North West Air Ambulance Patient Story – The Boy Of Steel

North West Air Ambulance Patient Story – The Boy Of Steel


(Music starts) (Corinne Mason) It was on a Sunday evening
that we joined the M6 and as we were on the M6 my husband and myself could see and smell
diesel. Just as we’d noticed it, the lady in front of us, hit the diesel in her car,
spun and crashed into the crash barrier. Because we could see diesel in front of
us, we decided to pull over to the hard shoulder and get the children
out to safety. (Richard Mason) Well I got out of the car,
to walk down the hard shoulder to make sure the other driver was okay and as my family
were getting out the car, another two cars skid on the diesel and smashed into the car. (Noise of car skidding, crashing and
smashing into the car) Unfortunately, my son was getting out of the
car at the time, so I saw the car hit ours and then our car get pushed into the verge.
And my son go flying into the air and landing on the hard shoulder. (Music fades out) (New music starts) When I first got to him, he was broken on
the floor. He was unconscious. I didn’t know his breathing so I essentially
thought he was dead. (Corinne Mason) There was hundreds, if not
thousands of cars stopped still and I was just screaming and shouting, just thinking
we’d lost him. He was dead. As far as we were concerned he was unconscious, his head was
caved from the very top and all within five seconds. That split decision to try and get
him to safety, all went wrong. The land ambulance were the first people to
arrive. They were great. They got Fred into the ambulance and made an assessment. Well
almost instantly they decided that they needed the Northwest Air Ambulance. When the Air
Ambulance arrived, it was like a lifeline. It was like somebody had come to help us.
They were like heroes arriving. (Richard Mason) When he got to taken to the
helicopter, I was very distressed because he was obviously seriously injured but when
we saw the helicopter, we knew that he was going to get to where he needs to be quickly. (Corinne Mason) By Air Ambulance, it took
them fifteen minutes to get him to Liverpool Alder Hay Children’s Hospital but by car,
by land ambulance that would have taken an hour and a half. You know he could have bled
out. Anything could have happened but they got him there quickly and safely. (Music fades out) (New music starts) Fred had a decompressed skull after the accident,
which meant that his skull was pushed in, at the top corner. Fred was in Alder Hay for
only a week but he got the nickname, the boy of steel because they couldn’t believe that
this little boy that had been brought in under these circumstances had made such a miraculous
recovery. There was no long-term damage and we managed to get him home a week later. After
the surgery it was just a case of looking after him and making sure that he was
okay – physically, mentally and emotionally. We’re extremely thankful to the Northwest
Air Ambulance and we’ll never stop saying thank you. The Northwest Air Ambulance changed
the outcome for us. We don’t know what would have happened but what I do know is that time, the quickness of the journey changed
Fred’s outcome. (Richard Mason) The Northwest Air Ambulance
– we didn’t think about it one bit until we really needed it and I suppose that’s the
point of it. You don’t know until you need it. So they need all the money they can get,
to make sure that they’re there when you need them. I think we’d do the same again. We’d pull
over, but it does make you aware of how dangerous the motorway can be and how quickly things
can change, because we went from (Richard starts to get upset) We went from just a normal Sunday afternoon
out, to what could be only described as the worst day of your life. So yeah, things can
change very quickly. Fred was a very lucky boy. On that day, The Northwest Air Ambulance
made a massive difference. He couldn’t have got to where he needed to be as quickly. He
couldn’t have got the care he needed that quickly. Even he realizes how lucky he is.
He is bouncy. He is bubbly. So thank you very much. (Corinne Mason) It’s really important that
people contribute to the Northwest Air Ambulance if they can. It’s a charity, so it needs people’s
support. (Richard Mason) We didn’t realise it until
after the accident that it was a charity. They need a lot of money, to help a lot of
people. There’s no other charity service that provides this type of quick response, high-value
care. Very well trained individuals. You know, at the flick of a switch they can be there. (Richard and Corinne’s children) Thank you
North West Air Ambulance because if it wasn’t you I wouldn’t be sat here with my brother
now. Thank you. (Music fades out)

First Aid Saves Lives

First Aid Saves Lives


– My name is Beverly Bruce, and I’m a Project Coordinator
for the Digital Systems Group. I came into work; it was a typical day. And about 11:30 a.m. I felt really hungry, and so I went into the kitchen and took the leftovers out of the fridge. It was a sandwich. I remember stopping for a moment to look down Burrard Street, and I was admiring the view. And I thought, “Oh I have
to get back to work.” And I make my way to the hallway, walking. And so when I got to the door, I need to swipe my access
card to get through. So I shoved the rest of
the sandwich in my mouth. I tried to swallow. I thought I was swallowing
some of the food. And I clearly swallowed it
all, and it blocked my airway. And I felt pain immediately. – I went out into the passageway, and down the passage to
see what was going on. And there I saw Bev on
her knees crouched over. And it became obvious to
me that she was choking. – There were a number
of people standing up. There were a number of people sort of slightly frozen in place. There were a few folks that
were yelling to call 9-1-1. And somebody was yelling, “Does
anybody know the Heimlich?” – Without a second thought I said, “I better do something about this.” I learned about the Heimlich
maneuver in first aid training, but I wasn’t very effective. Had all the right moves, but
I wasn’t able to dislodge what was in Bev’s mouth, and
she was continuing to choke. – Time was ticking, and
I’m starting to groan now, and I’m starting to panic. And the realization of what is happening is starting to click with me. – As I was walking towards her, Warren actually ran by me and
grabbed Beverly off the floor, and started doing the Heimlich maneuver. – My name’s Warren Yau, and
I’m General Manager, Projects, attached to Base Metals Group. I started the Heimlich. It was not like you see on the film. You’re supposed to give it one thrust, and whatever’s stuck in the
passage is supposed to pop out. It didn’t happen that way. – At one point a small piece of what was lodged in her throat came out, and everybody stopped. And she looked at me, and it was clear that it wasn’t all out, and she was still unable to breathe. So I think in my best mom voice, I told everybody they couldn’t stop, and they needed to keep going. I figured my best place was
to go into Beverly’s face so she could see a friendly face, and try to encourage her to help Warren help get whatever was
lodged in her throat out. – Well at first I wasn’t
really sure what was happening. I remember her rubbing my
back, and consoling me, and talking to me. But eventually, I clued in, and I thought… Don’t know where this is coming from. “I’m gonna die at work.” And ya, it was surreal. I thought, “I’m choking,
and I can’t breathe.” – So she was looking at
me like, “This is it.” So I screamed at Warren,
who is working very hard, to try a few more times. – So I just kept going until, and I don’t know how long it took, maybe two minutes, three minutes. – And then the whole piece of
what was lodged in her throat came out, and she collapsed to the floor. – Ya, they picked me up
and placed me in my chair, and sat me down. And then the first aid attendant came, and the ambulance eventually came. And I was taken to the emergency room at St. Paul’s Hospital. I just want to convey my
gratitude to Warren Yau. We had a great relationship
before this happened, and I really do consider
my coworkers family. – I think it made our
group a little tighter, and a little stronger. I think we all appreciate that we’re a family here at work, and at Teck we take care of each other. So I think there was a reflection on how seriously we all take it. And so that was a very good positive. – It’s not just the physical
part of intervention, but there is, I think, comfort
that needs to be provided, and being a friend. Seeing if there’s anything you can do to support emotionally. – After the event, I realized
that I should redo and update my first aid training. So I was very pleased
when the company arranged for first aid training for all of PDG. – I think one of the things
that this incident has shown us, with an incident of this nature, is that even with the
established protocols, it can be very difficult to
achieve the wanted outcome in clearing that airway. Following this incident, we searched for a new level of control to help with choking related events. And, we found LifeVac. LifeVac is a very simple suction device designed to help clear
an airway obstruction in combination with the
standard choking protocols. – I think a tool like LifeVac would actually help people
feel more comfortable in responding, and getting in there and really truly helping. – Even one life saved
with a tool like this is a great outcome. And if anyone amongst the Teck family ever finds themselves in need, we want this tool to be
at hand, at the ready, to help support someone. – Even after you have the training, I think you have to be in a mindset where if you see a situation,
you just have to do it. And don’t hesitate. It may be a little bit of difference that could change the outcomes. At the end of the day, what’s more important is that
someone steps up and acts. – The safety culture here is top notch, but I’m so proud of Teck for doing that. Little ‘ol me. And taking this opportunity to do that. I wanna say thank you to Teck. I wanna say thank you to Loz, and the whole Health and Safety
Department, and you guys. It makes a big difference. (upbeat music)

The relief of the 28th Infantry Division | Hell in the Hürtgen Forest | Part V

The relief of the 28th Infantry Division | Hell in the Hürtgen Forest | Part V


Previously on Hell in the Hürtgen forest
we saw how a queer action led to loss of half of Vossenack and we also saw how Kommerscheidt
became more and more of a mess filled with various different units. Although the Americans managed to keep the
Germans out of Kommerscheidt, the mental state of the GI’s was rapidly decreasing. The veterans had either been killed or wounded
and many green recruits had taken their place. In this final episode of the series we will
take a look at the endgame of the 28th Infantry Division In The Hürtgen Forest. As light started to grow on the 7th of November
1944 the Germans started to bombard the defences at Kommerscheidt. Next to the shells was the cold, almost icy
rain. After several days of failed attempts to take
the town, the Germans were determined more than ever to finally break the Kommerscheidt
defences. Finally, after the 30 minute long bombardment
the Germans attacked. Just under 20 Panzers of the 16th Panzer Regiment
advanced together with the infantry of the 89th Infantry Division. The Panzers inflicted heavy losses, especially
to the left flank of A company, 112th Infantry Regiment. The company’s command post was fired at
multiple times and A company’s commander, Captain Frear was among the wounded. On the American right flank, the Panzers managed
to move in on the foxholes of company B, 112th Infantry regiment. But, thanks to personal initiatives the Panzers
were forced to back up. The heavy weapons of M company also suffered
terrible losses, but its commander Captain Hackard managed to avenge the loss of multiple
of his mortars and heavy machine guns by knocking out one of the Panzers with a bazooka. The American tanks got stuck into the fight
as well. Lieutenant Payne, a platoon commander in A
company 707th Tank battalion managed to knock out a German tank which tried to flank the
right side of the village. Payne was aided by two tank destroyers before
they finally managed to bring the panzer to a crashing halt. In the centre of the Hamlet, Lieutenant Edmund
in his M10 managed to knock out a Panther at point blank range and another M10 also
destroyed another German tank. In return 3 M10’s were also quickly put
out of action, including Lieutenant Edmund’s. As the German tanks entered the village, Colonel
Ripple and Colonel Peterson were just in time to leave their command post as one of the
panzers was starting to blaze away at it. Major Hazlett jumped from post to post to
encourage his men to fight on, but despite his best of efforts, many were already leaving
their foxholes. Captain Rumbaugh, in command of the 3rd battalion
110th Infantry Regiment at the wood line was ordered up to aid in the defence but before
Rumbaugh could assemble his men his orders changed as Colonel Peterson arrived at the
wood line. C company of the 112th Infantry Regiment was
committed instead. Just as Peterson had given his orders to C
company, a message arrived stating that he was expected at the divisional headquarters. Peterson at once left in a jeep. Finally he was given the opportunity to clarify
the true situation at Kommerscheidt to his superiors. Colonel Ripple thus took over the command
at Kommerscheidt. C company was ordered forward but the company
didn’t move out of their foxholes, even Ripple’s presence was unable to convince
the men of C company to move into Kommerscheidt. As more and more Panzers entered Komemmerscheidt,
more GI’s started to withdraw. A few tanks were sent up to stem the tide,
but it was all in vain, two more Sherman tanks as well as a Tank Destroyer were destroyed
in quick succession. The remaining American tanks started to drive
back. Eventually only one Sherman and two M10’s
remained on the battlefield and with the armour pulling back, Major Christensen of 3rd battalion
also ordered his men to withdraw. Gradually more men withdrew including a party
of 75 men of A company. Everything was done to establish a new defensive
line at the edge of the woods overlooking the hamlet. Kommerscheidt was lost to the Germans at 11h25am. Chaos reigned on the battlefield. Units were reorganized while the wounded men
poured down into the Kall valley towards the aid station. At the edge of the woods were the 3rd battalion,
110th infantry regiment, C company of the 112th Infantry Regiment and some 200 survivors
of the fighting at Kommerscheidt. In order to prevent a blue on blue incident,
the Americans hardly fired an artillery round at Kommerscheidt which was still full of wounded
GI’s. None the less, the approaches from Schmidt
were continuously fired on. Just like the attack at Schmidt a few days
before, the Germans didn’t press home the attack. This gave the Americans valuable time to reorganize
and improve the new defences. At about 18h30pm, the Germans renewed their
attacks. A handful of Panzers tried to get across the
open, but the artillery fire knocked out the leading Panzer and the others subsequently
withdrew. The situation was somewhat restored but the
28th infantry Division was facing a very stressful night. During the day, Colonel Peterson had been
ordered up to the divisional headquarters. He was to be relieved by Colonel Gustin Nelson. Peterson meanwhile had been forced to abandon
his jeep after being fired upon by a German squad along the Kall trail. After a trying trek across the Kall gorge,
dodging various German parties, the WW1 veteran was eventually hit by a piece of shrapnel. One of the men with Colonel Peterson, Private
Seiler was killed in the attempt to cross the woods. After spending the last stretch along the
river bank crawling, the colonel had lost his energy and instead gambled on crying out
his name until he was eventually picked up by two GI’s who applied morphine and brought
the exhausted and wounded Peterson to the rear. As Colonel Peterson and the Engineers along
the Kall trail found out the hard way, the Germans had managed to reach the trail and
it became more and more difficult to move supplies or reinforcements up to or from Kommerscheidt. While the Germans were attacking Kommerscheidt
in force, the Americans were making plans to recapture their lost positions in front
of Vossenack. At 08h00am, the 146th Engineers who were going
to perform the attack postponed it for about 15 minutes. As the American artillery lifted, the Germans
immediately laid down a counter-barrage. 1st Lieutenant Meier’s 2nd platoon, of C
company was ordered to recapture the houses on the left of the main street. His platoon took multiple casualties in the
attempt to move up. A company under Captain Ball at the same time
rushed ahead in order to capture the damaged church. A firefight ensued in the church which resulted
in several Germans being killed and the capture of some 16 others. The men of A company also overcame a machinegun
position in the cemetery. From the cemetery position they were able
to support 1st Lieutenant Meier’s advance on the left. At the same time the supporting tanks of 2nd
Lieutenant Johnson, 2nd platoon B company of the 707th Tank battalion also moved up
to support the infantry. Although the tanks weren’t of much use in
the close-quarters combat they did provide moral support. The men of Meier proceeded, house by house
capturing 19 Germans in one single building. Later during the fight, the air force was
called up and although most planes successfully bombed their targets, two of the P47’s mistakenly
bombed the friendly lines. But, in spite of this incident, most of Vossenack
had been recaptured by the evening. At noon the 109th Infantry Regiment was finally
relieved by the men of the 12th Infantry Regiment of the 4th Infantry Division. The three battalions of the 109th weren’t
finished with the Hurtgen Forest though. After dark, the second battalion relieved
the 146th Engineers in Vossenack. Of the 109th Infantry Regiment, only the 1st
battalion had received reinforcements, some 200 men in total. The 3rd battalion on its turn was to be a
part of Task Force Davis which was ordered to recapture Schmidt. The taskforce further consisted of the 112th
Infantry regiment, minus it’s 2nd battalion, companies A and C of the 707th Tank battalion
and companies B and C of the 893rd Tank Destroyer Battalion. All forces were desperately understrength
and the tanks had received a blow during the fighting for kommerscheidt. Besides, the Tank Destroyers of the taskforce
still had to cross the Kall trail which was infested with Germans. None the less General Davis in command of
the taskforce ordered the tank destroyers under his command to immediately cross the
trail. While the M10’s were moving up, the 3rd
battalion of the 109th proceeded to the Kall bridge. Or at least that’s what they thought they
were doing. In theory, the 3rd battalion had lost its
way and they eventually ended up behind the 110th Infantry Regiment to the southwest. In order to conform with the general’s wishes,
4 M10’s of B company’s 2nd platoon were ordered to make a dash for the Kall trail. As the four Tank destroyers broke the cover
of Vossenack at about 15h00pm, they were met by a hail of fire coming from across the valley. Two M10’s received a direct hit and were
knocked out while another was hit in the drive sprocket and veered-off. The fourth and last tank destroyer made it
to the wood line, but they went too fast and slid off the path, plunging into the valley
below. Although badly shaken, the crew made it out
alive. During the day General Cota, in command of
the 28th infantry division had a meeting with the V corps and First army commanders in which
he suggested that his troops be withdrawn across the Kall stream. Both the corps and the army commanders agreed. It was the beginning of the end. While the 1055th Infantry Regiment had successfully
captured Kommerscheidt, the men of the 156th and 60th Panzer Grenadier Regiments had to
give up the eastern part of Vossenack to the American Engineers. At the same time however, the Germans were
able to infiltrate the lines along the Kall trail. On the next day, November 8th, the 3rd battalion
of the 109th Infantry Regiment was called out again to proceed to the Kall river from
where they were to act as the basis of the withdrawal across the stream. They eventually arrived at the Kall trail
at 13pm. L Company stayed behind between Simonskall
and the bridge at the Mestrenger Mühle in order to provide flank protection. In the meantime contact was established with
Colonel Nelson and eventually with Colonel Ripple as well. The commanders on the field quickly made plans
for a smooth withdrawal across the Kall stream. At the wood line in front of Kommerscheidt
the day was appearing to be pretty calm until 6 Germans Panzers were spotted around Kommerscheidt,
but thanks to the counter-artillery the German attack never really materialized. The Germans tried again during the afternoon,
but with the help of the M10 Tank Destroyers of Lieutenant Davis across the valley at Vossenack,
all six of the German panzers were reported as knocked out. As Colonel Nelson finally arrived at the wood
line, measures were taken to start the process of the withdrawal. The wounded were being brought back and L
company of the 110th was chosen as the covering force. As darkness fell, the artillery would lay
down a covering barrage to conceal the withdrawal. The withdrawal itself consisted of two parts,
a group with the wounded and a group with the men who were still fit to fight, some
300 fighting men in total. As the men set out, German mortar fire started
to fall near the Kall trail and the men were forced to spread out. As it was dark the reorganization of the group
was nearly impossible. Colonel Nelson with his group made it safely
past the column of wounded GI’s and also managed to cross the Kall bridge to safety. The wounded meanwhile walked on until they
came across the Germans guarding the bridge. After a bit of negotiating all men of the
group were allowed to pass, including the armed soldiers who were carrying some of the
wounded. The withdrawal was a success. Most of the scattered parties managed to make
their way across the stream to the designated assembly area. The group with Colonel Ripple was one of these
scattered parties which eventually reached the 3rd battalion, 109th Infantry Regiment. Only a few soldiers didn’t make it. Others did make it, but went to Vossenack
instead, like Lieutenant Fleig who you might remember from the battles at Kommerscheidt. Over at Hürtgen, the 12th Infantry Regiment
immediately sent out one battalion to eliminate a German salient along the Weisser Weh creek. The battalion was unable to make good progress
and eventually turned back to the initial start line. To the south at Raffelbrand, the 2nd battalion
110th Infantry Regiment made an attempt to attack the German-held pillboxes, but their
attack was repulsed. During the night everything was done to give
the wounded of Kommerscheidt the treatment they needed. But as the aid-stations became crowded, the
walking wounded were simply advised to walk back to the rear and seek medical attention
there. Several parties along the Kall trail were
harassed by the Germans overlooking the only supply route of the Americans. That same day the 112th Infantry Regiment
received some 500 replacements to bring the battalions back to combat strength. The next day, November 9th, the weather went
from bad to worse with snow falling on the 28th infantry Division’s positions. The already difficult task of getting vehicles
through became even more difficult now that snow was falling down. That 9th of November, Major Berndt the surgeon
of the 112th Infantry Regiment asked his superiors if he could set up a truce to bring in the
wounded still left on the battlefield. His suggestion was declined and the response
he got was that he should instead find out what the Germans thought of such a truce. Major Berndt then moved up to the aid station
at the Kall trail to see the situation for himself. Unware that the division had by then authorized
a truce, Berndt and his interpreter went out the bridge on their own to seek the German
commander in the area. Eventually a Leutnant came out to meet them. Berndt was surprised to hear that all the
wounded along the wood line at Kommerscheidt had already been taken away. But, there was still the situation at the
Aid station which was piled with wounded men awaiting evacuation. The German officer agreed that his men would
let the evacuation vehicles past, but he couldn’t vouch for the German artillery. Both Americans and Germans worked together
in order to evacuate the wounded. Later problems arose on the Kall trail closer
to Vossenack when a German Captain was unaware of the truce. The German officer insisted that only the
seriously injured soldiers and the medical personnel could be evacuated. Slowly but surely, the wounded were evacuated
under the close watch of the German Captain and his men. By that time, the German 89th infantry Division
had relieved almost the entirety of the 116th Panzer Division which was shifted to Hürtgen
for a new German attack on the salient held by the 12th Infantry Regiment of the 4th Infantry
Division. On the 10th of November, unaware of the new
German peril at Hürtgen, the Americans attacked to even their lines. The 1st battalion of the 109th had to take
over from the 112th Infantry Regiment since the latter consisted nearly entirely of fresh
recruits. The 109th partially reached their objectives. On the 11th of November a new truce was established,
this time by a German Medical officer who wanted to collect the German dead in the Kall
gorge. The Americans were given time to find a new
route, avoiding the German Captain to the north. Eventually the entire US aid station was evacuated. The next day, the 110th Infantry Regiment
made yet another attempt to capture the Raffelsbrandt pillboxes, but the companies were so worn-down
that the attack never really materialized. All elements of the 112th Infantry Regiment
were finally relieved after the 2nd Ranger battalion was attached to the 109th Infantry
Regiment on the 14th of November. On the 17th of November, with the arrival
of the 8th Infantry Division, the 110th Infantry Regiment was also relieved and moved out of
the Simonskall sector. The relief of the 28th infantry Division was
completed by the 19th of November as the 8th infantry division also took over the positions
of the 109th infantry Regiment. The 28th Infantry Division was finally out
of the front line at Vossenack and Hürtgen. In November of 1944, the 28th infantry Division
had suffered 5 684 casualties and if you add attached units the sad total comes to 6 184. The hardest hit regiment was the 112th which
deplored 2093 casualties, 232 were captured, 431 men were missing, a further 719 were wounded
while 167 men were killed. The regiment also had 544 non-battle casualties. The Germans also endured heavy losses. It is estimated that they had some 2000 casualties
of all types. The Americans also lost 16 of the 20 M10 tank
destroyers and 31 out of the 50 tanks in the endeavour to capture Schmidt. The Hurtgen campaign of the 28th Infantry
Division had come to an end. The soldiers had behaved well under trying
conditions but casualties were incredibly high. The attack to take Schmidt and act as a divergent
for other American attacks had failed. The one-way supply route which was the Kall
trial was a major factor which lead to the eventual defeat. So was the weather and the quick move by the
116th Panzer Division. I hope you enjoyed this series, I most certainly
did making it. I thank you very much for watching and I hope
to see you in a future video! Don’t forget to like and subscribe and do
leave a comment down below! Cheers!

Ade Edmondson’s cervical fracture – Would I Lie to You? [HD][CC]

Ade Edmondson’s cervical fracture – Would I Lie to You? [HD][CC]


“When I broke my neck at school all
I was given was an aspirin.” – David’s team.
– What happened? How did you break
your neck? – Erm… – LAUGHTER – Don’t worry, we can lose that
pause in the edit! – LAUGHTER – As a young man I was in the gym
team. – Right.
– At school. We were doing a display for…
Whatever you do… Founder’s Day, something like that
you know. I had to do a somersault over a box. A box? A horse. – Yeah, yeah, a horse box.
– The bit… – One of the…
– It wasn’t that big.
– No, a vault.
– Yes. So I jumped over one of those and was supposed to do a somersault,
but I did one and a half. – And landed on your head. – He’s very clever, isn’t he, that
one? – So what happened then, Ade? You
came crashing to the floor? – There was a very loud noise. – Your neck breaking made a noise? – Yes. Why wouldn’t a neck breaking
make a lot of noise? – That’s a good point.
– Wouldn’t you scream anyway? – But the noise would precede the
scream. – But on the way down, on the way to
hitting your neck, presumably you’d be shouting out
something like, “Ahhh!” – No because actually there’s
sometimes a delay before the pain
actually arrives. – Yeah, but there still might be
alarm as you see the chances of you
saving yourself from your neck
breaking. It’s like people in an aeroplane
that’s crashing, they’re probably screaming and you
don’t go, “Well, you’re fine at the moment.” – LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE So you’ve hit the ground, you fall
to the floor, what happens then? – I was in a great deal of pain.
– Was there a gym teacher present? – There was. He was Scottish. Jock
Watt, his name was. – LAUGHTER – No, no, no.
– That was his…
– Jock Watt. – You had a teacher called Jock
Watt? So what did Watt do? – One of the first things he did… ..was he put out his cigarette. – LAUGHTER – Erm, no…
– On the head of a nearby child. – LAUGHTER – Watt was there…
– Where? – In the display.
– Watt was in the display? What? Part of it? – We’re quite small schoolboys.
– Cheer leaders. – So there’s a kind of teacher to
catch you.
– Oh, yes. – Or half catch you, half catch…
– What, somebody dropped you? – You bounce over the thing and you
sort of… – Is that after he dropped you? Is
that when he went… – LAUGHTER – I was carried off the field of
display. – By what?
– By… – LAUGHTER – And taken to the sick bay… ..where I was given an aspirin. – So where was Watt now? LAUGHTER – I wish his name wasn’t Watt. – Why? LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE – Oh, dear. – So was it evident to you from the
start that you’d broken your neck? – Er, no. I suffered a great deal of pain for
very many years… ..and didn’t really find out about
the… ..crushed vertebrae… ..until… – Yesterday. – Until a few years after. – So what are you thinking? Are you
thinking that it could be true? – Well, the thing is, I have been
observing him, as I do, and he doesn’t have full movement of
his neck. Look, look at that. – Wow! How long have you been observing him
for, Claude? – Yeah, you see. – What do you think?
– I reckon it’s true now because of the whole neck thing.
– You think it’s true because of inhibited neck movement.
– I do, indeed. – We’re going to say it’s true. – Ade Edmondson, was it true or was
it a lie? – It’s… ..true.
– Yeah! – Yes, it’s true, Ade was given an
aspirin for a broken neck.

For a Compression Fracture, Kyphoplasty Offers Pain Relief


I had decided to get back in shape. When Lisa Peniston committed to getting healthy,
she didn’t expect to get hurt. And as I came back down, I think my knee buckled
and immediately I just started yelling, “My back, my back.” I could feel it hurt. Her doctor told her the fall caused a compression
fracture in a vertebra in her back. The type of injury made her a candidate for
a procedure called kyphoplasty. They would put me under and basically put
a cement in it to build it back up to the correct size so it would take the pressure
off. And then I’d be fine and able to walk. Kyphoplasty is a procedure where we stick
trocar needles into the vertebral bodies from the back of the spine. We create a cavity with a balloon, and that
cavity is then filled with a thick bone cement. That allows stabilization of a vertebral compression
fracture. On the day of her procedure …
When I came in. A lot of pain. It was hard to get around. It was hard to sit in a chair, it was hard
to stand. The only thing I could do to get any relief,
which was very minimal was to lay in bed. But they kept assuring me, “Oh you’re going
to feel so much better. And you’re going to be able to get up and
walk.” And I was sitting there thinking in my mind,
there is no way I’m getting up out of this chair and walking just after they do that. This treatment is usually done between three
days and six weeks after the event that caused the compression fracture. Before that six-week period it’s been shown
to be very, very helpful in getting patients up moving around pain free. In fact, Dr. Gray says 90-percent of those
type of kyphoplasty patients get relief from the procedure. We have patients that come to us on stretchers
that are in such severe pain, that after the procedure they’re able to sit up, stand up
and walk out of the department. When I stood up I was amazed, I didn’t have
the pain. I was just, whoa, this really did work. I was amazed.

A mother’s story of why mental illness ‘should never be a crime’


JUDY WOODRUFF: Mental illness can, of course,
be a very difficult both for patients and their families. In a special episode of Brief But Spectacular,
Jerri Clark, the founder of the group Mothers of the Mentally Ill, tells the story of her
son, who failed to receive adequate support after being diagnosed with bipolar disorder. JERRI CLARK, Founder, Mothers of the Mentally
Ill: My son Calvin is 22. He was very smart from a very young age. In high school, he got hooked into the speech
and debate club, and immediately started winning awards. He was also really athletic. And we were so proud of him. During my son’s freshman year of college,
he was very confused, so we took him home, and he was talking and talking and talking
in circles, when it suddenly occurred to me that this was probably mental illness. He was running around the house, and he became
very concerned that our downstairs bathroom had been possessed. He did some kind of ceremony in there. He closed the door and asked me to never,
ever go in that room again because it wasn’t safe. And that’s when I knew we were in real trouble. My husband got a call that my son had been
found by highway patrol on the side of the highway, and he wasn’t making much sense. My son said he thought the car would run off
of his own energy. Drugs were suspected, so the officer took
my son to a hospital for a drug test. Because he lashed out at the security guards
at the hospital, he was determined to be a danger to others, and so he was detained under
the Involuntary Treatment Act. In the state of Washington — and this is
true in most of the states of the country — an individual in a mental illness crisis
has to meet the criteria of imminent threat. While he was there, the initial hearing for
his DUI charge came up. And so I called the courthouse and said, he
won’t be able to attend that hearing because he’s being detained. The court said that an arraignment for a DUI
charge was non-negotiable and that a bench warrant would automatically be issued for
his arrest. Within a day of leaving that two-week hospitalization,
he was as psychotic and manic as he had been before he went into the hospital. I called the county crisis office, and explained
that I feared for my son’s safety. And I said I can’t call the police because
there’s a bench warrant for his arrest. They said, call the police. Go ahead, and let him get arrested, and then
we will get him some help. They took him to jail and booked him on the
bench warrant. And I immediately started calling to try to
figure out how they were going to now divert him into the hospital, as crisis had explained. There was no legal pathway to do that. I had been misled. The next time I saw my son, he was on a video
monitor from jail. I could tell by his eyes that my son was out
of his mind. He was in a suicide vest, and he had a black
eye and a fat lip. And he was talking in a robotic voice that
sounded almost like a computer. It wasn’t my son. He came out of the system much sicker. Up until that time, we had been terribly afraid
for our son. During that time, we became afraid of our
son. He came and banged on the door. He pushed past me and locked me and my husband
out of our house. I believed that my son had finally met the
threshold for involuntary treatment. So, I called 911, and said we had a medical
emergency. And the police officer who talked to me sneered
at me and said, “Your son will not be taken into care for a nonexistent mental health
condition.” I got a call the next morning from police,
who had found him in the middle of the street wandering in traffic, and he said he was going
to kill himself by lighting himself on fire. He finally met the illusive threshold of the
Involuntary Treatment Act, and he was taken to a hospital. But Washington state didn’t have any beds,
so the ambulance took him across the river into Portland, Oregon. But, after five days, my son no longer met
the threshold of imminent threat. So, they put him in a cab, and dropped him
off at a homeless shelter. My son spent one night in that homeless shelter,
got up the next morning, and jumped off the highway bridge into the Columbia River to
kill himself. My son is a really good swimmer, and he told
me later that, when he hit the water, he realized that it had been a mistake and that he had
other things to do in this life. One week after my son was dumped at a homeless
shelter by a mental hospital, he was arrested. I was deeply afraid for his safety, because
I knew that he would be suicidal. The director of the jail was kind to me and
connected me to the director of psychiatric services. The social worker, who is working through
the public defender’s office, was able to arrange a release plan for my son that includes
housing and wraparound support. They are enthusiastic, encouraging, and amazing
supports to my son. And they assertively help him with putting
his life back together. My son right now is doing amazing, and I’m
so proud of him, because he wants to make his life work and he wants to make his life
meaningful. My name is Jerri Clark, and this is my Brief
But Spectacular take on why mental illness should never be a crime. JUDY WOODRUFF: We are so grateful for your
story, Jerri Clark. Tonight’s Brief But Spectacular was produced
in collaboration with Olympia, Washington-based political reporter Austin Jenkins of the Northwest
News Network. You can find a bonus episode with Jenkins
on our Web site at PBS.org/NewsHour/Brief.

Huge Update On Kairi Sane’s Injury Status After WWE TLC

Huge Update On Kairi Sane’s Injury Status After WWE TLC


Hi Friends welcome to C4E Wrestling News Huge
Update On Kairi Sane’s Injury Status After WWE TLC The main event of WWE TLC 2019 caused
a bit of concern as Kairi Sane reportedly suffered a concussion during the Women’s Tag
Team title match It was clear that Becky Lynch began to call audibles and slow it down once
she realized something had gone wrong During Wrestling Observer Radio Bryan Alvarez spoke
about Kairi Sane’s brutal looking spot that possibly caused an injury He said I thought
that she got hurt when she took the SOS slam into the dasher boards because the mats were
pulled away from the cement and she landed on the cement and not the mat and she totally
fell apart from that point forward He also said I don’t know if it’s a concussion
All I was told was after the show she was in medical I didn’t hear anything after
that Becky did tweet out Kairi Sane you truly are a warrior So I mean there was an injury
we hope that she’s given adequate rest and that it was only a concussion scare and not
an actual concussion Either way WWE will do the right thing and protect her It probably
means that we won’t see her wrestling for the rest of the year but in such cases it’s
the right call to make Friends what are your thought about this Let Us Know in the Comment
Section below and Be Sure to Follow Us on Twitter and Facebook! Also Subscribe to My Channel C 4 E Wrestling
News

Gay Man Confronts Mental Illness, Addiction And His HIV Diagnosis With The Help Of Others.


So my name is Coleman Goode. I’m from Hallettsville, Texas. When I was 25 years old, I checked myself
into a mental hospital because I tried to commit suicide. I, also, at that time had left my boyfriend
who was living with HIV. I was on meth – crystal meth. I’ve been doing that for, on and off for a
couple – 2 years. So my life was on not at its highest point. And I found myself one day in this lime green
two-toned room with a nurse coming into the room and sitting down in front of me. It was March 21, 2005 – 2006 and she told
me that I was HIV positive. I remember staring at her and she – so I think
she was waiting for me to have a reaction but I didn’t. So she responded, “Well, you don’t seem
to be too surprised.” And I’ll never forget this – I said, “Well
if you’ve been doing things I’ve been doing, you wouldn’t be surprised.” I remember leaving the room and I remember
just feeling like the entire world is fell down on me, like what am I gonna do? I’m 25. I’m now HIV+, I’m probably going to die. You know, these are the thoughts that went
through my mind because I didn’t know anyone with HIV, I didn’t know what that looked like. I just didn’t know what my life looked like
after that. So I broke down. I’m in this mental hospital with people I
don’t even know, but they came up to me, they’re hugging me, and they were being supportive
and they didn’t even – like, they didn’t know me. Like, they were some people I just met maybe
the day before, but it was such support that I didn’t understand it or didn’t really expect
it. I felt like the nurses have to be supportive
but these were, like, people – like actual patients. And I jokingly said my time in the hospital
was like “Girl, Interrrupted.” I was like Winona Ryder and we were just these
cast of characters of like, you know, the Island of Misfit Toys. You know, and we were cast away and yet there
was this moment of real connection and it felt very genuine. I mean actually, I decided to call my mom. And so I remember picking up the phone and
calling her and just letting her know where I was, because at that point, my mom and I
weren’t really that close. So I don’t think I had spoken to her in
– probably in months. And so I called her and got her on the phone
and told her that I was HIV+ and that I was, you know, suffering from depression and I
was in a mental hospital because I tried to kill myself. And she was like, “Okay…” She later told me that when she hung up the
phone, she, like, broke down sort of crying. And I knew that was going to hurt her but
it was the first time I was ever actually able to be really honest with her in a very
long time and I think that later played very greatly into our relationship getting a lot
better. You know, later when I was released from the
hospital after being there for three months, getting myself care, you know, finding out
that I was suffering from depression, I had a great therapist that was like this lesbian
and she was telling me about all these great things to do in the community and just kind
of helping me, I guess, feel good about myself, and telling me that there is support for me. The whole experience in the hospital and I
– it sounds really crazy, was so beautiful because I just felt very supported for the
first time and very, very supported by people that didn’t know me and didn’t have – I feel
like they didn’t have – there was nothing they could get out of supporting me and loving
me, but it was very beautiful for me. The hospital set up so I can go to another
– an HIV+ sober house facility. So I got moved there and from there I decided
to go to treatment. I decided that maybe treatment with a better
option for me. And so I got to be in this 90-day program
with people living with HIV, and I got to be newly diagnosed and work through what that
meant and work through what it was – what my life is gonna be like. Through this same program, through this same
agency, I was able to move into another halfway house which is for people living with HIV,
all the way up through a three-quarter home and stayed two years. And another HIV service – agency helped me
get a job. I did job training. And they found me an apartment. You know, I was getting my life together. I was making friends and developing relationships
and finding my first community. I would love to say that I stayed sober for
all the time since then and that things were magically better but it wasn’t, I haven’t
– I’ve struggled with my sobriety. I’ve struggled with my mental illness. Luckily because of the support I have, it
never got to the point where it was in 2005 where I was alone and felt desperate enough
to take my own life. If you had told me in 2005 when I was – I
had been diagnosed at 25 as being HIV+ March 21st, that I would be where I am today…
that I would be an advocate, that I get to go into the community and teach and teach
about advocacy and go to Washington DC and go on the Hill and fight against the Trump
administration, it’s – I would have laughed. I just would have laughed because that’s not
what I thought my life would be. Slowly and surely it’s gotten better. And I’ve developed this really good core of
people around me and I found my place in the gay community. The value of surrounding myself with good
people, positive people is just – I can’t really put a price on it. It’s just really important thing for people
to understand that there is a place for them. They might just have to look for it or make
their own place, but there is a place for people and I think there’s – you don’t have
to be alone if you don’t want to be.

Hiking in Albania with the family – Thru-hike Europe LOG#24


Hi and welcome to this new logbook! We are in Macedonia, we’re about to say goodbye to our last guest, Noé but, let’s rewind, we have plenty to tell you! When Morgane left us next to the Shkoder Lake, we immediately welcomed my family. I mean my brother Noé, whom you have already seen, but also my little sister Lya, my father Lindo and my step-mother Kiwi which have helped us a lot so far and obviously it was super nice to have them with us to share this adventure. This time a logbook a bit special since they will tell you their experience! Nil and Marie welcomed us in a small agrotourism held by a super nice guy named Ahmed, he grows vegetables… Ahmed’s son was super cool, he took us on the first few hundred meters to get started in this epic! The first time we really started climbing was when we left Ahmed’s house. It seemed easy at first, then little by little it started to pull a little in the calves, the shoulders got sore… Branches everywhere, the vegetation taking over the trail, it started to be a little more complicated! After a few hours hiking and the first sensations with the bag on the back, we found an absolutely great spot and we learned how to set up a camp! It was not really obvious, there are lots of little details that we do not think about… The site was just beautiful! We felt free as a bird, far from everything, alone in the world… and together as a family! These phantom villages… covered with vegetation, we bush-wacked with the machete! With the rain, the packs on the back… wild boar trails! Forced to kneel down under the branches… there were really difficult moments. When we came out of the town of Burrel, which is not a very modern city, I would say, we came across many small villages, small houses, quite rustic! People have donkeys, cows, hens… It’s a bit old fashioned we really do not feel like we are on the European continent. While hiking in the countryside, the weather was not very mild, we heard someone behind us, running, calling us. A woman who kindly invited us to follow her to her home. There was her family, her mother-in-law, an absolutely beautiful old woman with an incredible look. We had a fabulous time with them, an incredible meeting and very touching, because those people who seemed to have nothing actually gave us everything in this moment that we shared with them. As you can see today, for those who have already seen me, you know it’s a habit, it’s raining! The “chuva” in Portugal, here we say “shi”, that’s it, it’s “shi-ing”! At the beginning, we thought that as a group of six, it would be complicated to sleep in people’s homes because we take up a lot of space! In Albania, we discovered something that we did not expect: the Albanian hospitality! It’s the coolest people in Europe! We arrived as a family of six, not knowing where to sleep, under the rain, and people open their door to you, invite you to sleep, to eat, to spend some time with them… We met a great family in a small village named Baz. The whole village was basically their house. The Gjinaj family, super super nice! We spent an evening playing chess, dominoes… And shared a great dinner too! A moment we all enjoyed, I think. Hospitality is really important and there is no awkwardness. Actually, it seems natural. As if it was normal, Normal to invite six strangers, foreigners, at home, feed them and give them a roof for the night. We went through an absolutely beautiful countryside, very bucolic, shepherds arrived from nowhere, we knew how to say hello in Albanian, the looks we encountered each time were very kind and full of surprise too. Very nice people, very kind. We headed for a larger village and we arrived on a huge turquoise lake. The setting was just sumptuous! Nil had spotted a peninsula on a lake, a bit inaccessible. We ended up like Robinson Crusoe, We built our camp, for once there was enough wood It was really beautiful! Only very good memories. We were very afraid of coming across vipers, long-nosed vipers, which are actually super dangerous, and in the end we have not seen any, at least I didn’t. But there were a lot of turtles, small tortoises which go pretty fast in fact! And we saw plenty of them. That’s it! Albanians are really charming people. I really took the dimension of Two Steps Towards Others (2PVA), because we are really getting closer to people, Now I even have an Albanian policeman friend! It was steep! At least for us… The packs weighed a bit heavy on the back but we wanted to go forward to see what was up there. We ended up in a setting totally different from what we had seen so far. The view around was just amazing, we took a trail at the edge of the cliff which was impressive. Surprisingly, Albania is not a very developed country there are few roads and nature is pretty much everywhere and it is still quite preserved. Yesterday we hiked in the forest and when we arrived at the top, we found a great spot! Some pebbles and a red soil. Kind of an Arizona atmosphere, mountains on both sides. A kind of scrub full of plants, a pretty arid landscape! We could settle there and make a small fire, it was really nice. There was a beautiful landscape and we enjoyed it a lot. After a good climb with the family, where we saw our dad struggled a bit in the climbs, we reached the sea, in Lezhe. For the last night with the family, we booked a nice room by the sea, super nice, nibble a little fish… We made the reservation on a well known website It was a bit more rock’n’roll than expected but still a nice evening. These few days spent in nature, brought me back to my childhood and filled me with a lot of energy because we were in family. Of course with the characters of each but I think it’s something that connects us and it made me happy to see that all of us was willing to get there in his own way and here we are! LYA, YOUR FIRST NIGHTS CAMPING? The nights under the tent, it really depended on the weather. The sleeping-bag is too hot so you have to undress, to open it, it’s not very handy. In addition, I have a dad who snores… But honestly, I was expecting worse. I had never camped before and I had good nights, and I can get up at 8:00 AM without much difficulty! SOME FEARS BEFORE COMING? Oh, I was full of apprehensions! I had never camped. so with back pain, I thought it was going to be really hard. Hiking is not really my thing. I must confess that in Paris, when I walk one kilometer a day, it’s huge already. So, hiking twenty kilometers! Really a HUGE apprehension, yes. MOMENTS THAT WILL STAY IN YOUR HEART? My favorite moments were camping moments where we were all around the fire to eat freeze-dried food, talking about everything and anything, making the assessment of the day, complaining about the scratches and wounds of each of us… I think it was really the funniest moments. AT THE END, A WALK IN THE PARK? It was very very very difficult. For me for Kiwi too and for Lya who grumbled a lot but we made it! We made it! and I think that the pleasure was more important and it was really beautiful. WHAT MEANS 2PVA TO YOU? It’s an experience that allows you to
to meet simple people, but people who bring us a lot in terms of open-mindedness and who give us a real lesson, each in his own way. WHAT WAS YOUR MAIN MOTIVATION? It was very important for me to share this challenge, and to accompany them in their history, somewhow to be a part of it. To share a moment together, to accompany them. AT THE END, NOT DISAPPOINTED BY ALBANIA? Without question, I made a good choice to come to Albania. I really wanted to discover this country because very apart in a way and so close to us yet. After years of communism and a back-and-forth in the modern European world, it’s really surprising as a country. What I can tell you it’s to come and discover Albania because it’s a great place! LINDO, WHAT WILL YOU REMEMBER FROM THIS TRIP? The landscape, the Albanians, those evenings around the fire without cell phone saying simple things, talking about our big calves and our insect bites… I remember this trip as an important moment, very important. YOUR WORST MEMORY? My worst memory… it’s the end!

Bud’s Story: Overcoming A Broken Neck and Fractured Skull


June 5th of 2015… I went up on a ladder. I was going to
paint the trim in our house. It shifted a little bit and I fell off the ladder, and
I hit my head on the way down on a beam and I knocked myself out and I face-planted
in the driveway. I got hurt really bad. I broke my neck, I fractured my skull, I broke in a couple
places and I broke every bone in my face. I
fractured my hip and I had a big gash over my left eye. When we arrived at Kindred, Bud was
still pretty well out of it. I cannot believe that it’s been 8 months and
I’ve made this much progress. Bob was the man. He took such good care of me. Bob not only was the respiratory guy, but
he was like he was my mentor. He had a great family, a wonderful family,
so that the support was there. He just had to be encouraged. He’s like you gotta fight through this,
you gotta put everything you got into this, you gotta push yourself. We have no magic pills here and no
magic wands, I said, but what we do have is a good
support structure to support your body’s gains. And your body will tell me how
quickly it’s ready to advance and make it through this. When I first came here they thought that
I was going to be here for 6 or 8 months, and I ended up going home just a little short of a month. It was
amazing the progress that he made. He just every day was coming along and
coming along, and I mean with the injuries that he had, the doctor that
took care of him here, Dr. Miranga, said that on paper it doesn’t look like this
should be possible. He’s a miracle and you guys had a hand
in that miracle at Kindred. We really can’t thank you enough.