are dicks, Z. – [Z] They kind of are. – They really are. – They really are. I
have no idea if they are. I know Dr. Oz is Turkish,
and I hate Dr. Oz so maybe that’s a thing. Anyway, so, Margot
Kidder, speaking of ADHD and metal illness, Margot
Kidder famously had that breakdown in ’96 and they way
that the press treated her at that time was
absolutely unconscionable. They literally made her out
to be this crazy, ex, has-been star who had hit rock-bottom,
was found in this backyard with the caps missing from
her teeth, totally disheveled, wearing rags. And what
came out later is that she’d been suffering with
mental illness for a long time, was diagnosed with what they
were calling manic depression, or bi-polar and had multiple,
sort of mini-breakdowns over the course of her
career, even at the peak of her powers, but no one knew about this. And the stigma of mental illness
was applied to this lady, who had, again, this amazing acting career and she was treated like crap. In fact, one of my favorite
shows, “The Family Guy” actually did something
really horrible to her. Can we roll that clip Logan?
Do you have that clip? – Of course. – Margot Kidder was here. – Oh, we loved you in the Superman movies. You were just wonderful. – (Screams) – I mean, so, look, I
love “The Family Guy” as much as the next
guy, but that sort of… Okay, imagine this, Tom,
like what if Freddie Mercury is dying of AIDS, and
they do the similar clip where it’s Freddie
Mercury writhing in pain from an opportunistic
infection in a hospital bed, and “The Family Guy” does that clip. Would that not have generated outrage of an order of magnitude that
would’ve wrecked the show? – Yeah. It definitely would’ve. I hate that clip. It’s
just, that’s mean, man. And it’s like, where’s
the joke? There’s no joke. – Here’s the thing, Tom
Hinueber is one of the meanest people I know, and that’s why I love him. For him to say that, means that this is a particularly mean clip. And again, you have
family members who suffer from mental illness. My
mother is a psychiatrist. I treat a lot of patients
and have that suffer from mental illness. The
stigma is huge, but part of the reason we wanna talk about
this today in particular, apart from the Margot Kidder
story, which, I think in later life she became an
advocate for mental health. Which is why we have a link
at the bottom here to donate to the National Alliance on Mental Illness ’cause we want to support
people who are supporting destigmatizing mental illness. This idea that we in healthcare
suffer disproportionately from mental illness, including
PTSD, suicidality, burnout, emotional detachment, and
then other mental illness, and the stigma in healthcare
is so strong that we can’t talk about it for fear of being fired. We can’t talk about it as
physicians for fear of licensure renewal. They ask you specific
questions in certain states. Are you diagnosed with a mental illness? Have you been on medications? These kind of things are …
what they do is set up a stigma so that people don’t seek help. Then we have higher than
the normal population levels of suicide, of… – [Tom] Z, fix your mic. – What’s wrong with my mic? – [Tom] It turns into
your beautiful chest. – It’s not easy having
world-class chesticles. – [Logan] It’s not. – It really isn’t. And, you know what? My fans appreciate
that. All three of them. So, this idea then, that
we’re so stigmatized that we can’t even seek
help has been huge. Now, this came to a head actually, ZPAC. So, I did a little
experiment on Mother’s Day. Apart from posting the
interview I did with my wife about the biases against and challenges of mothers in medicine,
I did a “Ask Me Anything” on Reddit, and for some
reason it went super viral and had over 270,000
interactions and views, and went to the top of the Reddit AMA. And that’s weird. I had
all these friends of mine, I haven’t talked to in
years who were texting me, “Hey, you’re Reddit famous.” I’m like, we have a million
followers on Facebook, but we do a Reddit AMA
and suddenly we’re famous? But, this idea, I think at
the top of the Reddit AMA was a comment about burnout, suicidality in medical professions and
that got the most up votes and generated a discussion. And people were tweeting, “Hey, ZDogg’s doing this AMA
on Reddit and you guys should check it out.” But I actually read it
and got very depressed because I realize how deep
the struggle is for frontline clinicians in the country
struggling with burnout, suicidality, mental illness
and completely stigmatized. And that made me think
we should really talk about this today. – [Tom] Like you said, I
grew up with a mother who’s severely mentally ill.
And I’ll tell you this, there’s no casserole coming to your house when your mother is mentally ill. But when your mother
has cancer or something, you are getting love and
support from the community. And it’s always this, like
weird thought of like, well, those people are mentally weak. It’s like, well, should I
call your genetic lineage biologically weak? Because
that’s what it seems like to me, if we’re gonna use the same logic. – You’re spot on. I
mean, this is a disease of an organ in the body … the mind. If you have heart disease,
they do GoFundMe campaigns. They do telethons. Jerry Lewis does telethons for kids with developmentally delay. Do you get the same
destigmatization with mental health? No, because people think
it’s a moral failing. It is not. And the truth is, look,
I’ve talked about this idea, because we’ve talked about meditation, we’ve talked about
mindfulness on the show before and my own sort journey down that path and how hard it is, and how
training your mind is hard. Now, imagine, we’ve talked
about these little sub-minds that process data and do emotions,
and have hopes and fears, and dreams. And the elephant
and the rider and all that. Imagine if you have a
sub-mind, or two, or three that don’t give up. They’re
constantly ruminating on horrible thoughts. They constantly are
projecting a self-image that is inaccurate, bad, hateful,
hurtful, filled with guilt and regret, and this is constantly on loop all the time. Then you put that person
in a healthcare environment where they’re getting
stimulus of the worst kind. Things that would give
a normal person PTSD, we see every single day,
including all the pressures from our colleagues,
administrators, and patients, and each other, and ourselves to perform better,
faster, more efficiently. And you put that kind of mind
that’s already struggling in that situation and it
is going to be a disaster. We have huge levels of
suicide and burnout. I re-posted an episode with
my mom, who is a psychiatrist talking about patients she’s
lost to suicide, to homicide, and how difficult that is. And, I’m telling you, she was
holding back on that episode. When she talks to me about
it, it’s even more candid and it’s so hard, right?
But we stigmatize all of it. If we treated the mind as
an organ, and as a disease process, but also, be
careful of over-medicalizing. So, we don’t want to throw
medications at everything. Sometimes really good
cognitive behavioral therapy, really good psychotherapy,
and just changing our environment, changing our
own personal way that we deal with things, that takes work. And it’s not necessarily a medication. It’s not drugging someone to death. And sometimes drugs are very important. We can’t lessen the importance of that, but this idea that we’re just
over-medicating everyone, that’s not the idea here. The idea is that we
destigmatize the disease. We find the best way to treat
that particular patient. For me, being a Type A neurotic
with OCD, I found meditation has been a tremendous thing
because I’m not severe enough to require medications. My own ADHD is mild enough
that, if I meditate I’m able to focus and practice attention
and peripheral awareness in a balance. And that works
for me, but it’s hard work, and I need support, and I need resources and that kind of thing. Now, imagine you’re working 12-hour shifts again and again and again. There’s no support.
There’s stigma everywhere. Everyone’s telling you to suck it up. And then you have the public stigma, where people like Margot
Kidder are treated as crazy. It’s a no-win situation. The title of this is “What We Can Do to Help Our Colleagues.” Step one is listen to them.
Destigmatize it. Make it okay to say I have a problem and I need help. Change our licensing stuff. Allow for support from
employment assistance programs, our employers, et cetera, to
have time to actually treat, manage, and prevent mental illness. And then start early, like
pre-meds for doctor types in nursing school and all
that to say that this is not something you’re alone. You can have support and we’re
gonna change our culture. But it’s gonna take a
lot of us to do that. – There was a book I read
awhile back, and it was called, “A First-rate Madness,” and
sort of the thesis of the book was that the best leaders
are somewhere on the spectrum of mental illness because
they have higher levels of empathy or caring and understanding because they themselves have suffered. – [Z] Right. And then it’s often when you find mentally healthy leaders are leaders – [Tom] who do the most
harm in a population. Think of somebody like a George Bush. – [Z] (laughs) – You know what I mean? Or a Donald Trump, who’s mentally healthy, – [Z] Right. at least at his own diagnosis. – Well and then that’s right,
the intersection of art, creativity and mental illness. – [Tom] Right. – The people who go into healthcare are pretty creative types. Like, I’ll tell you, our
second year class play was… The amount of creativity
that came out of this group of UCSF medical students,
who, by the way, listen, these are not balanced people. These are not people who are
coming in this with a high degree of mental stability. These are the cream of the
crop of gifted students who are neurotic. They are
driven. They are pushed. All these other things. Then you throw’em in a room. My first year at UCSF,
I remember thinking, am I back in high school? These crazy, intense cliques would form. Everybody’s hyper-competitive,
but pretending not to be hyper-competitive. There’s a big, sort of performance anxiety and posture syndrome and all those things. It’s enough to break the
healthiest person’s mind. Now, you take people who
are already at the edge of creativity, intelligence… We did a show with Blair
Duddy on gifted kids… These guys are already
right at the edge, right, they’re pushing the limits. And you can easily push
them over the edge. Now, we have two people at
NYU, two medical people, a student, I think, and a
resident who died by suicide in the last couple months,
and everyone’s acting like this is such a surprise. This is exactly the
system that we’ve built that’s gonna generate this. And the fact that we don’t talk about it. One of our goals here on this
platform is to give a platform to these topics that no
one wants to talk about, that we all know is happening,
but we need to put it out to the world so that muggles,
non-medical people see it. Our policy-makers see it,
and our academics and people on the front lines see
it and go, you know what, tomorrow I’m gonna do something different. Or at least, it’s in my sub-mind now, I’m gonna ruminate on this and we’re gonna come up with something. – I guess something that I’ve
though about, reflected on for a long time is, and
I’ve admitted to myself, is that I’m not in control of my thoughts, like you were saying. You
know, like, these thoughts just arise like something
would arise in my body if there was a physical
problem with my body. If there were mentally
unhealthy thoughts that were, maybe societally we viewed
them as mentally unhealthy, right, that wouldn’t be my
fault, that would just be something that was arising for me. – That’s a huge step towards
understanding the stigma of mental illness, that thoughts arise. And not only that, but
loops of thoughts arise. And anybody who meditates
at all can see this. You’re quiet, you quiet
your mind and you see them just arising, like, just
clouds across the sky. And that’s why there’s been
a lot of research, actually lately on psychedelics going
back to psilocybin, LSD, high dose psychedelics,
MDMA, which isn’t technically a psychedelic, but it’s
close, under guided conditions people can actually
almost reboot their mind. And these ruminatory
patterns of unbidden thoughts and ruminations can actually
be broken and you actually get a thirty-thousand-foot
view for the first time. It’s equivalent to meditating
in a cave for 30 years, you know, having a guided
psilocybin experience at high dose, at least to hear people who’ve done it’s explanation. – [Tom] It’s so interesting,
too, because it is cultural. We put them in a box as mentally ill. This is just, sort of, their
reality, and their experience as a human being and we’re
putting them over here in the box as like, no, you’re malfunctioning. There’s this shamanic tribe,
and I forget where it is, like Papua New Guinea, or
something, and their name for somebody who’s
schizophrenic is, “one who walks with the dolphins.” And it’s
like, what does that mean? I don’t know, but they’re a
society that takes a lot of psychedelic drugs. So they’re
like, this dude’s having visions, he must be touched by the gods. He must know something we don’t know. Let’s listen to him. And he’s
revered in their society. You know what I mean? – It’s a whole different framing. It’s a whole different framing. And you know, somewhere in the
West we lost a bit of touch with that sort of aspect of
the spiritual, creative aspect of what we’re calling mental illness. Now that doesn’t mean that… So if you have that mindset
it’s very hard to function in our current society. ‘Cause you can’t get things done. You can’t organize your
thoughts, and of course there’s the extreme. Margot Kidder said that
when she had this break she was wandering. She wandered
into Downtown Los Angeles and was taken in by a
couple of homeless people who recognized her as someone
who’s fellow mental illness, and took care of her and protected her. And it goes to show that
sometimes game recognize game. If you suffer yourself, your
level of empathy and acceptance of others who suffer may be higher. So we could all do a little bit with that. Now, I’m not a big fan of empathy because feeling someone’s pain… If you felt a schizophrenic’s
mind, you would not tolerate it for long, and it would
actually lead to yourself you would burn out. You would
make incorrect decisions. You would believe some of the delusions. That’s why family members
with high empathy of people with mental illness can
suffer something called folie a deux, where they
share some of the delusions of the mentally ill family member because the empathy is tight. – [Tom] There’s a condition
tied to schizophrenia called allophrenia, where
you can actually start to hallucinate, yourself. – [Z] Ah. Interesting. And the idea, again is that
we are very suggestible, and that our mind is complex, and it is consisted of sub-minds
that are always feeding our awareness this data. We can improve those things. Medications, therapy, cognitive
therapy, talk therapy, just getting out of certain environments, set and setting. That’s why people who used
to drop acid in the 60’s sometimes would just have
horrible things happen because their set and setting was bad. In other words, their
mindset was bad going in, so now they’re open to
all this crazy stuff, and their setting, where they
were was not a non-paranoid inducing sort of setting. But in guided settings
with the right mindset, these might, we’re seeing
evidence that these drugs might help us understand even
the nature of mental illness and how the mind works. There’s a lot to do. So, Tom Hinueber, other thoughts? – Well, taking it back
to medical practitioners, there’s a lot of things that
are considered mentally healthy or normal, like staying up all night, – [Z] (laughs) – Or just clicking through
these boxes, never asking why you’re doing any of it. Shoving your own compassion,
empathy deep within yourself to just do the thing you need
to do to get through your day. And then we’re surprised when
people burn out and break. These are not normal behaviors. – [Z] We’ve set people
up in healthcare to fail. You know, there was a guy on Rogan, the sleep specialist from Berkeley, – [Tom] Right. Yeah, and he talked
about the origins of why residents stay up all night
can be traced to a doctor in the 1800’s who was a
cocaine addict and expected all his residents to keep pace with him. So he would stay up for 36 hours
’cause he was high on coke, and he expected his residents
to keep up with him. So the culture was set then
by a cocaine-addicted doctor, which is a mental illness in itself. Cocaine dependency is in the
DSM-5, right, as a disease. You’re now expecting
medical students to behave in this model, and it
persists to this day. Things are slowly changing, but we have to change them faster. Uh, what do you think, Tom Hinueber? – Cocaine’s a helluva drug. – It’s a helluva drug. – [Z] Cocaine is a helluva
drug. Charlie Murphy. So, guys, this is what you can
do to help raise awareness. First of all, people
who’ve donated to NAMI, the National Alliance on
Mental Illness, $230 raised from eight people. Thank you. Keep clickin’ that box. Do me a favor, hit “Share” on this thing. Share it with someone you care about. Frame it a certain way, like, “We need to destigmatize this.” That will go a long way. It also helps Facebook’s
algorithm to realize that our content is good and
just and needs to be shared, and helps it disseminate. I don’t know, ZPAC, we love you. Thank you for supporting
our AMA on Reddit, everything we do on Facebook, and for being a part of the tribe. Also, Logan just created a
“Make Medicine Great Again” line of merchandise. So, if you want to support our videos, go to shop.ZDogg.MD.com and
make medicine great again. I don’t know, Tom Hinueber,
what do you think? – There isn’t a single mental
illness that’s a weakness. They’re just a condition
in the human experience. – Normally the show ends with, “I hate you so much, Tom Hinueber,” but it’s hard to hate
you for saying something that actually makes sense, for a change. I hate Logan so much. – [Tom] He walks with the dolphins. – You dance with chickens, Logan Stewart. – [Logan] I do. I do, Z. – I love you, ZPAC. We out. (hi hop music) – What? Dancing with
chickens isn’t like, a thing? – [Logan] Gotta dance with chickens, Z. – I’d dance with… I’d
do the chicken dance. (hip hop music) – [Z] By the way, have you seen my… – Have you seen these? I walk around talking to
myself, wearing these, talking to Steve Jobs’ ghost. – [Tom] That’s a behavior
that’s considered normal that may not be.

Holistically Managing Mental Illness | Rick & Kay Warren


Kay: You may have just been diagnosed with
a mental illness, or you may have a family member who has just been diagnosed, and yet
your mind is full of thoughts. You might even be a little frightened, because that’s an
overwhelming diagnosis. We want to talk to you in this, about how to manage a mental
illness from a holistic perspective. Probably the very first thing from this diagnosis is,
your psychiatrist may have said to you that adding medication may be the very first thing
that you need to do. Taking medication for a mental illness, that can be very frightening.
You don’t know how you’re going to feel, you don’t know how it’s going to make you act,
you don’t know is it going to change you. It can really be a frightening thing.
Rick: Yeah, and as a pastor who studied the Bible for over 40 years, I can tell you this,
it’s not a sin to be sick. It’s not a sin to take medication. In fact, a lot of people
think that … they’re ashamed of taking medicine. Well, why? If my heart doesn’t work and I
take heart medicine; there’s no shame in that. If my liver doesn’t work and I take liver
medicine; there’s no shame in that. If my brain isn’t working work and I take medicine
for my brain; there’s no shame in that. There’s no stigma to that, it’s just part of being
a human being and living in a broken world. Kay: That’s what we want to talk about, is
how to manage mental illness in a holistic way. Sometimes people think if they go and
they get a diagnosis and somebody says, “Okay, here’s the illness that you have. Here’s the
medication that you have, and we also want you to involved in therapy.” Sometimes we
can think that that’s all that’s necessary. Sometime that’s good, sometimes taking medication
and being in weekly therapy dealing with your mind and dealing with your thoughts, is incredibly
… Rick: Your emotions.
Kay: Your emotions, is incredibly helpful, but that’s not all. You’re going to need to
work in some other area. There’s some other things that are going to add benefit to you
managing a mental illness. Rick: Yeah, you might even take it in layers.
You might start at the most basic level, which biological, and that is what’s wrong in my
body that needs some medicine. Then what’s wrong in my thinking that maybe needs some
straightening out of the way that I think. Of course, a good counselor can help you on
that. The Bible says, in the multitude of counselors
there is safety. In other words, it is wise to get advice from other people. People see
things that we don’t see. They can also help us interpret experiences in our life, like
trauma, abuse, difficulties that we’re been unable to even think about ourselves.
Kay: You mentioned physically, that things can go wrong inside our bodies that can lead
to mental illness. Also, there are things that you can do to control what happens in
your body. Meaning you and I are totally in control of how much sleep we get. You and
I are … Rick: Right.
Kay: Totally in control of how we eat. There are things you can adjust, your diet. Maybe
there’s some foods you need to cut, maybe there’s some food … if you’re just eating
Ho-Ho’s and coke every day for breakfast, there’s a good chance that’s probably not
going to help your mental health or your physical health. Really take a look seriously at what
you’re eating, how much sleep you’re getting, how much rest, how much physical activity.
When you add that physical component, it will have an effect on your mental health.
Rick: What we’re saying is that no mental health issue is simple; they’re all complex.
There’s a biological component that maybe require medicine, there is a physiological
component that could involve rest, exercise, and taking care of your body. There is a thought
component, which can involve helping interpret the experiences of life that make your illness
either worse or better. Then of course their relationships. Relationships have a profound
effect on our lives. Good relationships help us cope better with the natural problems we
have, bad relationships make it worse. Kay: Yeah, and we’ve found, because our son
lived with a mental illness for a very, very long time. In our family, and in our relationships,
we found that sometimes the relationship became strained; that mental illness caused there
to be some chaos, caused there to be some relationships that just didn’t work well.
As you’ve maybe just been diagnosed or you are a family member of somebody has, one of
the aspects in learning to manage mental illness in a holistic way is to approach relationships.
There may be some relationship repair that needs to happen, that will help you or help
your family member, as you guys cope with this diagnosis; this sometimes very frightening
diagnosis. We’re talking about what you can do take …
Rick: Let me say about that too. If you are a loved one of someone who’s struggling with
mental illness, and they have isolated you or they have had conflict with you or whatever
strain in the relationship; don’t take it personal.
Kay: Yeah, that reminds me. One of the best pieces of advice that we ever got, in helping
our son and in our family relationships, was to not take it personally and to listen to
the music, not just the words. Sometimes people who have mental illness say terrible things.
Let’s be honest, sometimes people, especially if they’re in a particular episode or if they’re
in a moment in which they’re struggling. Rick: They’re in pain.
Kay: They’re in deep pain, and they will say things, or you will say things that later
you go, “Why did I say that? I don’t mean that. These are people I love.” For us as
family members, we learned not to take it personally, to listen to what is, to what
his heart was not necessarily what his words were. That was a huge piece of advice for
us. Relationships in managing mental illness will have to addressed and helped.
Rick: Of course your relationship to God is a very important factor. The spiritual component
in mental illness, God has power that nobody else has. The Bible tells us that Jesus has
healing power in his words and in his life. Many years ago, probably 30 years ago, I went
through an entire year of depression. When I was going through that depression, one of
the many things I did, I took some medication, I went to see a therapist. I also read through
the Book of Psalms. As I read through the Book of Psalms, I underlines every verse that
had to do with depression or was a word on encouragement to me. I still have that Bible
30 years later. When I know someone who is discourage, somebody is going through a tough
time; I’ll often open that Bible and flip to those exact verses that helped me through
those painful days. Kay: Yeah, I would say if you are the person
who has just been diagnosed with mental illness or your family member, we cannot over-emphasize
how you’ve got to build yourself spiritually. There is a spiritual aspect and a spiritual
component. To be able to have a group, maybe just … maybe there’s just two or three verses,
you don’t have to have the whole Bible. You’ve got two or three verses that you can hang
onto in those moments when you’re feeling very low or the pain is so deep.
I don’t there’s a place in the Psalm’s, where the psalm says, “Darkness is my only companion.”
The people in the Bible, who wrote the Bible, really understand depression, understand pain.
Jesus understands it. Not only do you need to have that spiritual strength for yourself,
but line up some people who will pray for you. Some people who will promise, who will
commit to you that they will pray. There is this spiritual aspect that you’ve got to manage,
as we holistically manage mental illness. Rick: Part of the spiritual component in managing
mental illness, is to hold onto the promises of God. There are over 7,000 promises in the
Bible. I was talking to someone the other day who was struggling with schizophrenia.
He said, “The promise I will never leave you. I will never forsake you.” He said, “Got
him through his darkest days.” Those promises are there, that you could hold on to when
you can’t believe everything you think. You can’t believe everything you see, but you
can believe everything God says to you. The more you understand how much God loves you
unconditionally, that he sees, he cares, he knows, he grieves, and he can help; these
are the spiritual components that you need to hold onto.
Kay: Yeah. Just remember that you are not just your mind, you’re not even just your
emotions; you are a whole-being. You are a body, a soul, and a spirit. To manage mental
illness, don’t overwhelmed by it. Just … but to go after this approach to manage it with
medication, through therapy, through your body, how you take care of your body, the
relationships that may need to strengthened. Absolutely, at the very bottom line, is strengthening
your relationship with God. He is the best person of all to help you manage.

Timberline Financial ~ Personalized Debt Relief Programs


Like many Americans you may be having issues keeping up with your credit card bills. So many people these days are falling behind, continue to fall behind, or they just don’t see their credit card balances going down. In this tough economy, almost everyone has credit card debt, but few realize what it really costs. For example if you have $40,000 in debt, with an average interest rate of 15.9%, paying the minimum payments will cost you around $84,400 dollars over 31 years. That’s ridiculous! In a qualified Credit Card Modification Program, you are represented by team of skilled strategist and professional debt negotiators who will develop a plan to provide you with immediate relief from high monthly payments. In the short-term, this strategy may help to restore some financial stability in your life, while a team of professionals works to reduce the amount of your debt in the long run. Once you’re enrolled you’ll have your own dedicated savings account with an FDIC-Insured National Bank. This account is in your name only, and you’ll have full access to it 24-7. We cannot touch it without your approval. Our program is simple. You’ll have one manageable, monthly payment, and the funds will be transferred from your personal bank account to your new account on the day of the month of your choice. These funds will build monthly while our professionals negotiate with your creditors to resolve your account for the lowest possible amount. Bear in mind, paying less than you own your debts may result in taxable income to you when a settlement agreement is reached. The funds will be dispersed from your special purpose account securely to your creditor. This secure payment is tracked with a unique transaction number to ensure it is properly credited and fully documented. The funds in your account will also be used to pay our fees once we have earned them. Timberline Financial is a performance space company, which means you’re not charged any upfront fees or any monthly fees. Ourguarantee is simple, if we don’t settle your account, you don’t ever pay a fee on that account. One of the key benefits of our program is the option of full legal representation through the AmeriLit Legal Plan. This legal plan provides you with full legal coverage on your enrolled accounts with no deductible no co-pays and no limits. Your attorneys will assist you if creditors or debt collectors engage in illegal collection practices, and they can defend you in the unlikely event of litigation. There are many key benefits to our debt resolution program: No upfront fees. No monthly fees. You will always speak with a live person. One monthly payment. Complete legal protection when you sign up with AmeriLit, and the peace of mind knowing you are on the road to resolving your enrolled debts. The program may increase the amount of money you owe due to the accrual of fees, penalties and interest, however any such accrued fees, penalties, or interests are negotiated and resolved along with the principal amount of your debt at no additional cost to you. In fact, many people who enroll in this type of program are able to resolve their debt in 2 to 4 years. You’ll no longer be making your monthly payment to your creditors during the program. This will likely adversely affect your creditworthiness. Timberline Financial is respected throughout the industry. We are a member of the debt buyers Association, the American Fair Credit Council, and the International Association of Professional Debt Arbitrators. When you’re trying to reduce your monthly payments and resolve your debts as quickly as possible, you owe it to yourself to work with Timberline Financial.

Head, Neck, and Back Injuries

Head, Neck, and Back Injuries


“Elizabeth, are you okay?” “Elizabeth…” “…are you alright?” “Maria, go call 911 and then come back, okay?” “I might need your help.” “Elizabeth, are you okay?” “She must have fallen.” “That arm feels okay.” “She’s breathing.” “And she’s got a pulse.” “Elizabeth, can you hear me?” “Can you hear me?” “Maria, are they on the way?” “Okay, good, good.” So in this scenario, we had about a 12 year old female who fell at a height above her head, and she landed on a somewhat soft, but firm ground. This is gonna be something that’s gonna lead us to think about head, neck or back injury as we begin our assessment. I place a hand on the forehead, to make sure that I’m not moving the neck excessively. We’re making sure to check for the airway, breathing and circulation. In this case she was breathing, she did have a pulse. So we knew she was stable with airway, breathing and circulation. Skin color is good. Now we’re going to make sure that we’re checking the arms for obvious fractures and deformity. We’re feeling one side of the chest, and then the other. One side of the ribs, and then the other. Abdomen and then the other. Pelvis, hips, legs. And we see that there is no crepitus, which is crunching noises, and we also realize that there is no real deformity there, which tells me, probably she got knocked out when she fell, but we want to take precautions. We activated EMS and sent a reliable runner to call 911, and then to come back and let us know they’re on the way. And then in the mean time, as long as their airway, breathing and circulation is within a stable spot, we can then hold the head still, monitor the patient frequently, and wait for EMS to arrive.

Brain Injury: Intro to TBI Information and Crashing Minds

Brain Injury: Intro to TBI Information and Crashing Minds


Hello, my name is Gordon Johnson. You are
now on tbilaw.com, which is a webpage that I have had on the Internet since 1996. This
video is now being shot at a time that I have changed the title of tbilaw.com from the Brain
Injury Information page to Crashing Minds. Why the title Crashing Minds? Well Crashing
Minds is a book that I have been writing for the last couple years and it seemed like it
was time to incorporate some of the themes of that book in TBILaw.com which has hundreds
and hundreds of pages of information on it since I put it up in the mid 1990s. I use
the term crashing minds because the brain in a brain injury does crash in similar ways
to what your computer might do if you in fact overload it and/or did something to make it
crash. Now there’s no comparison to the devastation of a brain injury to a computer crash, but
as we begin to understand the way in which computers work, the average person now knows
what RAM is and a hard drive is, it becomes easier for me to explain similar processes
that happen inside the brain when there’s a brain injury. I’m not a doctor, I’m a lawyer. I’ve been
writing about brain injury virtually my entire career as a personal injury lawyer. These
pages have information I’ve learned on them , both when undertook the massive undertaking
to really understand brain injury when I became a brain injury specialist, but also what I’ve
learned from listening to you, the people with brain injury, my clients, loved ones,
family members of my clients, and the things that I’ve learned in the years of doing battle
with doctors who were hired by defense and insurance companies to basically deny that
anything we know to be true could be true. Tbilaw.com is really not like anything you’re
going to read in a medical book. It does have medical science as its primary basis, but
it’s not written like a doctor would write for another doctor, and it’s not written like
a brain injury survivor would write for another brain injury survivor. The goal is to combine
a technical understanding of brain injury with the communication skills both written
and verbal that I have developed in my career as both a journalist and a writer and also
as a lawyer, but to combine those things in a way where I can teach, I can inform, and
I can advocate. We hope that these pages are self-accrediting
to you that you will see yourselves, you will see your loved ones in these pages and through
them you will in fact get a better sense of what is ahead and what it is that you need
to learn, you need to do, to ensure the best recovery for you or your loved one. Throughout our web advocacy we have seen three
basic themes that come up. The questions come up over and over again. The first is someone
is in a coma, their loved one is in a coma, and the doctors are all saying, the only information
the doctors are giving is that you will just have to wait and see. Well predicting the
outcome of a coma while someone is still in a coma is a very very difficult thing to do,
there is legitimate information, and it’s a very important time for the family member
to learn as much as possible about brain injury. The second theme is that you suffered a concussion,
your family member had suffered a concussion, and the doctors are saying everything’s going
to be better, and when you are a week after the concussion, a month after the concussion,
that’s what you want to hear, and it may in fact be the case, but for a significant minority
of people, 10 to 15 percent of the people, that may not be the case, and the doctor’s
advice that everything will go away, don’t worry, you’ll be fine in six months, isn’t
always true, and for the significant subset, the significant minority of people, there
needs to be more information, there needs to be more assistance and more focus has to
be beyond long-term recovery and we’ve tried to address that issue. The third major issue is what is almost a
complete devoid of information about the long-term potential disability that can come either
after a severe brain injury or after concussion. In the concussion cases it is obvious why
that information isn’t given; because in concussion cases the doctors don’t think there could
be any disability, but remarkably there’s still very little information given about
the long-term consequences, long-term behavioral changes after a severe brain injury. In the
severe brain injury case there is this huge focus of care and attention in the first 90
days; hopefully it extends out for a year, but once you’ve gotten away from the neurosurgeon’s
care, once you’re outside of the requisite number of speech pathology visits or physical
therapy visits, then there’s very very little done given information provided and focus
on long-term recovery. We started a project called TBI Voices a little over two years
ago and we’ve offered almost daily installments of the voices of people who survived injury,
primarily severe injury, and what their life was like as they went through it and what’s
it’s like now. We are creating new pages as we go that incorporates what we’ve learned
from listening to the TBI stories on TBI voices to help people understand the future impact
of brain injury. To help them understand the long-term symptoms that they may suffer. We hope that you click on it. We hope that
you find what you need here. We hope that you will come back. We hope that you will
use tbilaw.com, crashing minds, as your troubleshooting guide for the challenges that are ahead for
those with brain injury.

How did Alma use a Chiasmus to focus on Christ’s Atonement? (Knowhy #323)

How did Alma use a Chiasmus to focus on Christ’s Atonement? (Knowhy #323)


In the Book of Mormon, the prophet Alma taught
the people of Gideon some important truths about the Saviors atoning sacrifice. To help make his point, Alma used a chiasm. This is a literary pattern where key words,
phrases, or ideas are repeated in reverse order. The center is typically the most important part. And at the center of Alma’s chiasm, he places emphasis on the truth that the Savior would suffer all of this “according to the flesh”. Alma described the Atonement in intensely
physical terms. His comprehensive list of things Christ would
take upon himself is comprised largely of physical suffering: pains, sicknesses, infirmities,
and death. But Alma also included the crucial, spiritual forms of suffering: temptations, sins, and transgressions. Alma’s use of chiasmus makes it clear that
Christ’s mortal nature the “flesh” was an essential part of His Atonement. It was His mortal nature that enabled Him
to suffer in Gethsemane, and to endure death at Golgotha. But Alma also taught that Christ’s mortal
experience itself His “going forth” and experiencing the “pains, afflictions,
and temptations” of mortality was a vital aspect of His atoning sacrifice. And now you know why

Broken Elbow — Repairing Elbow Fractures (Q&A)

Broken Elbow — Repairing Elbow Fractures (Q&A)


Hi. My name is Dr. Khurram Pervaiz. I am a shoulder, elbow and hand specialist with the Orthopedic Associates of Central Maryland and I work at Howard County General Hospital. Elbow fractures can happen after a fall. This could be a simple ground level fall, as in falling on the floor, or falling down steps or falling off a tree. You would have pain in your elbow, swelling, limitation in motion, you could have bleeding from the elbow, and if you have these symptoms, it would be… you should probably go see someone and
get an x-ray to make sure you do not have an elbow fracture. Going to the emergency room is
probably the best thing to do because in the emergency room they will
probably get an x-ray and find out if you have an elbow fracture and then probably send you to the right specialist. If you are suspicious that you have an elbow fracture, then it would be appropriate for you to make
an appointment with an elbow specialist so they can get x-rays, evaluate you thoroughly and decide whether this is something
that can be fixed with something simple like a cast or whether it’s something that needs surgery. Elbow fractures can be highly complex, technical injuries and frequently specialized training and technical expertise are required to put
these complicated injuries together with surgery. The most important thing in the elbow joint would be the
alignment of the joint itself or the articular surface. If the alignment of the joint has been
affected then it frequently has to be restored through surgery. If that alignment of the joint is okay then elbow injuries can be treated with something simple like a sling or a cast or just immobilization for a short period
time, however, the elbow is a joint that does not
tolerate immobilization very well, so immobilization is usually done for a short period of time to avoid permanent stiffness. Complications from elbow fracture surgery can range
anywhere from nerve injury to bleeding to infection, swelling and stiffness in the arm. Elbow fractures can take anywhere from
six weeks to three months to heal completely. I start therapy immediately because stiffness can be a problem. I don’t generally allow my patients to lift anything heavy with the arm and initially the most important thing
is to elevate the arm to minimize the risk of swelling, infection, and wound breakdown.

PoTS Explained & Chronic Illness Tips [CC]

PoTS Explained & Chronic Illness Tips [CC]


OMG, Ok… We are gonna have such double chin in this video… Oh dear… Hello lovelies! Welcome to my living room floor, it’s very attractive Also hilarious because my brother and I bought exactly the same rug without realising Point to you if you can guess where this rug is from I used to spend a lot of time on the floor- about 60% of the time. The other 40% was lying down in bed. My mother and I used to joke that I could recognise a place by its ceilings and it’s kind of true… I still spend a lot of time lying down but I’m a lot better now. I can sit up in the car rather than lying down on the back seat and I can actually hold my own head up Excellent! Also being able to hold my head up is quite a change… Also I can stand up for more than 2 minutes at a time without fainting. Genuinely, my life is amazing compared to what it once was and I still only leave the house twice a week! Normally when I’m stuck on the floor I don’t film because I can’t exactly set things up around myself I just generally feel pretty pants. Kind of hard for me to follow my train of thoughts I wanted to talk to you about why I’m on the floor so often since I know I’m not the only one and I hope it will help you explain to other people . what’s happening to you. So you can send it to them and be like Look! not just me! I am not the only one who lies down all the time I have a condition called PoTS, which is For some reason I can never remember that It’s related to my connective tissue disorder, which I’ve explained before, card above When a healthy person stands up their blood vessels contract and their heart rate increases slightly to maintain the blood supply to their heart and brain. My blood vessels can’t be arsed with that This is what happens to me Instead, all of my blood rushes down to my feet, turning them purple My heart races, my face goes white and- whomp!- I’m gone. Fainted on the floor. It takes about three seconds. If I stand up to quickly, obviously, not like every time If I stand up slowly we are ok Other symptoms include: I’m saying this so cheerly! “Other symptoms include…” I mean It’s not always that bad, things that can make it worse include being tired or ill If I have my period… The whole week on the floor And I can’t definitely not film in that week because lights Light kills me Even on days when I’m feeling at my tip-top best, I have to be very careful when I stand up If I do it to quickly, then whoosh I hit the floor Fortunately my wife has the world’s best reaction speed and she tends to just grab me very quickly Which is good otherwise there’d be blood and brains Even if is a really bad, lying down does help Specially for some reason, the floor A hard floor vs a soft bed Idon’t know why it just really helps me Sorry I’m blinking so much from these lights As do things like… Making sure I don’t get dehydrated because wow that’s bad Dehydration murders my brain If I could avoid my period I really would Actually it’s never even a week, it’s like 9 days. Who else has a 9 day period? Women’s issues… I can’t even have children so it’s a bit unfari They also exacerbate symptoms But fortunately I can’t eat them So I don’t, there you go I know the Chronic conditions may be all very different and have symptoms that are in no way similar it’s a whole spectrum as well But I think the life advice is generally the same Whatever kind of chronic illness or conditon you have Or even if you are someone who is suffering for something short term If it’s just an illness you are getting right now so Here are my tips, my 5 tips for living with a bad illness If you have a goal make sure it’s achievable. I’m not saying ‘make enough money to be entirely self sufficient and payed a maid’ isn’t possible It’s not, however ‘tango on the moon’ that might be I mean obviously please if that happens film it I need that footage That would make my year My life maybe Someone should do that No something that would make my life would be Fast and Furious I want to go to a Fast & Furious premiere Try not to fit too much into one day- don’t rush, there is always tomorrow. and if not tomorrow then next week looks pretty free. I talked about this in my spoons video. Learn to live within your limits and save some of yourself for later. No pushing. Save yourself, you don’t have to go all out If there’s a date in your diary that can’t be moved then resting beforehand is actually an active doing Equally, resting afterwards is doing because it’s recovering. No need to feel guilty. So technically you’re achieving things left, right and centre. I don’t care what you think you have to do. Drop it ok? You definitely won’t be able to do it when you’re too ill to form thoughts Stop now and you have a chance of recovering in good time. Do I follow my own recommendations? No Do I overwork myself and push for things that aren’t possible? Yes Yes Ido But I’m a work in progress. I’m just trying to get on with my life like everyone else Just got a few challanges But hey we all do! Just different, we’ll all get there in the end If you’re looking for more information then there is an amazing website called that has a ‘living with pots’ section and some really great suggestions and ideas of things! Also, ice cubes! I live in England and Istill get overheated and fail to maintain a normal body temperature I hope you enjoyed this video, hope you can take something from it Share it with a friend If you feel they needed Specially if they feel like they are all alone, and they are the one who just needs to lay down on the floor alone It’s not true, I am lying on the floor too Studying the celling… I should get more interesting lights in my house…

Searching for Home – European Refugee Relief

Searching for Home – European Refugee Relief


Every day we are
seeing the bomb. ISIS destroyed all areas. You didn’t know which time the
ISIS come– the government come to kill you. [NON-ENGLISH] They are take you, sells
you, buy you– it’s horrible. [NON-ENGLISH] We are refugees now, but we
didn’t choose to be refugees. No one want to be refugees. We don’t want to just survive. We want to live a real life. There’s a lot of need. There’s a lot of
difficult stories. Yet in these situations,
so many people have had such extreme hope
and resilience as well. And we’re responding at
all the different stops along the route in Greece. Samaritan’s Purse is there,
responding with distribution items, helping camps
with WASH, helping to build shelters and shades
in camps, shifting our focus so that we can respond
accordingly to the needs. We’re really trying
to show Christ’s love in whatever way we can here. It’s not just providing
shelter or non-food items, but right now it’s about
activities as well. So just being able to provide
music, a way for them to smile, to laugh, to maybe forget about
their trauma for a little bit, we’re happy to provide that. [NON-ENGLISH] When we reached the island,
we were very, very happy. You cannot imagine
how we were happy. I was crying as
much I was happy. But unfortunately
two, three days later, a lot of the borders closed. And we’re stuck here. We love life. We love music. We love things that
make you happy. [SINGING] This is like– make us
to remember our memories in Iraq, and in our home. When we were playing, we were
pretending that we were happy. They are playing the music. We all love. We are talking like
we are relatives. They are Yazidi,
and I’m a Muslim. We all love each other. We have to used to
live with each other. We are all one people. I have to all the
time to make myself, my husband, my neighbors,
my friend stronger. We are human. Just I want to– these
countries, to all people, to feel but little–
all these things. It is killing me. Samaritan’s Purse,
the volunteers from these countries,
they make me happy. And they gave us
really, really hope. And I feel that they feel us. Home is a place
that you feel safe, the place that you
are welcome there, the place that you
have your life there. This is not life. This is not home. Actually, I’m still
looking for home. So when this will
happen, I don’t know.

Should I Accept the Insurer’s First Offer in a Personal Injury Claim?

Should I Accept the Insurer’s First Offer in a Personal Injury Claim?


Hi my name is Christian Foyle, and I’m
the director of Foyle Legal, today’s topic is should I accept the first offer that
is made to me regarding a personal injury claim by the insurer In most cases the answer is no in this
area of law. insurers typically lowball you with a
low offer at the start of your claim, you should seek advice from a personal
injury lawyer before looking to accept an offer. Foyle Legal specialise in the
area of personal injury law, you can contact us on zero four zero eight seven
two seven three four three by email at [email protected] or
through our website foylelegal.com