How to put on a sling | Arm Sling | First Aid | iHASCO


A sling is used to stop the casualties are moving and to protect an injured upper arm wrist or forearm so it can heal. It’s also a useful warning to others that someone has an injury so they should be careful around them. There are two types of sling: an arm sling and an elevation sling. An arm sling is used for upper arm injuries, wrist injuries and rib injuries to hold the arm in a horizontal or slightly raised position. An elevation sling holds the arm in a higher position, with the casualties fingertips touching their shoulder. This type of sling is used to support the arm controlled bleeding and to reduce swelling. To make an arm sling this is what to do. Stand beside the elbow of the injured arm, ask the casualty to support their injured arm with the other hand. Gently slide the triangular bandage under their arm and over their shoulder. With the longest edge parallel to their body and the tip of the bandage sticking out past the elbow of their injured arm. Gently bring the end which is over their shoulder behind their neck to the opposite shoulder. Take the bit that’s hanging down over their arm and up to meet the other end at their shoulder. Tie the ends together at the hollow above
their collarbone and tuck in the ends. Adjust the sling so that it supports the
whole of their arm all the way to the top of their little finger. Twist the tip by their elbow until it fits snugly around their elbow and tuck it in or safety pin it. Check their circulation by squeezing their fingernail for five seconds, when you let go the colour should return within two seconds. If it’s too tight loosen the bandage and sling and tie them again. Keep checking every 10
minutes. To make an elevation sling this is what to do. Stand beside the elbow of the injured arm. Ask the casualty to support their injured arm so the fingertips of their injured arm touch their shoulder. This time lay the triangular bandage over the injured arm again with the long side parallel to their body and the tip of the bandage by the elbow of their injured arm. Wrap the bandage underneath their injured arm and take it diagonally across their back to meet the other end at their shoulder. Tie the ends in at the shoulder of their uninjured arm and tuck in the ends. Twist the tip of their elbow until it fits snugly around their elbow and tuck it in or safety pin it. Remember to check their circulation every 10 minutes.

Breastfeeding Relief for Nursing Moms

Breastfeeding Relief for Nursing Moms


Rachel’s Remedy consists of a detachable cloth that gets moistened under hot or cold water depending on the needs of the mother. It reattaches to a waterproof pouch Inside the pouch is a flaxseed filled pillow This goes in the microwave or the freezer. Once assembled it can be worn in any bra, it keeps clothes dry, and it keeps moms hands-free! Rachel’s Remedy gives women the ability to treat their conditions while getting on with their daily lives.

Tips for reducing the spread of illness

Tips for reducing the spread of illness


I’m Kelli Warner. We are still about two
weeks shy of the official start of winter, but there are some nasty
wintertime illnesses going around. Your best defense against getting sick is
keeping germs at bay. When December rolls around, Dr. Pilar Bradshaw and providers
at Eugene Pediatric Associates can count on one thing: a lot of sick kids. And what
happens is little kids at school get sick and then bring home the bugs to
their family. And it’s especially worrisome if you have a young baby in
your house. Illnesses circulating right now include influenza, respiratory
syncytial virus or RSV, which is a common and very contagious virus that infects
the respiratory tract in infants and young children. Doctors are also seeing
cases of croup, an infection of the upper airway which obstructs breathing and
causes a characteristic barking cough. Also going around: a severe stomach virus
and strep throat. Dr. Bradshaw offers parents a few tips on reducing their
children’s risk of getting sick. When you pick them up at school, have hand
sanitizer — immediately have them sanitize before they’re gonna eat a
snack in your car. As soon as you get them home, strip and dip them, I say. So
strip their clothes off and wash their hands and their face, because little
particles of germs are on their skin and on their clothing. To combat the spread
of germs, make regular hand-washing a priority for the entire family. Teach
your kids to cough into the crook of their elbow instead of into their hands,
and if you have a newborn or infant, don’t hesitate to ask friends and family
to wash their hands before holding or touching your baby. If you have a young
baby in your home, encourage the older kids to not kiss them right here in the
danger zone on the face. They can kiss them on the top of the head, on the hands,
on the feet, on the tummy. But try to avoid this area where so many germs get
in. Your best defense against illness is to keep your immune system strong. Taking
a daily multivitamin, getting adequate sleep, and eating a healthy diet all
help do that. In addition, regularly disinfect commonly touched surfaces like
doorknobs and countertops. A simple bleach and water solution has been shown
to be most effective in killing surface germs. Learn more
about that and other germ fighting tips at EugenePeds.com/HealthyKids.
I’m Kelli Warner.

Mouth Injuries in Toddlers | A Parent’s Guide

Mouth Injuries in Toddlers | A Parent’s Guide


What to do if your toddler inevitably
falls on their face – so, the mouth is actually the most common place for
injury and the mouth also is one of the most vascular areas of the body. So
when your child tends to fall on their face it is bloody but keep in mind it’s
blood mixed with spit. Many babies have this thing in between their two front
teeth which is called a maxillary frenum, or frenulum, and kids tend to fall
and bust it and the thing that I’d always tell parents, it’s gonna be bloody,
but they performed a surgery on themself. What I mean by that is, they
actually cut this little piece of soft tissue that’s in between their teeth
that’s causing the teeth to stay apart, so once kids inevitably fall those teeth
tend to actually come together, and kids are miraculous little creatures that
heal themselves, so some kids bump their teeth actually up but they re-erupt on
their own and so there’s not really any intervention that needs to happen. The
things to remember whenever your child does fall on their face is: one, apply
pressure, you want to stop the bleed, something to keep in mind is blood
mixed with spit looks like blood so even though the bleeding may have stopped
their spit may still look red. Two, you may want to give some over-the-counter pain
medication, it could be either ibuprofen or Tylenol but the thing you want to
avoid is that numbing gel, that numbing gel wears off very quickly and it’s easy
to overdose on. Three, it’s time for extra snuggles – it’s gonna hurt so it’s a good
time to give an extra hug. If you have any questions feel free to contact your
local dentist. You will want to get an x-ray of that mouth within about a week
to make sure that developing smile is still looking beautiful.

Seizure: What to Do | 60 Second First Aid

Seizure: What to Do | 60 Second First Aid


(dramatic music) – There are all sort of seizures and they can result from
a huge number of causes. Generally it’s because
of a reduced blood flow to the brain and that can
be for all sorts of reasons including cardiac arrest. If someone’s having a seizure, protect their dignity
and protect their safety. Time the seizure. Keep them safe, so support
and protect their head. Don’t restrain them in any way and if the seizure lasts for
longer than five minutes, make sure you get an
ambulance on the way fast. When the seizure stops, check
to see if they’re breathing. If they’re not breathing, start CPR, if they are breathing, put them in the recovery position to protect their airway and get an ambulance on the way if you’re concerned for any reason at all.

A new way of rolling someone into the recovery position

A new way of rolling someone into the recovery position


– Hello, I’m Emma Hammett from First Aid for Life
and onlinefirstaid.com, and I wanted to let you know
about a new recovery position or a new option for the recovery position that’s been developed by
Professor Keith Porter, and makes it easier for
people who are helping someone when they suspect they
might or could possibly have a spinal injury and you’re a solo person or trying to help. So if you are on your own and you suspect that somebody could have a spinal injury but you still need to roll
them into the recovery position because you’re worried about their airway, this might well be a
great solution for you. We will attach a video
showing it in detail below and I’ll also attach a link to our blog, which explains far more about it. But in essence, what you are doing is you’re using their hand, and you’re sliding their
hand under their head, you’re minimising any
movement as you very carefully lift their head to slide
their hand underneath, and then when you roll them, you’re rolling them onto their arm which actually keeps their
head far more engaged, it’s a much easier way, I think. I’d love to know your
feeling about it as well. So you start by crossing
their far leg towards you, much easier to see in a proper video where we’re demonstrating, and then you are rolling
them onto their arm. So you’re sliding their head, which actually puts their head into a more neutral position anyway, just lifting it slightly off the floor. And then you’re avoiding that twist and protecting them as they go over. So personally I think it’s a
much easier and simpler version than you trying to roll them
into the recovery position the old way, it also
is a little bit easier to support their head, generally, and it means that you don’t
need a whole row of people. Now obviously, if you have
got the luxury of having a whole row of people
who are trained to do a proper, formal spinal recovery position then that will be more
stable and a better way of rolling them, but if you haven’t, please have a look and let
me know what you think. Thank you, Keith Porter. So please put your comments below, and if you think it’s useful,
share it with other people and they might benefit from it too. That’s Emma Hammett,
from First Aid for Life and onlinefirstaid.com.

Seizure First Aid PSA with Zachary Quinto & Chris Pine

Seizure First Aid PSA with Zachary Quinto & Chris Pine


If someone has a seizure, do you know what
that is my line
then say it If someone has a seizure Do you know to do? First off never ever put anything in their mouth. Never. Stay with them until the seizure ends. The seizure would probably lasts only a few moments. Make sure they’re comfortable and safe. Turn them on their side sure. Make sure their head is protected. Best thing you can do is to be a friend.
Talk about it. Talk about it! You want to hear more from me and my friends download my podcast talk about it or visit epilepsy com

First Aid: Adult CardioPulmonary Resuscitation | First Aid

First Aid: Adult CardioPulmonary Resuscitation | First Aid


This was video was created in partnership with: First Aid Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation – Adult In this video, you will learn how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiac arrest in an adult First Aid techniques: 1 – State of consciousness? If the person loses consciousness, call for help if you are alone Lay them on their back 2 – Normal breathing? Check that the casualty is still breathing by placing one hand on their forehead, and the fingers of your other hand beneath the tip of their chin Gently tilt their head back and lift their chin to open their airways If you see no breathing movement, hear nothing, nor feel their breath on your cheek the casualty is not breathing 3 – Alert the emergency services Call the emergency services and, only if there is one nearby, go and fetch a defibrillator 4 – Defibrillator? If there are other people around you, ask someone else to fetch a defibrillator 5 – Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In the absence of a defibrillator, or whilst waiting for someone to arrive with one, begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation To do this, place the heel of the palm of your hand in the middle of the casualty’s bare chest Place your other hand on top of this hand, and interlock your fingers Position yourself directly above their chest with your arms straight Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation 30 Chest compressions Press down on the chest to a depth of between 5-6cm (2in) with both hands, Maintain a rhythm of 2 compressions per second 2 Rescue breaths Alternate 30 chest compressions with 2 rescue breaths, but only if you know how to do them Or Chest compressions Otherwise perform chest compressions only If you perform mouth-to-mouth breathing, do not forget to tilt the head back before each rescue breath and be sure to check that the casualty’s chest inflates Continue cardiopulmonary resuscitation without stopping until: the victim begins to breathe normally, or the emergency services arrive, or a defibrillator is brought to the scene Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation In the first minutes immediately after cardiac arrest, the victim may breathe weakly or take irregular, noisy gasps These are known as gasps and should not be confused with normal breathing.

How to Treat an Asthma Attack | First Aid Training

How to Treat an Asthma Attack | First Aid Training


If you’re with someone who’s having an asthma
attack, the best thing for you to do is to stay calm and to help them out. Have them sit down. Sitting is the best position for them, rather
than lying down. Find their inhaler. Often times they will have it on their person,
or nearby. Give it to them to administer their own medication. It’s easier for them to do. They’re used to doing it, they know how to
do it, they know when to breathe in to get the medicine into their lungs. Sometimes people will try to help and they’ll
just spray, spray, spray, and it’s not in time with breathing. Don’t be alarmed by how many puffs the person
is taking. It may be more or less than you’re used to
seeing them take. Just let them do it and stay with them, reassure
them, keep them safe. If their breathing does not return to normal,
or if they’re having increased difficulty in breathing, call 911 and get help right
away.

What To Do If Someone Is Having A Diabetic Emergency – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance

What To Do If Someone Is Having A Diabetic Emergency – First Aid Training – St John Ambulance


Diabetes is a long-term medical condition, where the body cannot produce enough insulin. Sometimes people who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar level either becomes too high or too low. Both conditions are potentially serious and may need treatment in hospital Hyperglycemia is where the blood sugar levels are quite high, it may be cause by a person with diabetes who has not had the correct dose of medication, may have eaten too much sugary or starchy food, or they may be unwell with an infection. A person with hyperglycaemia may have a medical warning bracelet. Warm dry skin A rapid pulse and breathing Fruity, sweet breath Extreme thirst Or drowsiness, leading them to become unresponsive if not treated. This is also known as a diabetic coma. Call 999 or 112 for emergency help and say you suspect hyperglycaemia. While you wait for help to arrive, keep checking their level of response. If they become unresponsive at any point, open their airway, check their breathing and prepare to treat an unresponsive casualty. Hypoglycaemia is where the blood sugar levels are too low. It can be caused by the level of imbalance between the level of insulin and the level of glucose in the blood. If a person who is receiving treatment for diabetes misses a meal or takes part in a lot of exercise, their blood sugar level will fall On rare occasions, low blood sugar levels can occurs after binge drinking or after having a seizure or epileptic fit. People who suffer from diabetes may recognise when a hypogycaemic episode is coming on or starting, or know that they need to eat something to bring their blood sugar level up. They may have their own blood testing kit to check their blood sugar level, but sometimes they may fail to recognise their symptoms in time and without help they may quickly become weak, confused and unresponsive. A person with very low blood sugar – hypoglycaemia may have a medical warning bracelet. Weakness, faintness or hunger. Confusion, show irrational behaviour Sweating with cold, clammy skin A rapid pulse Palpitations Trembling or shaking Or maybe less responsive to you. If you suspect hypoglycaemia, help the person to sit down If they have their own glucose gel or glucose tablets, help them to take them. If not, you need to give them something sugary, such as a 150ml glass of fruit juice or non diet fizzy drink, 3 teaspoons of sugar or sugar lumps or sugary sweets. For example 3 jelly babies. If they improve quickly, give them more of the sugary food or drink and let them rest. If they have their blood glucose testing kit with them, help them to use it check their blood sugar level and stay with them until they feel completely better. If they do not improve quickly, look for any other reason why they’re unwell and then call 999 or 112 for emergency help. Do not give them anything to eat or drink as they may choke. While waiting, keep checking their level of response. If they become unresponsive, open their airway, check their breathing and prepare to treat an unresponsive casualty. So remember, if they have hyperglycaemia, high blood sugar levels, call 999 or 112. If they have hypoglycaemia, low blood sugar levels and are alert, give them a 150ml sugary drink or 3 jelly babies. Sit them down and let them rest. If you’re unable to give them this and they don’t improve quickly, call 999 or 112 for emergency help. And that’s how you help somebody who is having a diabetic emergency If this video has been helpful to you, help support St John Ambulance by going to sja.org.uk/donate