TROPA GURIPA 4×13 ABRIENDO UN FIRST AID KIT AMERICANO (CARLISLE MODEL)

TROPA GURIPA 4×13 ABRIENDO UN FIRST AID KIT AMERICANO (CARLISLE MODEL)


Hi “guripas”! I’m about to open this time capsule. If you don’t know, it’s a very important item
of the American equipment in the WW2. Inside, soldiers
carried a first aid kit. Although the pouch is a reproduction inside I have an original kit. The Carlisle model. It took its name from
a military headquarters in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. There, a Medical Department Laboratory
was established by the army in the 20’s. What is inside? A bandage, compressed. It comes in a metal container and even it came
to be made of plastic. The objective was to protect
the bandage against chemicals and to ensure
that it remained sterile. Although it already
existed during the First World War, this container
was developed in 1940, WW2. More specifically this model
was manufactured between 1941 and 1943. We know this
because on the reverse it says that it contains
also an envelope of sulfanilamide. In fact, if you shake it
you’ll hear a noise like sugar. Well, the 1940 model
didn’t contain sulfanilamide. The later ones did. Another way to indicate it,
in addition to the text, was painting
the container in red-orange. As you see this item
after years in reenactment has chipped paint on the edges. Following introductions, let’s go! Let’s open it. I’m a little bit nervous. This is like opening a can. But a 75 years old can. There it goes. Here we go. That’s it! As I told you there is a bandage. As you can see I put on gloves
because it could happen that the sulfa envelope was damaged. Sulfonamides are a chemical
that kills bacteria. It’s not recommended to touch it
and much less to inhale it. So we encourage you
to do this with gloves. I’m also going to take this
to a recycling center in a pharmacy. Let’s continue. The envelope says
that it contains 5 gr of sulfa. It opens here. Let’s go with the bandage. Perfect. Here it is. It has instructions. In red letters. So, in case of an injury myself, or a partner will sprinkle
first the sulfa over wound. Then it’s time to apply the bandage. Remember that the red text
doesn’t go next to the wound. So let’s imagine that
my arm has a wound. We sprinkle the envelope
and then we apply the dressing. There are straps. Now you see them. So you can wrap the chest, head
or neck and tie the ends together. There were larger bandages but they didn’t fit in the container. It was something for medics. Towards the end of the war
a new bandage was created to camouflage
the white color so visible. Now it was darker. The container also changed. Instead of metal
the bandage came in a cardboard box in a plastic wrap that also
ensure that it remained sterile. That’s all. As I told you I will take this
to a recycling center in a pharmacy. I will close the container. To keep carrying it in reenactment. I keep the bandage out. It may be useful for a photoshoot
or to show what’s inside. The same with the envelope. And if you think I did wrong
because I damaged an original item you should know that
hundreds of thousands were produced. Nowadays there are still stocks. I have another one. They cost around 10 €
in any military collection shop. That’s all for today. I hope you liked
our first “unboxing”. If so, like and share. See you on next video. Dismissed!

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