Xilmordas – Spider Song

Xilmordas – Spider Song


Tiny critters of shadow as far as eyes can see Eight-legged nightmares running a killing spree I see them now as they scan for flesh Flesh that I provide with a scent so fresh Their appetite is intense and difficult to seduce Bodies of the innocent that fell victim to my ruse I succor my children with an heat so satisfying I’ve reached fulfillment of life, that remains undying Come little spider, out to feast, spin and crawl Come little spider, running down the dirty wall Here they come, arachnids of death, to take your souls Here they come, my hellish pets, to drain your balls The feast of death, nothing goes to waste I watch and laugh, as they run the chase Without me, they screech in hunger Without them, I am bound by restless slumber The time of feeding is drawing nigh A considerably amount of humans led to die They cast their hate and threw their stones Signing a future of bones and groans. Come little spider, out to feast, spin and crawl Come little spider, running down the dirty wall Here they come, arachnids of death, to take your souls Here they come, my hellish pets, to drain your balls Come little spider, out to feast, spin and crawl Come little spider, running down the dirty wall Here they come, arachnids of death, to take your souls Here they come, my hellish pets, to drain your balls Come little spider, out to feast, spin and crawl Come little spider, running down the dirty wall Here they come, arachnids of death, to take your souls Here they come, my hellish pets, to drain your balls Come little spider, out to feast, spin and crawl Come little spider, running down the dirty wall Here they come, arachnids of death, to take your souls Here they come, my hellish pets, to drain your balls Come little spider, out to feast, spin and crawl Come little spider, running down the dirty wall Here they come, arachnids of death, to take your souls Here they come, my hellish pets, to drain your baaaaaaaaaaaaaaalllllllllls!

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : General Allergic Reactions

First Aid for Anaphylaxis : General Allergic Reactions


Allergic reaction is nothing more than your
bodies? response to a foreign substance, this called an allergen. Allergic reaction can
be caused by any number of things. Basically, anything can cause an allergic reaction. Some
examples that I have on screen here are the four different ways that you can be exposed
to allergic reaction. One of them over here is skin contact through a plant, through animal,
through pollen or through latex are all ways the common allergic reactions happen. Another
way is through injection either through a needle at a hospital setting or through a
bee sting or any type of insect bite can also trigger an allergic reaction. If you ingest
something such as food, medication, nuts and shells are very common. Several people have
shell allergies and also to peanuts. Another one is through inhalation through pollen,
dust, mold mildew and animals. I am sure everybody has someone that they know that has an allergic
reaction of some sort and this is just overview of some of the things that can cause it.

Upper Neck Pain or Back Pain? Simple stretches for instant relief [UPDATED VIDEO]


This is an update of the video I created about
two years ago that now has over 700,000 views and 700 comments.
Hello livelies, hope you are doing well today. So a few years ago, I did a video on upper
neck and upper back pain. I had no idea that what I was creating was going to be such
a major hit. I mean, of course it’s amazing and I love
it, and I am still very grateful for it, but in the last two or three years, not exactly
sure when I recorded it, I have gotten a ton of feedback; I have gotten some negative
comments for sure. Mostly positive comments and also some really good feedback
So I wanted to re-record this video and update it with the new knowledge that I have, and
help you relieve your upper neck and upper back pain.
All you need is a small pair of dumbbells. Really it is not necessary. It is helpful,
but I don’t want that to be an excuse for you.
So let’s do this upper back and upper neck stretching and strengthening video that will
help relieve any sort of pain
you have in there.  
Ok! So, how did you like that video? How are you feeling?
I really want you to take a little physical inventory of how your body, how your upper neck or how your back feels right now.
As I was saying throughout the video you have to make sure that you tune into your
body. This is a video that I am making for a lot
of people; I don’t know you specifically. So if you feel any pain like “not good” pain,
then maybe this isn’t the video for you. Maybe you should seek out some professional assistance,
where they can actually touch, manipulate, and help you with the sort of issues that
you have back there. So I would love to
hear how you are feeling in the comment section
below. How is your neck and back feeling? Maybe if you saw the other video, I’ll link
below as well, you can see what is different with how you feel.
Remember, drinking water is a huge component of not having tight muscles.
So make sure that you drink your water. Write
these workouts down. Favor this video, like it and then you can come back to it anytime
you are feeling the stress rise up in your life, and you want to relax your upper back
and your upper neck. Alright, as I say in every video if you are
not having fun, it is your own damn fault. Alright, I will see you next week. Bye!

Park Christian Science Fair


WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT MUSIC CAN HELP MAKE YOU MORE INTELLIGENT! THAT’S ONE OF THE THINGS WE LEARNED TODAY AT THE PARK CHRISTIAN SCHOOL SCIENCE FAIR. 86-STUDENTS… SEVENTH, EIGHTH, AND TENTH GRADERS… GOT THE CHANCE TO SHOW OFF THEIR WORK THIS AFTERNOON. MANY OF THE PROJECTS CONCERN HEALTH ISSUES… LIKE THE EFFECT OF POP ON TEETH, OR WHAT CAUSES MOLD. THE WINNER OF THIS COMPETITION — SARAH ANN HERLIHY — DID AN EXPERIMENT WITH MUSIC… TESTING 36-RANDOM NOTES ON THE SCHOOL CHOIR… THE D-G-F BAND… AND THE MOORHEAD HIGH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. “JUST BECAUSE THEY WERE ABLE TO NAME THOSE NOTES, THEIR BRAIN WAS AUTOMATICALLY MORE DEVELOPED THAN NON-MUSICIANS. AND SO IN SCHOOL, IT HELPS THEM IN OTHER AREAS; IT HELPS THEM IN CURRICULUM SOURCES THAT NO OTHER CLASSES CAN DO TO DEVELOP THE BRAIN”. HERLIHY SAYS HER STUDY SHOWS MUSICIANS HAVE HIGHER GRADE-POINT- AVERAGES… DO BETTER ON S-A-T TESTS… AND HAVE HIGHER SELF ESTEEM.

Hagel and Fracture Lines in the GOP

Hagel and Fracture Lines in the GOP


PAUL JAY: Welcome to The Real News Network.
I’m Paul Jay in what is today a rather happy Baltimore. Now joining us from Washington, D.C., is Matt
Welch. Matt is editor in chief of Reason magazine. He’s coauthor with Nick Gillespie of the book
The Declaration of Independents: How Libertarian Politics Can Fix What’s Wrong with America,
and also the 2007 biography McCain: The Myth of a Maverick. Thanks for joining us again, Matt. MATT WELCH: Thanks so much for having me.
And congratulations. JAY: So the hearings over Hagel’s nomination
as secretary of defense have revealed many of the fracture lines within the Republican
Party. Can you give us sort of a map of how you see the different centers of that power? WELCH: Yeah. As regards foreign policy in
particular, you have a basic fight or divide in the Republican Party. Maybe there’s three
camps. There’s broadly two. The one that is the most dominant and was
attracting the most headlines during the Hagel hearings, as embodied by John McCain and Lindsey
Graham and Ted Cruz, actually, is the kind of post-9/11 neoconservatism or just very
hawkish interventionism. That is the same position, for the most part, that Mitt Romney
took throughout the election. It’s always talking about America can’t be apologizing
for anything, and anytime there’s something bad happening in the world, it’s a sign of
American weakness if we’re not actively doing something about it, even if we don’t know
what that something should be, aside from dropping a bomb or two. And I know that sounds
cynical, but I’m cynical about these people. So this has been the dominant strain. There’s a rising minority faction within the
Republican Party. A lot of it overlaps with the Tea Party, which means Ted Cruz becomes
an interesting figure. But it’s more embodied by Rand Paul, son of Ron, who–Ron’s a principled
noninterventionist; Rand is a pragmatic, let’s say, foreign policy realist leaning towards
noninterventionism. This group is growing. There are people who are willing [incompr.]
Republicans for the first time in a generation, beginning with Rand Paul, but now embodied
by people like Justin Amash in the House, who were talking about military spending as
a problem. They’re turning around to their Republican colleagues and saying, you need
to cut military if you are at all serious about cutting the size of government; and
U.S. foreign policy can’t be in charge of the world everywhere we go, it’s just ridiculous;
you need to subsume the president under the will of the Congress at least somewhat; and
these types of things. So that body is growing. Chuck Hagel isn’t
necessarily part of them, but he’s a foreign-policy realist. So that is more copacetic with the
more noninterventionist new wing of the Republican Party. Then there are people–Jim DeMint, who used
to be in the Senate and now is heading up Heritage Foundation, which itself is a pretty
interesting maneuver, people who are hawkish their whole lives, but they’re–kind of have
grown disaffected, certainly with the Afghanistan War, and also the Iraq War. So those people,
they’re kind of wobbling. So when we’re talking about a battle for the
soul of the modern GOP, it’s going to be a lot about how those people wobble. Are they
going to wobble in the direction of saying, hey, look, let’s get to more of a candidate
George W. Bush position, which was talking about a humble U.S. foreign policy and no
more nation building and these types of things? Or are we going to be stuck in this more neoconservative
McCain, Joe Lieberman, and Lindsey Graham type of thing? So the Hagel nomination was a great way for
the president, Barack Obama, to kind of, you know, present that divide and stoke it a little
bit, because it’s Republican-on-Republican violence, for the most part. And going forward,
it’s going to be very interesting to see which of these coalitions gather more steam. I think
still the dominant lingering post-9/11 strain is still the largest by far. But it’s definitely
losing in overtime. JAY: And how does it break down within the
Tea Party members (I guess most of them are in the House, some in the Senate) other than
Rand Paul? ‘Cause in the Tea Party you have a reflection of some of the same division,
as you were talking about, the bit of a crossover. But many of the Tea Party members are really
on the neocon foreign-policy page, and a few are on the more libertarian page. WELCH: It’s very, very interesting. Rand Paul
is specifically trying to–he always called himself a Tea Party Republican. That was the
name of his first book. It wasn’t about libertarianism–back then, he was sort of running away from that
word, although he’s embraced it since. He wants to make the claim to the Tea Party
and tell them, hey, look, you’re organizing animus against government has to include the
military [incompr.] He wants to make that a reality. And he’s giving a big talk this
week at the Heritage Foundation, precisely sketching out how this vision of a foreign
policy going forward will work. So it’ll be very interesting to watch. But the Tea Party was never about the military.
They all agreed to not talk about potentially divisive issues. For instance, immigration
has not been part of a Tea Party thing so far. It was just about the size of government
and the scope of government in terms of spending and activity, not in terms of taxes. So it’s
an unanswered question. So you have people like Ted Cruz, who’s a
complete flag-waver hawk out there who is really taking a lot of the strongest punches
on Hagel. Well, he’s considered a Tea Party favorite. Libertarians like talking about
him when it comes to fiscal policy. But then you have people like a Justin Amash,
Thomas Massie, who’s a new guy in Kentucky. These guys are principled noninterventionists
who are much more–you know, they’re further out than Rand Paul in terms of opposing these
things, and they’re very, very good on civil liberties, as Rand Paul has been, too, in
terms of the war on terror. So it’s a split right now, and that is part
of the ongoing divide. I think Mike Lee is much more of a skeptic
on the side–Senator Mike Lee from Utah–on the side of Rand Paul. Marco Rubio, on the
other hand, is more hawkish, like Ted Cruz. So they’re divided there for sure. JAY: Now, when I interviewed Rand Paul in
the primaries in–I was in New Hampshire in 2008–he told me that he thought the Libertarian
Republicans had more in common with the antiwar Democrats like a Kucinich and others than
they did with the neocons like Bush. But when it came down to it, when he ran himself for
the Senate, he accepted money from Karl Rove’s organization. When it came to the presidential
elections just passed, he supported Romney, who, as you just mentioned, is clearly more
on the page of these neocons that he said he was so against. So when push comes to shove,
does his own partisan career interests trump whatever he believes? WELCH: I don’t believe so, and here’s why.
On his first day in the Senate, he said something that I hadn’t heard a Republican say in 20
years–and this was a campaign promise. Right after telling Democrats, you cannot keep entitlements
as is, you’re going to need to cut them, he turned to Republicans and said, you cannot
keep military spending and foreign-policy adventurism the way it is. He has been very principled. He tried to introduce
the Iraq Deauthorization Act. This is very important and, I think, very little understood
by people. On September 14, 2001, there was the Authorization of Force Act, which is this
blanket sort of blank check for the president to conduct a war type of foreign policy. That’s
what enables drone strikes to go everywhere; it’s under this authorization act. Rand Paul
was the one–not necessarily a Democrat out there, although there are some good ones like
Ron Wyden–who said, no, we need to deauthorize that, we need to get rid of that blank check
out there [incompr.] What he’s trying to do is get the messages
from his father which are totally unpalatable to a broad swath of Republican thinking and
make it palatable. He’s going to argue most of the same principles on Sean Hannity’s show
and get called back. He’s running for president in 2016 for sure–it’s already happening–and
he’s getting a respectful hearing in places that his father couldn’t go. And he’s doing
that by tempering his language more than actually tempering votes. I mean, [incompr.] supporting Mitt Romney.
He did that after his father was going to lose. Of course he would have supported his
father if he was doing that. And he did that so he could speak at the Republican convention,
where he gave–for the first time, again, in a generation at a Republican convention–at
least a couple of good paragraphs saying, you’ve got to cut military spending, and you’ve
got to scale back adventurism abroad, and you have to respect civil liberties while
you’re doing this. So you can look at it as, like, Rand Paul’s
big fat sellout, or that he is finding a way to talk to people and organizations in order
to affect the whole of the party. I mean, think about this. Mitch McConnell,
Kentucky senator, he is the one who supported Rand Paul’s opponent in the primary and got
his hat handed to him. Now Mitch McConnell has hired Ron Paul’s longtime political capo
in Washington, Jesse Benton, to help run his campaign in Kentucky. So the Paulite influence
is much stronger in some ways in the Republican Party right now than it was when Ron Paul
was still in Congress, which is a very interesting thing. Rand Paul is the guy to watch, and also the
guy to keep checks on. He made, I think, a silly comment the other day about how an attack
on Israel is an attack on America, and he got rebuked, and he’s been backtracking since
then. JAY: But that’s sort of paying his dues and
positioning himself. But it’s the kind of positioning. Then you start to wonder: well,
you can position, position, position till you don’t have a position anymore, if you
know what I mean. WELCH: Yes. And so it’ll be interesting, again,
to see what he says this week at his Heritage speech and how he puts this. He’s wrapping
a lot of this into a separation of powers issue, which is a bit clever, saying that
basically the president has unchecked authority and the need to restore the constitutional
checks and balances on what he does. And he’s trying to present it as more of a third way.
It’s like, you know, we–you know, on one side, you have people who think we should
of course have 900 military bases abroad and muck into everything. And on the other side
are people who think that we shouldn’t be anywhere and we should completely, you know,
draw up our bridges [crosstalk] JAY: Where do you expect him to be on the
Hagel vote, then? Because if, as you said, Hagel at least is closer to his view of how
U.S.–the United States should operate in the world–yet there’s going to be enormous
pressure on Rand Paul by the neocons to vote against Hagel. WELCH: I would be really surprised if he voted
against Hagel. I mean, first of all, I would be surprised if Hagel doesn’t win, get the
nomination, even though his performance in the hearing was desultory by anybody’s, I
think, analysis of it. I think he’s going to pass through. So it would really surprise
me if Rand Paul was part of a rearguard action to try to take him out, although who knows,
ultimately. He is trying to play ball with Republicans while still be able to get his
message through. So far there haven’t been many cases that I’ve seen where his actual
votes have been in a direction that one would find offensive if one was more of a principled
noninterventionist. He has done–some votes have been criticized there, but it would surprise
me if he would vote against Hagel on those grounds, on grounds that he’s insufficiently
hostile towards Iraq or Iran and Hezbollah and these types of things. That would genuinely
surprise me. JAY: So, just quickly, just Hagel’s performance,
I mean, it occurred to me that one of the reason Hagel didn’t have a more vociferous
fight with McCain is that the Obama administration itself has picked up some of this rhetoric
about the success of Iraq just to kind of, I guess, buy into the patriotic fervor of
it all and the fact that Obama then had to manage that war. I mean, Obama and most of
the people around him were critical of the surge at the time, and I think most analysts
who have looked at the surge say the surge itself wasn’t really the thing that made the
difference; it was the Sunni tribes turning on the al-Qaeda forces for their–mostly for
their own reasons. But if Hagel took up that and really unraveled that and said what he
really thought, it wouldn’t be just McCain he’d be arguing with; he’d actually be puncturing
some of Obama’s narrative. WELCH: Yeah. I think that’s a clever way of
looking at it. And you can feel him just sort of defrock up there, like, just defang, trying
to talk his way out. And I think also that’s been maybe part of the Obama project of if
there’s going to be a fight on this, let’s have it, you know, between Republicans and
not between Democrats and Republicans. But I think it’s also to point out something
else, which is uncomfortable, I think, for a lot of noninterventionists to grapple with,
which is that the school of foreign policy broadly thought of as realism is inherently
unsatisfying. It does not resonate inherently with the American people when it’s not talking
about cutting back our overall size in the military, getting troops out of Germany, getting
troops out of Korea. All that stuff is popular, right, and broadly popular. And I think that
there is an available politics for people like a Rand Paul who kind of go after that
and stress that stuff. But realism as applied to a massacre happening
on the ground right now is not very popular, it’s not very emotionally satisfying, because
it’s basically saying we can’t do everything, and people are going to die while we do not
a lot. And that’s a tough thing to really emotionally grapple with, and it requires
a certain type of sensitivity and communication skills which I think we can say conclusively
that Chuck Hagel lacks. So realism’s a hard sell. And that’s one of the reasons, you know, we
like to think that it’s always–it’s these nefarious lobbies that are influencing everything.
And lobbies have their role. But there are things that are broadly popular in the American
body politic. And to talk in a way that is contrary to parts of those things, it requires
a certain skillset, and I don’t think Hagel had it. JAY: Alright. Thanks very much for joining
us, Matt. WELCH: Thank you. Appreciate it. JAY: And thank you for joining us on The Real
News Network.

Dog First Aid : Tips for Treating Kennel Cough in Dogs


What do you do if you fear that your dog has
come down with kennel cough? A
common sign of kennel cough is a hacking cough that your dog would exhibit. It sounds almost
like they are trying to clear their throat. A mild case you will have some hacking, throat
clearing action from the dog. You might have a slightly high temperature and you might
have a little bit of lethargy. If the case of kennel cough is more severe, the dog might
actually hack up phlegm. As it is coughing, it is hacking up phlegm. More serious cases
can result in hospitalization for the dog. So how do you manage this? What do you do?
If your dog is coughing and the cough is persistent and it is especially worse at night, one thing
you can do is give your dog cough syrup. So how do you give your dog cough syrup? You can different size syringes; this one
here goes up to 1/2 tablespoon.

Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six (1995) – Choppy Video in Windows 95 VirtualBox Guest


Sorry about not including a more user experience-oriented soundtrack. But I didn’t want to muddle the issue with extraneous information. Admittedly, this is the first actual 3D game I’ve tried with my Windows 95 VirtualBox guest (running in a Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit host). I’ve run Ripper, Daryl Gates’ Police Quest: SWAT, King’s Quest 7 and a couple other games in it and, barring some old-school IRQ/DOS-type configuration needs…they’ve all run beautifully. They are not actual 3D games, though… …and this is where the lack of so-called Glide support and perhaps other kinds of 3D game support factors in. But since I’m having a problem not just with the actual 3D portion of the game but with the 2D video playback I was hoping that by tackling the one…I might at the same time get some insight into how to deal with the other. “The Global C-C-C…krrrr…C-Computer Nets” I suppose I could have edited it down without the torture of the whole intro…but bear with me. “I appreciate ya.” “The M-M-Muh…money shot” Stay with me… Just going to load up the first tutorial “kill zone” environment… But, first…an options check to help the curious… I freely admit that checking the graphics quality of older games is a sketchy process…but I swear to you…they aren’t supposed to be THIS blocky and malformed. You can see what the sky is supposed to look like…as well as an idea of the textures for the environment. This is supposed to be a targeting reticle, not a brick on a plane of bricks… It’s the sky that really miffs me… :/ Apparently, hitting ‘delete’ changes your magazine…even though you’re full. In any case…that’s the state of things. The 2D video stutter issue and the blocky 3D graphics (that I totally expect out of the box with VirtualBox…they are very up-front about not supporting this use case). I’d love to hear your constructive feedback. I certainly can use the help. Our grandparents built bridges and went to the moon for kicks… …there’s got to be a way to make this work… First method: Identify the issue.