Patient Story: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (Marsha Liss)


It’s been quite an adventure
and I’m glad that I have extremely healthy kids and both of them
have thrived and that’s more than just
helping us live, it’s helping us thrive I’m Marcia Liss.
My sons received their early care at Medstar Georgetown University Hospital. I was at the ultrasound.
I was at 32 weeks and Sam was in distress. Before I knew it, there were attendants
taking my bed from the ultrasound all the way down to the delivery area
and we knew they were going to be C-section cause his twin took up a
breech position very early and he never gave it up
and they were born a minute apart and it was very scary.
His twin who was so much bigger was 3 pounds 12 ounces but Little Sam was only one pound 12 ounces.
He was what they call a micro preemie and he did have surgery.
When you are that little they look at everything and that’s part
of the thoroughness of being in a high-level NICU
and if you need to be there you may not want to need to be there,
but once you’re there they have everything,
and they’re gonna be sure everything’s really good. So it was a very scary time
but it was a time that I was really so grateful to that maternity ward
cocoon support system to the attendants and the
hyper-vigilance of the doctors without being alarmist saying ‘you know –
we’re gonna get through this’ it’s gonna be alright’
and that was good – it pushed me through. So we got to know Dr. Seeva and some of
the other neonatology physicians pretty early, because the first two years
we went back every six months because they were preemies and
especially because Sam was so small they want to follow you up alot more.
And so that also is another thing that gives you a wonderful confidence
that if something’s not going right they’re going to tell us,
they’re going to find out. We won’t be eight years old and
suddenly find out that there’s a problem. The doctors and the nurses at the NICU
were really very, very special. It takes a kinds special dedication to work
in an area with such fragile infants and I think Dr. Seeva exemplifies that
very well. He’s a very bright man.
He really knows exactly how to save babies. He knows how to talk to the parents.
And that’s really quite wonderful. Sam has actually now turned out
to be the athlete from being such a tiny little thing.
He plays baseball. He runs. He’s very good at school. He has this great group of social friends.
Both of them have thrived. Every year Georgetown holds a reunion for
the graduates, as they call them, of the Neonatology Intensive Care Unit. As the boys got older,
I realized that they were doing so well. It was really important to the parents who
had other newborns, other neonates, who were preemies, who had problems, to see my boys doing so well
and to give them that hope. And positive outlook of what can be. As we were preparing
for Joel and Sam’s barmitsva we were looking at their portions
and what was important to them and Sam read the portion that talked
about the midwives that saved the Jewish baby boys including Moses
and the whole rest of the Bible story and he likened it to a phrase that says that,
if you save a life, it is as if you save the whole world,
and he says – when they saved these baby boys
just like when the neonatologists and the NICU saved me. I’m not sure where we would be today if the
boys hadn’t been born there. If they hadn’t been born at a place
that had that special intensive care. But, they have certainly done
the way they have, because they had that great early start.

Florida Car Crash: Hip Fracture & Aseptic Necrosis

Florida Car Crash: Hip Fracture & Aseptic Necrosis


Hi! I’m Dave Glatthorn, I’m an
attorney in West Palm Beach exclusively representing injured
people. I want to tell you a story of a case I had a few
years ago, involving a very unusual injury – and diagnosis
actually – to a gentleman. This gentleman had been in a car
crash, and from the time of the crash – which was a big impact –
he had made complaints not only to his neck and back, but also
to his hip. Well, his history was that about two years before
this accident, he had fallen off a ladder while he was putting up
a basketball net. And the doctor that treated him was very
concerned, because when you break a large bone like that –
what can happen is – the blood vessel inside the bone can get
disrupted and the bone can actually die. You might have
heard the story of Bo Jackson. He had what’s called aseptic
necrosis, where his bone in his hip was actually dying. Well,
the doctor that treated him was very concerned about this and
was, made sure he did not develop this aseptic necrosis.
Now two years later – fast forward to two years later – he
gets into a car accident, has complaints about pain in the
hip. The doctors take x-rays, they don’t see anything. But,
what happens is aseptic necrosis takes at least a year to develop
– so, that you can see on MRIs. And about a year afterwards,
after his constant complaints, they did an MRI that actually
showed the aseptic necrosis. But what was fascinating was is that
the insurance doctor that was hired to examine this gentleman
looked at the MRIs but did not recognize the aseptic necrosis.
So, it was no where in his report, and when I got him on
the stand at trial, he had to admit that, “No, I didn’t even
see that when I examined it.” So, that gives you an example
– really – of how much effort these people put into trying
to give a fair evaluation. If you’ve been involved in an
automobile accident in Florida, the insurance companies will not
hesitate to go out and get the testimony they need to try and
defeat your claim. You’re going to have questions, you’re going
to have some concerns, and you’re going to need help.
Call me, we can answer your questions, we can help you,
we can address your concerns. 561-659-1999. I’m Dave
Glatthorn, thanks for watching!

UofL grad flies hurricane relief to Bahamas

UofL grad flies hurricane relief to Bahamas


My name is Eric Schreiner, graduated in 2017. I’m from Shelbyville, Kentucky. My grandpa, he worked for Cesna and Boeing,
which are two, you know, huge companies in aviation. So, I always kind of had an interest when
I was younger. Um, but I took my first commercial flight
when I was 16-years old. I was walking through the airport and I was
looking at the pilots and their cool uniforms and i looked in the cockpit and it was like,
man, ‘these guys get to fly around the world for a living.’ I talked to my parents and was like, hey,
ya know, I want to take a flight lesson. And I took that first flight lesson and I
fell in love with it. (Sounds of hurricane alarm) I was the hurricane was going to hit. They were talking about how terrible it was going to be. My boss calls and says, ‘hey, you know, we’re
taking some supplies down there.’ So he was like, do you want to go with me. Of course, you know, just getting to help
out is awesome. So, we loaded the plane full, you know normally
where the passengers sit, uh in the cabin, we just filled it with um paper towels, food,
water, diapers, anything that they could have needed. To actually see it first hand it just makes
it that more real. It was a very humbling experience. You see homes just flattened. Businesses, you know, flattened. We landed. The airport was just destroyed. The control tower, you know, normally was
just standing 200 feet in the air just in shambles on the ground. That day was felt, you know, felt different,
it was special. Knowing that what I was doing, the supplies
I was taking are going to help positively impact someone’s life after such a terrible
tragedy. So, yea, I had the best feeling even for,
even now, I still feel happy about it knowing that I’m helping people out there who need
it.

Young Hero: St John Ambulance Everyday Hero Awards

Young Hero: St John Ambulance Everyday Hero Awards


Grandad: It’s a bit of a blur. I got
up and saw my granddaughter off to uni and then went back upstairs, woke up
Logan, came down the stairs and – pow. That was it. Logan: I didn’t know he was having
a heart attack at the time. He wasn’t like himself so I knew something was definitely up. I’d done a lot of the training and it was kind of like these
situations, so I knew what I was doing, so I could relax and do what I can do. And
after I calmed nanny down it got a lot easier. Grandad: Logan’s my grandson. He’s been living with us for the last [together] 10 and a half years [laughs] He came to live with us when he lost his mum and dad couldn’t cope so we’ve been
together, we’ve grown together. Logan: I straightaway noticed that he was all
sweaty and hot and bothered, and he just wasn’t responding very well. I
loosened his collar at his neck so he could get more air, and I put him into a comfortable position. Luckily, the week before we had done the
W position, and the recovery position – all the positions that you needed. Once my Nana got on the phone and told them everything and then she passed the phone over to me
so I could answer some of the questions whilst she went round to next
door because luckily she’s a nurse. And then the ambulance turned up and it was
off to hospital. I was only on my own for like, 15 minutes?
Grandad: It was still a long time! Long long time.
Logan: I know. Grandad: When I came round and Brenda said to me, ‘Logan’s done this and done that,’ you know it was amazing, and I went, ‘Well he’s only just really begun to learn what to do,
and not to panic and to do what he’s supposed to do,’ – it was incredible really. It was my first time performing first aid other than training. I definitely recommend going through St John Ambulance to learn first aid because they’ve
helped me understand a lot and helped me get better. To know it was my granddad, I felt
more relaxed because I knew him. Grandad: We always were strong. Our relationship’s been really pretty good you know from when he was little and up to now. Logan: my Grandad means the world to me. Grandad: I think Logan saved my life. 100%.

How we packed for the walk to Santiago!

How we packed for the walk to Santiago!


We just stopped here at this beautiful bridge, the bridge of Zameiro This bridge dates back to 1185. I’m just reading off over here and this bridge is included in the testament of D. Fernando Martins, who at the time was the bishop of Porto city. The bridge’s construction was pushed forward by a Donation that was made by King D. Afonso Henriques. Really?! The King D. Afonso Henriques was the first King of Portugal… How is that?! An?! This is beautiful history! … That beaten up his mom… hard… on a fight! [Music] Cut! Cut! Cut! Cut! Cut! Truth be told… ladies and gentleman… we just finished the walk to Santiago de Compostela! That little intro over there was day 2… We will get back to that bridge later and we’ll cross that bridge when we get to it. Preparations! So… what did we pack Rosa? How was your pack? Clean surface to lay everything out. Poncho with rain cover for bag. 2 pairs of long pants. Don’t need that! Sleeping pants fleece hoody Slip slops 1 long sleeve shirt 3 T-shirts in bag No umbrella! Smaller?! Might be better… Underwear, socks x 3 Ok…no! Microfiber towel Water flasks Basic first aid kit vaseline voltaren bandanas hats… for sun protection shades with some sun block Too much weight, get rid of it! Personal hygiene with tissues thermal blankets (didn’t actually use that…) bog roll (white gold!) camera bag … with camera, of course soap, plastic bag for whatever zip lock bags another shirt cellphone with charger Can’t forget Frankie! Moon bag the main bag with sleeping bags shoes guide book the pilgrim shell walking sticks the pass with a book and pen monopod Thumbs up! I could just sing a song! la la la la la Quick question! How did you prepare for the Camino to Santiago? Reading a lot of blogs on the Internet, checking a lot of videos from a book, my dad got from someone at the church about the Camino Portugués the Portuguese way I got a lot of my knowledge from Rosa’s research because I am too lazy to research… Physical preparations… First, we found the shoes we wanted to take… was not easy… We decided about taking trecking shoes Those shoes… in the store, they say you can walk with them 40km… in a day yeah, It was a pretty good choice. I am quite happy with the choice. We started doing walks the longest practice walk that we did was… 10 something… 10 or 11 No, there was that one day we walked to bioria… was about 12km 13km actually… was quite a good walk! Was 13km, That was a good practice We walked the shoes, I think 70km Our first day of the Camino was 25km Yeah, the first day was one of the hardest There was another day where we walked 26 or 27 At the end of the day, you feel it The second day we didn’t walk so much. The best item in your bag, if you had to let people know?! What was your favourite item in your bag? The vaseline to protect the feet from getting blisters For me, was my monopod. Served many purposes. What was your big motivator every day? I think, enjoy the Camino, enjoy the experience, enjoy meeting other people experiencing all of it and succeeding another day! My first motivator was obviously Rosa Rosa had to wake me up every morning and get me out of bed My second motivator… what I am going to see today on the road My third motivator was… when am I going to get that beer I went up a mountain with a beer, had a beer on top and down the mountain with a third beer, oh yeah! and celebrated with a beer when we got to the Albergue a couple of beers actually Thank you for watching! Follow the links below to see full packing list Don’t forget to subscribe, hit the notification button And stay tuned for our next video! Day 1! Walk from Porto to Vairão!

Long Island drug dealer indicted in two overdose deaths in Queens

Long Island drug dealer indicted in two overdose deaths in Queens


A Long Island drug dealer was indicted Thursday in the deaths of two customers in Queens — the first time a dope peddler has ever been held responsible for deadly overdoses in the borough, officials said  Justin Lum was formally charged with manslaughter and criminal sale of a controlled substance for allegedly distributing cocaine, Xanax and heroin to his girlfriend and another man, who both overdosed and died Advertisement  According to prosecutors, Lum, 30, supplied heroin to his girlfriend, Patricia Collado, 28, at a movie theater in College Point, Queens on April 27, 2017 The two watched a film and allegedly got high snorting lines of heroin from a cell phone  After the movie, Lum and Collado left the area and again used heroin supplied by Lum inside a parked car, when the victim suddenly stopped talking and passed out, prosecutors said  First responders administered Naloxone to the woman and transported her to a hospital nearby After she was discharged later that night, the couple went to Lum’s grandfather’s home in Flushing, where they snorted more heroin that Lum had supplied, according to court papers  Collado soon went into cardiac arrest and was foaming at the mouth. Lum did not call 911, telling authorities he “didn’t want to call the amublance again ”  Lum finally called an ambulance the next morning when his girlfriend would not wake up An autopsy report revealed that the heroin Collado consumed was laced with fentanyl  Nearly a year later, Lum supplied heroin to Calvin Brown, who survived a near-fatal overdose in Lum’s home after the drug dealer called 911 and administered CPR, prosecutors said  Days later, Brown got more heroin from Lum, and died from an overdose in his mother’s Queens home An autospy determined that Brown had consumed Xanax and several other narcotics with the heroin  Lum later told another customer he thought he was in the clear because he had tried to save the victims, according to prosecutors  “This defendant thought he was safe from prosecution. He was dead wrong,” said Acting Queens District Attorney John Ryan Lum’s attorney said the dope dealer was receiving treatment for his severe drug addiction  “It is always a tragedy when those afflicted with addiction succumb to their diseases But Justin has a long history of drug addiction and so I ask that if your honor does set bail, let it be known he has a medical condition and is receiving treatment,” said attorney Scott Carrigan  Lum was ordered held without bail until his next court date. If convicted, he faces between 26 and 126 years in prison

Stem Cell Treatment for Spinal Cord Injury | Stem Cell Treatment Testimonial

Stem Cell Treatment for Spinal Cord Injury | Stem Cell Treatment Testimonial


Before the accident, my condition was normal. I was healthy. Then I could not do anything because I couldn’t move. You know, every patient would like to get better. Six years ago, in 2011, I had a car accident, because of which I was in a very serious situation, a serious spinal injury, I was in a wheelchair. From the waist to the knees I could feel something,
but from the knees down, nothing. But in time, sense began to return. And slowly, with exercises, I began to stand up. Even the doctors were surprised by this because I was in a serious condition and they could not believe I could stand up. But that was it! In all these years, not entirely but almost halfway, I recovered. Doing a lot of rehabilitation. I have never had stem cell treatment before, during these past six years and I read that the stem cells can help nerves and all the treatment done here, I heard about the stem cells from another Romanian patient who came here and who got better,
so I decided to come here to get it, even if the treatment cannot guarantee
to anyone that you will recover 100%. When I arrived at the hospital, I had a very good impression because they
welcomed me very nicely, in a very warm way. What can I say? Extraordinary people who worked very well with me. They are very patient. This matters a lot for a patient: when the person next to you, the therapist, is patient and explains things well. Although I cannot speak English, we got along very well with each other. The treatment that I got was exactly how it was described beforehand by the representative. I was very scared but… it was ok. It was good. There are many new things in physiotherapy, different from what I did in Romania. The TMS: I did not know what it meant before and now I consider it a very good thing. I thought it would be different, but it was fine. The same with the oxygen therapy.
At the beginning, there was a little pressure. I was a little afraid, especially the first time they put me in the room, After that, I got used to it and I felt good, even marvellous. And also the acupuncture. It impressed me very much because I haven’t
done it before, and you know, the needles! One gets scared when you see them but it is not like this! And I understand that acupuncture really helps the muscles and the nerves. I recommend the stem cell treatment. It does not harm you! On the contrary, it helps you. What is important is what will come next. Like the doctor told me, from three to six months, but I will wait. It is not like today you receive the stem cells
and tomorrow you see the progress. I know this. I will wait and I hope that the stem cell treatment together with all the treatment I’ve done here, will help me become the person I was before.

What YOU Need to Know about Sepsis

What YOU Need to Know about Sepsis


You know, I live with two words: “If only,” every day. And they play a big role in my life because if only I had been more educated. If only I knew about sepsis, maybe my son would be alive today. In spite of having sepsis, and he had it at such a young age, my son is just as normal as any other kid. He’s riding his bike, or learning how to ride a bike, with training wheels, he■s playing basketball, he wants to get into T-ball — so those things that normal 4-year-old kids do, he can now do. Josh was very fit, he was healthy. He had done over 1000 jumps skydiving and he had become an instructor, so he was very healthy. On Labor Day Weekend of 2006, Josh was on his last jump. and there was a cold air density problem that pushed his chute inward and threw him to the ground at 60 miles an hour. Joshua jackknifed. He broke his left femur and his helmet produced a contusion on the back of his head. He was immediately taken to the emergency department and upon arrival his brain started to swell. Josh acquired not one, but two cases of MRSA, he battled and won those, and then he acquired what they call delirium or ICU psychosis. But he — he won it. He — he was — he was strong and he fought all of it. And then finally the doctors came to us one day after six weeks in ICU and they said, “Mom and Dad, it’s time to go home. Josh is doing well” Six days into rehab, we received what we called the phone call from hell, 11:30 at night from his neurosurgeon, saying that at rehab Josh spiked a fever of 103 and he coded. Steven is a special little boy, a really special kid. And I know every parent thinks that their child is “the most special” but Steven is really special because he had a liver transplant when he was two-months-old. One of things we learn as transplant parents is that we are kind of frequent flyers, if you will, for hospital visits. And it’s not a frequent flyer club you want to be a part of, but it’s also a club that makes you very aware of things. It’s just he and I, just the boys. We’re at home and things are going great. At first he was lethargic, he slept a lot, a lot more than he normally would sleep during the day. The other thing is that he was shivering and he had a fever, and then the fact that he was just throwing up and he was restless all through the night — those are the things that kind of tipped me off that that something was really, really awry and let me know that this might be sepsis. As a member of the Armed Forces we have this thing we say, “When you see something, say something.” It goes beyond just homeland security and national defense, it applies to your health care, “When you see something, say something.” Josh died of sepsis. My son survived sepsis, and I think because I took him in when I did, it was the biggest factor in him surviving Go to the emergency department. It’s the only place that they’re equipped to handle sepsis. We have documented cases now where a patient will come in through the emergency department and not say much except, “I feel feverish.” “Could be the flu.” And so the patient sits there and you know how busy emergency departments are. That person is not really dying at that moment that they walked in, and so it’s not a priority. They don’t have a gun shot. So 3, 4 hours go by and that’s how fast sepsis works That 3, 4 hours gone by, by the time that person gets seen, they’re now passing out and they’re now in septic shock, and they’re now dying. Learn the symptoms. Learn about sepsis today. Shivering, fever or very cold. Extreme pain or general discomfort. Pale or discolored skin. Sleepy, difficult to rouse, confused. “I feel like I might die.” Short of breath. Even if you think you have the flu, if you have an infection, if you’re running a fever, you have any of the symptoms, say the words, “I suspect sepsis.” “I think this might be sepsis.” If the person suggests that it might be sepsis, that means they need to be seen right away. Sepsis is extremely treatable, but you have to catch it early. Call 911 immediately. Do not waste one single minute. And when you get there, say the words: “I suspect sepsis.”

How I Finally Got Relief for My Headaches!

How I Finally Got Relief for My Headaches!


My headaches started when I was in the
5th grade. I was only 10 years old. They started affecting me when I wasn’t
able to look at the blackboard anymore. I wasn’t able to focus on what the teacher
was saying, so I wasn’t paying attention and my grades were going down. Before my headaches started, my childhood was great. I was an average kid playing outside.
When my headaches started I was very scared. Very frustrated… because I thought I had to live with this my whole life. My biggest fear was that I wouldn’t have a
normal life. Little by little, my headaches started interfering with my
life. All of my relationships were affected. Everybody was outside, all the
kids from the block, and I was inside. I was no longer playing with anybody. I was isolating myself. I was getting daily headaches and I was taking painkillers
for it daily just to get by. They were temporary relief, but my headaches were
still there and I didn’t know what else to do. I first heard of Intouch
Chiropractic and Dr. Young through a job post on Craigslist to which I applied.
Little did I know it was gonna change my life around. My first impression of the
office was super high energy, super friendly and welcoming. When I first
started, I was very skeptical. I had never been to
a chiropractic office in the past and honestly I didn’t know what NUCCA was. What surprised me the most about NUCCA was the adjustment itself. There’s no popping, no twisting, no cracking. The adjustment itself is very
non-invasive. Actually I didn’t feel anything. Now I feel great. I’m a new
person. I smile. I’m outgoing. I have my life back. Looking back I suffered with my
headaches for more than 10 years and it was a daily ongoing thing. Everything has
changed since I started chiropractic care. NUCCA has helped me be myself again. I now go out with my friends. I can now have a conversation. I don’t feel tired. I am no
longer taking painkillers. My life has turned around completely. I’m looking
forward to the future being a better me. I’m no longer skeptical. I now know what chiropractic is and I have learned that NUCCA has been able to help me in so many ways. I think it’s hard for people to wrap their head
around the fact that NUCCA can help with headaches and other symptoms not related to neck pain or back pain. I totally recommend Dr. Young and Intouch
Chiropractic. I wish somebody could have told my parents or me that there was
something out there that could help with my headaches, so I wouldn’t have to
suffer every single day. My name is Joselyn. I’m an outgoing person. I love
animals, fashion and anything beauty related. I’m the office manager at Intouch Chiropractic and I’m a proud patient of Dr. Young’s. San Diego NUCCA Upper Cervical Care Experts

Client Success Story #1 – Personal Injury


Once I did my research, hands down, there was no reason for me to call anybody else. First impression is a lasting impression, and as soon as he came into the office He was professional Comforting and very approachable. I was able to ask him any questions He was able to answer them. With no questions asked, I knew he was a lawyer I needed to choose His team was always dedicated to my case Never had to worry about not understanding how the process goes, this is the first time for me that this unfortunate situation happened, so Having his team, if he wasn’t in the office I could call Janira, if Janira wasn’t available, even down to the secretary was able to comfort me Help me through the process and made sure somebody called me back that day and explained exactly what I needed to do Absolutely, I’ve already recommended another friend of mine who unfortunately was hit by a car By a drunk driver no less and I told her she doesn’t need to look anywhere call this number And they’ll take care of her and she’s very happy with the process TonaLaw was “Team Colello”. And every client that he has I’m sure feels like they are team that person so From my settlement to moving through the process. He didn’t push me to have a quick settlement He encouraged me to get the best settlement possible